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Author Topic: Alinco DX-70  (Read 2994 times)
N4ECM
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« on: December 27, 2011, 07:27:23 PM »

How can you tell the difference between an Alinco DX-70T and a DX-70TH.  I know the TH is 100 watts on 6m and the T is 10w.  I think I have a T, but am not totally sure. How can you tell besides hooking up a watt meter?  I bought this rig used and it is like new!  (I don't have a 6m antenna up yet.)  Thanks, Don
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K6LCS
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« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2011, 09:37:55 PM »

Hmmm ... the real difference is on the 6M band - 40W versus 4W. I thought that the high power ones were labeled on the tag, DX-70T(H) - but an owner will let us know if that's right.

DX-70TH (SSB, CW, FM) 1.8MHz-30MHz and 5OMHz-54MHz: 100 Watts
DX-70TH (AM) 1.8 MHz - 30 MHz and 50 MHz - 54 MHz: 40 Watts

DX-70T (SSB, CW, FM) 1.8MHz-30MHz 100 Watts; 50MHz-54MHz: 10 Watts
DX-70T (AM) 1.8 MHz - 30 MHz 40 Watts; 5OMHz - 54 MHz: 4 Watts

Clint K6LCS
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Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com
KE3WD
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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2011, 09:37:04 AM »

How can you tell the difference between an Alinco DX-70T and a DX-70TH.  I know the TH is 100 watts on 6m and the T is 10w.  I think I have a T, but am not totally sure. How can you tell besides hooking up a watt meter?  I bought this rig used and it is like new!  (I don't have a 6m antenna up yet.)  Thanks, Don

Well, the REAL difference is that the TH models use an entirely different Power Amp which features FET transistors for outputs, while the straight T model uses bipolar output transistors. 

The TH thus touts better specs in just about every category worthy of mention.  The TH makes for a better  amplifier driver, as well, when compared with the bipolar, as far as specs are concerned. 

The use of the FETS, which have a higher frequency cutoff than the bipolars, is the reason for the increased power available on the 6 meter band.  That said, the "magic band" can be just as much fun with 5W as it can with 100W, give or take, due to the nature of propagation on 6 meters.  When its open, it doesn't take much power, and when it isn't open, that power difference likely won't be a situation solver in the vast majority of cases.  Of course, if you are into line-of-sight paths, it may, if you've got the antenna installation for the job. 

Identifying which one you've got is as easy as turning the radio around and inspecting the back panel ID plate. 

The TH will be there on the ID tag if you have one.


73
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N4ECM
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« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2011, 11:09:24 PM »

Thanks.  I looked at the tag previously thinking something would be there, but it wasn't.  Thanks to your post I now know it is not an "H" model like I suspected and was told.
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TANAKASAN
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« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2011, 06:45:04 AM »

Wouldn't the 100W model be heavier?

Tanakasan
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KE3WD
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« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2011, 01:53:36 PM »

Wouldn't the 100W model be heavier?

Tanakasan

Both are 100W on the HF bands.  Only difference is that the T is down in output on the 6M band due to the use of the bipolar transistor PA. 

Weightwise, there may be a difference, but it would be slight indeed. 


73
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