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Author Topic: Fuses  (Read 1711 times)
KJ4OBR
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Posts: 104




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« on: December 04, 2011, 05:36:08 PM »

Any thoughts about replacing the stock 15 amp glass fuses (at the battery end + &-) on a Yaesu ft-8900 with 15 amp blade fuses and holders? My Audi was totaled recently when a guy pulled out in front of me so I'm needing to replace that wiring when I move the radio to the other car.

Thanks!

73
Dave
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2011, 06:23:21 PM »

The fuse holders are readily available at most auto parts stores along with the fuses.  All of my DC operated radios now have the automotive style fuses.
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1079




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« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2011, 09:31:59 PM »

Most newer cars have an axillary fuse socket available on the fuse block. I find it easy to use this in lieu of a separate fuse holder. Make sure that the current available is high enough to operate your transceiver. A proper fuse is a proper fuse no mater what the shape size or holder.

73s

K2OWK
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KJ4OBR
Member

Posts: 104




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« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2011, 04:52:03 AM »

I always run directly to the battery and have a couple of fuses there. I trust 10g wire a lot more than 14-16g the auto manufacturer uses to carry the amps. It may be easy to tap into the auto wiring, but I don't think it's the best way to do it.

73
Dave


Most newer cars have an axillary fuse socket available on the fuse block. I find it easy to use this in lieu of a separate fuse holder. Make sure that the current available is high enough to operate your transceiver. A proper fuse is a proper fuse no mater what the shape size or holder.

73s

K2OWK

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K0BG
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« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2011, 05:34:36 AM »

You don't want to ever use existing vehicle wiring to power any radio gear, even a handheld. Besides being dangerous, doing so shows a lack of patience.
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K7RBW
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Posts: 402




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« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2011, 06:48:47 AM »

It's amazing how small the wire is in a new car compared to the fuse they have protecting the circuit. I'm sure they have it engineered down to the sub-millimeter, but I wouldn't want to connect anything that used more than about 5 amps to the accessory wiring I've seen in my last two cars. They say the circuits are rated for 10 amps (120w), but when you look behind the panel, you see what looks like 18-22 ga wire connected to it. On top of that, there's the connector resistance and corresponding heat build up that you get in the lighter plug/socket connection with higher current draws. Lighter plugs are really BAD connectors, IMO.

In my car, I ran 10-ga wire from the battery to power-pole connectors (see the thread I posted a while back). The wires and the connectors should be able to handle 30 amps without any problem. Even if neither of my car's is an Audi, I'd still feel really bad if I melted the accessory connector (or worse).
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