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Author Topic: NEW RESTORATION WEBSITE  (Read 12056 times)
W4OP
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« on: November 27, 2011, 12:55:07 PM »

I have made a small dent in getting some of my restoration photos on my site. I hope thse will perhaps be a help to others looking for details of some of the older rigs as they do their own restoration. About 40 more rigs to go- but it's a start.
Text for each rig to follow, then I'll continue adding more rigs:

http://www.parelectronics.com/vintage-radio-restoration.php


73,

Dale W4OP
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K5WLR
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« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2011, 12:59:11 PM »

Nice photos, Dale. i especially liked the RME 4350. Used to have one of those when I was in FL. Mine was very rough, yours looks brand new!

 Grin

73!

Will Rogers
K5WLR (ex W4WLR)

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W4OP
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« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2011, 12:31:30 PM »

Hi Will,
So nice to hear from you.
The 4350 was a bit of  a basket case when I got it. A friend, W0TDH came back from the Shelby 'fest with a 4300. I repaired the 75:1 drive for him and was very impressed with the RX sound and VFO stability.
So I bought a 4350 and added the xtal cal. Mine also needed the 75:1 drive to be repaired but is now silky smooth. The neat thing (that I am sure you recall) is that  by grabbing the inner knob you can QSY the band instantaneously. Audio is absolutely fabulous. The  current project is to add  a product detector with AGC as the stock CW/SSB is the typical BFO and no AGC. Along with the product detector I am adding a Murata filter to help with SSB/CW selectivity. The mod is a snap as RME already provided IF OUT/ AUDIO IN RCA jacks to  the rear panel.

I would take the 4350 over any of  the Hammarlunds, Hally's or Nationals I have owned.

73,

Dale W4OP
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KB4QAA
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« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2011, 05:49:09 PM »

Great photos Dale.  So warm and clear.   Looks like you are the 'glamour radio' photographer!

Cheers, Bill
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W4OP
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« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2011, 11:14:57 AM »

Thanks Bill,
I just posted my 75S-3B, Hallicrafters SX-88 (only one pix, looking for the rest) and the very rare Sideband Engineers (SBE) SB-35 to the site:
http://www.parelectronics.com/vintage-radio-restoration.php

The SX-88 was a true basket case- the front panel had to  have a new silk screen, both dial glasses were broken (and of course, they had graphics on them) and the case was a wreck. I spent  almost a full day just on the knobs.

The Collins RX was filthy but restorable with original finishes. Two tubes had been swapped out at some point, making audio low and no product detector. One wonders how these things happen- and even more intriguing, how the swap is not corrected.

Next to go up is the Hally SR-400/HA-20, the Kenwood Twins and  then the Morrow Twins.

73,
Dale W4OP
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W7VO
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« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2011, 04:30:10 PM »

Interesting to see a SB-35! I worked in the repair department for SBE in Watsonville, CA from 1975 to 1979 repairing customer returned CBs, VHF marine radios, scanners, and the ham gear; SB-33s, SB-34s (LOTs of those), and the dreaded SB-36, but I NEVER saw a SB-35 the whole time I was there. That HAS to be a rare beast!

BTW, back in those days NOTHING ever came into repair from a ham that had not already had at least a couple of hands into it already!  Shocked

73;
Mike, W7VO
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K0OD
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« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2011, 10:56:00 PM »

Quote
The SX-88 was a true basket case- the front panel had to  have a new silk screen, both dial glasses were broken (and of course, they had graphics on them) and the case was a wreck. I spent  almost a full day just on the knobs

How does an ultra rare SX-88 become a basket case? According to this article they cost $595 in 1954/1955 and fewer than 100 are believed to survive.  http://antiqueradio.org/halli09.htm
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W4OP
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« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2011, 06:48:19 AM »

I really can't answer "how" it became a basket  case, but it was on the ground underneath a table at Dayton- looking very sad.  It was purchased  for the asking price of $50 in 2000.

Dale W4OP
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K0OD
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« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2011, 08:20:37 AM »

I've never even seen an SX-88 and I've been a ham since 1957. Perhaps some went to the military which might explain the one you picked up.

