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Author Topic: FT-60 question  (Read 28913 times)
N4NYY
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Posts: 4818




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« on: August 05, 2012, 08:14:55 AM »

My club is holding their first hunt, and I am the driver of a group and using my HT (Ft-60). I rarely change the settings son the HT from from memories, but put it in VFO mode and removed all the squelches and tones. So now, I have clear display, with the exception of the repeater shift showing minus. Does this shift have to be turned off, even though it is in VFO mode and simplex?

We are really taking a stab at this, as none of us have ever done it. We have about 3 or 4 people in the car, and got the maps and compasses out. It really sounds like a fun thing to do.

Oh, BTW. I had no idea this HT had an S meter. But that should help.
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N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4818




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« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2012, 05:41:45 PM »

I figured it out. And that first fox hunt was a hell of an experience.
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13486




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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2012, 05:59:02 PM »

Quote from: N4NYY

We are really taking a stab at this, as none of us have ever done it. We have about 3 or 4 people in the car, and got the maps and compasses out. It really sounds like a fun thing to do.



The more, the merrier, especially of none of them know what they are doing.

I find it much easier to read the meter on a mobile FM rig, but an HT can be used if that
is all you have.  I put a coax switch between the front seats to make it easier to attach
the DF antenna while still having the regular antenna available (but take it off if it is too
close to your beam, as it will affect the pattern.)

As you well may have discovered, the two most challenging aspects of transmitter hunting
on VHF are the need for a good attenuator when you get close, and learning how to deal
with reflections.  The "offset" or "active" type is preferred, which requires switching between
two frequencies.  I typically put one in memory and one in the VFO to make it easy to
switch between them, though adjacent memory channels also works.
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N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4818




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« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2012, 11:22:52 AM »

Quote from: N4NYY

We are really taking a stab at this, as none of us have ever done it. We have about 3 or 4 people in the car, and got the maps and compasses out. It really sounds like a fun thing to do.



The more, the merrier, especially of none of them know what they are doing.

I find it much easier to read the meter on a mobile FM rig, but an HT can be used if that
is all you have.  I put a coax switch between the front seats to make it easier to attach
the DF antenna while still having the regular antenna available (but take it off if it is too
close to your beam, as it will affect the pattern.)

As you well may have discovered, the two most challenging aspects of transmitter hunting
on VHF are the need for a good attenuator when you get close, and learning how to deal
with reflections.  The "offset" or "active" type is preferred, which requires switching between
two frequencies.  I typically put one in memory and one in the VFO to make it easy to
switch between them, though adjacent memory channels also works.

We had fun. My team got within 1 mile of the Fox, when we started to get overloaded signals. That is where you need an attenuator.  I heard people tell me when you are close, to remove the coax or use a paper clip for an antenna.

A quick Google showed an attenuator for $39 and a Yagi for under $50. You can literally get started for under $100. Way more fun than I ever thought it would be.
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13486




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« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2012, 01:40:45 PM »

And if you build them yourself, they are even cheaper.  None of them are difficult.
I prefer a quad for mobile hunting, as it doesn't stick up as high above the roof
for vertical polarization.  I use #12 solid copper wire and bend it back into shape
when it encounters a tree branch.

Yagis are good for getting out on foot, either using tape measure elements (which
can be used with any yagi design) or some #14 wire stuck through a board.

The "offset" attenuator is just a crystal oscillator feeding a mixer through a pot,
with a couple connectors.  Add a switch if you want to get fancy.  For those
who prefer Glo-FETs you could use a 12AD4 or 955 Acorn tube in the oscillator
and run it off +12V.  We used to make kits for the locals and the total parts
count was less than 20, including the connectors and switch.

Here is one version of many, though I'd separate the DC and RF on the mixer to
prevent spurious responses, and probably use a balanced mixer:

http://www.homingin.com/joek0ov/offatten.html
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4818




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« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2012, 07:12:08 PM »

I think the $39 for the attenuator was a kit that you have to build. I think it was $59 fully assembled.
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VU2NAN
Member

Posts: 253




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« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2013, 11:16:16 PM »

Hi OM Vinnie,

Why not build this?

http://nandustips.blogspot.in/2011/02/fox-hunt-attenuator.html

It's fun!

73,

Nandu.
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