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Author Topic: When to send AR  (Read 434 times)
N2NCS
Member

Posts: 21




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« on: February 09, 2005, 11:10:07 PM »

When should you send AR (end of transmission) before your callsign or after.  I hear a lot of both ways. The way I do it is after I end with hw cpy? I send AR then the other callsign then mine and then KN.  I hear some people sending that way others send AR after callsigns and before KN.  If you get the way Im drifting.
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W5ESE
Member

Posts: 550


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2005, 06:59:37 AM »

Officially, AR is supposed to be used when you first
attempt to establish contact with a station. After
two-way contact is established, you then use 'K'
or 'KN' in subsequent exchanges.

So you might reply to my CQ:

W5ESE DE N2NCS AR

at the end of my reply back to you (giving you my
name, QTH, etc), I would send

N2NCS DE W5ESE K

You might want to print out these operating aids
from the ARRL Field Services Department:

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/forms/fsd220.pdf

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/forms/fsd218.pdf

and you might find this article helpful:

http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2002/03/17/1/

In practice, though, no one is gonna bite your
head off if you use 'AR' in lieu of 'K'. It's
widely done.

There are alot of informal abbreviations also,
like 'BCNU' for 'I'll be seeing you', 'ES' for
'and', and 'I I' for indicating a sending
mistake.

HVE FUN ES 73
Scott W5ESE
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20595




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« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2005, 10:51:20 AM »

I think KN is a waste of time unless you really, really want to make sure nobody breaks into your QSO.

So is "hw cpy?" when a simple "hw?" says the same thing and takes less time.

So is sending anything other than BK at the end of transmissions, unless ten minutes has passed and it's time to identify again!

But it's true, no CW op should bite your head off, no matter what you do.  No one process is 100% correct.

Have fun with it.  But I'd cut back on the "hw cpy?" stuff, as the "cpy" part really does waste time...

73 es CU in the pileups

WB2WIK/6
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RobertHarrisExAA6RH
Member

Posts: 6




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« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2005, 09:00:16 PM »

To quote the 1972 edition of the ARRL Radio Amateur's Operating Manual:

"AR means "end of transmission." It is not necessarily an invitation to transmit. It simply signifies that the transmission is at an end. In message handling proceedure it has the special meaning: "end of message" and is used after the signature. AR is used after calling a station with which contact has not already been established. Thus if X6XXX has just finished a QSO, the calling proceedure would be: X6XXX DE YY7YYY AR. When X6XXX answers the new call he uses "K". YY7YYY DE X6XXX K."

For WIK..........

Why bother with BK which is over used and abused when K means "over". Moreover even K is not needed if for instance someone asks a question such as WB6WIK/6 DE AA6RH QTH IMI, The meaning is clear without a prosign at all.

Cheers everyone..........

Rob
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WA4MJF
Member

Posts: 1003




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« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2005, 07:58:11 AM »

AR is the voice out.  

K (KN) is voice over.

I hope that helps.

73 de Ronnie
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N2NCS
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2005, 06:54:26 PM »

Thanks all and I agree that there is no 100% sure way, but if people get picky between 73 and 73s (and I know the difference) or swr and swr's (which I don't understand). Swr's is plural for swr. There can be one swr per frequency or many swr's per band. But none the less I agree with you. I just listened to a tape (supposed test) that finished with callsign de callsign .-.-. -.--. AR KN. I suppose that is the correct way but I see that it is a waste to use it.

Also I should clarify if I must,  if we were to work, the first go round I send hw cpy? I work a lot in the novice section on 40 and so I have made a few first qso contacts and so to spell it out more than just hw? is probably the thing to do. The second go round or more I start abbrieviating everything as much as possible. But not to much on the first. I do keep it short with rst,qth,name however. I am not racing anyone I would rather chew the rag than work somebody contest style anytime. Though working contests have recently caught my ear.



 
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2802




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« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2005, 02:58:37 PM »

Reminds me of my early days in Navy Radioman school in 1963.  I'd been a ham for about 4 years, so code was the least of my problems.  However, the Navy (and I believe ALL of the military branches) took a dim view of using AR to mean anything but END OF WORK.

BT was "End of message", with more traffic to follow.
AR was "End of work", no more traffic.
K  was "Over".

Of course, the Navy didn't recognize the question mark in Morse code, either.  If you wanted to know how strong your signal was at the "other" end, you wouldn't say "QSA? K" -- you'd say "INT QSA K".  After I got off Active Duty in 1966, I imagine some of my first QSOs were strange sounding!
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
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