Dale, must say I'm very impressed by your skills.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2011, 12:56:47 PM by K0OD » Logged
W4OP
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« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2011, 09:08:52 AM »

"Interesting to see a SB-35! I worked in the repair department for SBE in Watsonville, CA from 1975 to 1979 repairing customer returned CBs, VHF marine radios, scanners, and the ham gear; SB-33s, SB-34s (LOTs of those), and the dreaded SB-36, but I NEVER saw a SB-35 the whole time I was there. That HAS to be a rare beast"

You're right Mike. I only know of one other SB-35 in existance- a W9 has it.
Speculation  has it that the 35, like the 36 was a Japanese product- but I see no signs of this. All American components and  the layout and design is  classic American.

I wonder if you knew Dave Bradley (W6CUB SK). Dave was a VP at SBE. When I  found the SB-35, it came with several  sales brochures- one had some pencil circuitry drawings on the back and Dave's name and call- obviously written down for the ham who was at a trade show looking at the SB-35. Dave was  a VP at an antenna firm I worked at for many years and a good friend.

Dale W4OP
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W7VO
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« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2011, 01:54:37 PM »

Dale;

W6CUB certainly sounds familiar, and as I recall the President of SBE when I worked there named Dave. Same guy? (I was a young whipper-snapper back then, and there has been a lot water under the bridge since!). As as side note; SBE went under 1978 when the FCC added new channels to the CB band and type acceptance for the new 40 channel radios, and SBE got stuck with returned dealer inventories of 23 channel radios that could not be legally sold anymore. Federal intervention did it again....

When I was there Gordon West, WB6NOA was marketing the SBE products. He was young back then too!

Another side note; The SB-36 (actually sourced from Robyn in JA) IMHO was one of the worse ham rigs ever devised, (save for the neat nixie tube display). Few were made, and no two were built exactly the same because of stability problems. I rued the day that one of those came in for repair. The old SB-33 was the best of the bunch (although I know nothing about the SB-35!)

There was a matching amp to the SB-36 (SB3-LA) that was a clone of a Heath SB-220. I know of at least one of those still around and belongs to a ham in Santa Cruz. I wonder if there was a matching amp to the SB-35?

Ah, the memories! Cheesy

73;

Mike,W7VO
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W4OP
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« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2012, 06:41:21 PM »

Hi Mike,
I had the schematic of the amp that went with the SB-35, and it also may have been the SB-3LA. I just don't recall.

I just added the Hallicrafters FPM-300 Mk II and, although not a boatanchor, it is just too pretty not to be included- the Yaesu white face FT-107M and VFO. The trim on the 107M had a number of chips in it- very common. They are now restored and gone.
My Morrow Twins may be the next rigs to go up.

73,
Dale W4OP
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WB4SNU
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« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2012, 08:19:41 AM »

Boy does this bring back memories. The multi Elmac was my first transmitter. You sure do a fantastic job of restoring. Mine was pretty rough but it worked ok.
I vision myself as a boat anchor restorer wannabe. One of these days if age doesn't get me, I am going to start restoring some old equipment. I don't think I'll ever be as good as you are though.
Keep up the excellent work. It is well worth it from my viewpoint.

Richard  WB4SNU
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Digital and CW spoken here.
W0FM
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« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2012, 11:37:09 AM »

VERY impressive collection, Dale.  Your dial and meter faces are extremely sharp and clean.  Do you make new ones for yourself or have you found a vendor who does such a nice job?  I found a local who made a few dial faces and he made one for my Philco cathederal restoration.  That was years ago and I know the technology to replace meter and dial faces must have changed dramatically.

Great work my friend.  I am envious to say the least.

73 de Terry, WØFM
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W4OP
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« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2012, 04:45:04 PM »

I have just posted the restoration of  my Morrow mobile Twins- MB-6 / MB-565 on my restoration site at:

http://www.parelectronics.com/vintage-radio-restoration.php
last thumnail- lower right.

As can be seen in one of the photos- these were in very tough shape mechanically and had a number of intriguing electrical issues to be solved. I believe these to be the Cadillac of the  mobile Twins both from a design and feature standpoint.
Enjoy,

Dale W4OP
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