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Author Topic: monitor...LCD vs LED  (Read 8203 times)
KM3K
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« on: November 25, 2011, 06:58:58 PM »

I've just ordered a new HP tower (nothing fancy; dual-core @2.7 GHz; 6 GB RAM; Win7; wireless).
I want to buy a new monitor for it and so have to choose between LCD or LED monitor.
In the store, display-wise they all look the same to me as I see no difference between the two regardless of manufacturer;
The monitor's primary use would be for ham-radio; when the dust settles, I expect to run Fldigi, MMTTY and N1MM with some casual contesting too.
I'd appreciate reading any comments, ideas or recommendations on LCD vs LED monitors as applies to ham-radio usage.
73 Jerry km3k
PS. I've given up on trying to use my Dell laptop; grandchildren have taken it over to do homework assignments.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2011, 07:21:48 PM »

My eyes cannot discern the difference. Get the cheaper one. You are not talking home theater here.
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W8JX
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« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2011, 09:32:54 PM »

All monitors are LCD. The "difference" is that some are florescent back-lit and better ones are LED back-lit. (where they get LED in name from)  LED is more energy efficient but cost more to manufacture. Focus more on size and how crisp picture is and contrast ratio here more than back light type.  Biggest advantage LED back lit has over other is it is more "green" and less RFI :potential".   
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All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
KM3K
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« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2011, 06:44:49 AM »

All monitors are LCD.
The "difference" is that some are florescent back-lit and better ones are LED back-lit. (where they get LED in name from) 
LED is more energy efficient but cost more to manufacture.
Focus more on size and how crisp picture is and contrast ratio here more than back light type. 
Biggest advantage LED back lit has over other is it is more "green" and less RFI :potential".   
All the above is good to know.
I suppose size is an individual choice; I was going for the 20" based on what I could afford.
Contrast-ratio?? no clue what that means.
In fact, I have no idea what the buttons on a monitor do; I've never gotten a manual with a monitor and the one time I tried messing with the four buttons, I messed things up so badly, I've never tried it again.
73 Jerry km3k
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W8JX
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2011, 08:07:09 AM »


Contrast-ratio?? no clue what that means.


It is the difference in brightness between black and white (from brightest white  to darkest black) The higher the number the better. 1000 to 1 is poor by today's standards so shoot for 5000 to 1 or better. (CRT's beat LCD's for a lot of years until recently in this area and I still use a  big Trinitron CRT here on one computer because of picture quality ) Many do not realize the light behind LCD display is constantly on and a fixed brightness level.  Black is when LCD crystals are aligned as such to stop all light passing through them. Better quality LCD display are "tighter" in alignment and can block light better and give a higher contrast ratio. With a high contrast display pictures look snappier/sharper and black letters are on a white background are sharper too.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 09:39:37 AM by W8JX » Logged

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G4AON
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« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2011, 08:53:47 AM »

Assuming there isn't a huge cost difference, the power consumption of an LED monitor should be much less than a similar size LCD so might be worth considering on that basis.

I use two 17 inch monitors, it's handy to have logging on one and Skimmer/Cluster on the other. Saves having too much clutter on one monitor. Most of the older graphic cards had 1 x digital and 1 x analogue output, unfortunately the result isn't usually matched in screen display size/format. I use a dual digital card which gives a perfect match on both screens.

73 Dave
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W8JX
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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2011, 02:27:46 PM »

I would just rather have one BIG screen (22 or bigger) and run everything on it. When i use more than one screen I use more than one computer. I just use two wireless mouses and keyboards.
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KM3K
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« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2011, 08:12:06 PM »

I would just rather have one BIG screen (22 or bigger) and run everything on it.

I'm curious to ask "What is everything?"

I ended up buying a 20" HP model 2021x on sale at OfficeMax but, although the on-line manual for it had no specs on contrast-ratio, it does have this statement that it has "Dynamic Contrast Ratio to provide deeper blacks and brighter whites for brilliant shading effects while gaming or watching movies."
I'll see how well that works out when I pick-up the new HP tower and monitor Wednesday 11/30.

I wonder how crowded the 20" screen will get while running during "casual contesting":
1. logging software by N1MM (suggested to me as the best software for contesting),
2. CAT program by Logger32 (this works well on my FT-950),
3. Goggle Chrome for QRZ.

73 Jerry km3k
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K2CMH
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Posts: 278




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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2011, 12:22:24 PM »

I would buy the LED backlit monitor because I have experienced many LCD monitor failures that were backlit with flourescent due to the flourescent backlighting failing...either the light strips themselves or the ballast.  You are much less likely to have that happen with an LED based backlight.
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N0NB
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« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2011, 06:09:42 AM »

With Linux, XFCE, and a Radeon dual port video card I am able to run two separate desktops so I keep my logging program running on the monitor above the radio and my main desktop on the monitor on the desk off to the side.  Both are 17" 1280x1024 Samsung monitors.  So far I've no need for a wide screen although if one should fail, it will likely be replaced with a wide screen.  That said I have a couple of used 17" spares in the spare bedroom so I'm probably good to go for some time.

I'll be putting in an LED backlit TV at work next week.  I'll have to see if the picture is that much better to my aging eyes.
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73, de Nate
Bremen, KS

SKCC 6225
N5SWE
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« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2011, 04:42:09 PM »

My choice is LED. LED expected life is over 20 years. LCD will begin to dim and after 3 years may need replacement. LED uses less juice and runs slightly cooler.
73
Roy
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K0JEG
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« Reply #11 on: December 26, 2011, 07:47:43 AM »

One other thing to consider is how easy it is to calibrate. You mentioned you don't know "anything about the buttons" but if you start to do anything with digital pictures and photography you'll want to make sure you are really seeing what the image looks like,especially if you make prints. A few dollars now will save a lot of frustration down the road.

And besides, you're going to be staring at the monitor for long periods of time. Your eyes will thank you if everything is set up correctly
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W8JX
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« Reply #12 on: December 26, 2011, 09:08:30 AM »

Any decent video card will let you tweak it in software.
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KD8RFT
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« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2011, 03:58:17 PM »

one of my jobs at work its to help pick out monitors and other computer hardware for hundreds of engineers. get the biggest monitor you can afford. you should be able to get a decent 24" lcd 1920x1080 (1080p) monitor for less than $150 on sites like newegg, tiger direct or amazon.  it its not too big.  the more screen space you have the more productive you will be.

dual or triple monitors are another great way to increase screen real estate. I run duals at work, wish I had three.
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