Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 40 meter SW intereference  (Read 792 times)
KB8NMZ
Member

Posts: 8




Ignore
« on: March 04, 2005, 01:58:50 PM »

Hi folks-

I got my novice in '92 and an HW-8 with which I made a few dozen contacts (all on 40 meters at night, mostly regional to Michigan) and had fun. Then several moves occurred, the HW went into a box, etc etc.

But now I'm settled in a nice home with a back yard so I threw up a long wire and hooked everything up. Went to 40 meters and was hit by amazing huge amounts of SW broadcasts all over the novice segment of 40.

I retreated to 20 meters and have made one contact so far (my CW is horribly rusty, but that's another story).

But the question is, is 40 meters dead to novices now due to these SW stations? Is there any hope? I have ordered a K2 kit...maybe it will be able to deal with the problem better?

I think I'll have my General in a month or two, so I could then try other areas of 40 meters, but my code is so slow that I would feel stupid calling CQ at 6 wpm outside of the novice bands.

I'll happily take any opinions, thanks!
Logged
N2NCS
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2005, 03:55:47 PM »

The 40m segment has always been full of forign broadcasters at least as long as I remember. Nothing new here.  I suspect your wire antenna or something is doing alot better at this qth and you are hearing them now. Nightime on 40m is propagation time for them to roll in strong. Daytime 40 is much quieter with strong stateside contacts.

20m is a tough band to work 6wpm on. Dx stations don't seem to understand "qrs pls". BTW what were you doing on 20m with a novice license?

40m novice is good but you will have to work in between broadcasters.
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20636




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2005, 04:01:42 PM »

Stay off 20m until you have your General!

But the K2 will certainly "deal with" the broadcast signals much, much better.  Even at night when the BC stations are very strong, I have no problems at all if I want to work the 40m Novice subband -- the BC stations stay on channels usually 5 kHz or 10 kHz apart, and using CW, it's very easy to have QSOs in between them.

Also, since it sounds like you have the space available, try 80m.  At night, the band's in great shape and there aren't any broadcasters.

WB2WIK/6
Logged
KB8NMZ
Member

Posts: 8




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2005, 08:39:12 PM »

Sorry, I meant 80 meters. I always want to go the "wrong" way when I convert from MHz numbers to meter bands.
Logged
W5ESE
Member

Posts: 550


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2005, 07:20:59 PM »

Also consider trying for daytime contacts on 40m.
It stays open for "regional" types of QSOs for
several hours after sunrise. Saturday mornings
is a great time to look for 40m contacts.

At night, I've sometimes found some QRM-free patches
around 7106-7112 and 7148-7150 khz. Your mileage
may vary, depending on the if passband filters in
the HW8.

73
Scott
W5ESE
Logged
W5ESE
Member

Posts: 550


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2005, 07:34:41 PM »

Oh, and I forgot to mention; don't feel "stupid"
operating 6 wpm outside the Novice bands. You
don't have to confine your activity to any slow
code "leper colony". When you have the General
License, it means you have access to that level
of privileges.

As a practical matter, you'll usually encounter
slower activity higher in the band (40-60 khz
up in the band). There is a fair amount of
<13wpm activity in the General subbands; you'll
find it's easier to make QSOs when you have
General Class privileges. The Novice band
is still a good place to look, too, but no need
to confine your activity there after you
upgrade.

73
Scott W5ESE

Logged
W5HTW
Member

Posts: 729


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2005, 12:06:12 PM »

Yes, 40 meters has been full of SWBC for the 49 years I've been a ham.  And not just the Novice band, either.  

Daytime 40 meters is actually useful all day.  You won't make any DX contacts on it during the daytime, but ranges of 200 miles are common, even at one in the afternoon.  Most daytime 40 meter activity is on sideband, it seems, but CW is alive and well.  

The problem is, of course, you are limited to the Novice band.  I haven't listened to 40 meter Novice band in the day time in quite a long time, but I doubt there is much activity, if any, there.  

As a Novice, with that limitation, ham activity in the daytime, especially now as the sunspot cycle bottoms out, is just about nonexistent.  If you could operate the General section of 40, that would help a lot!  Sometimes, though, you'll find 15 meters is in pretty fair shape, so it's worth a try.

Solution?  Upgrade.  

I agree, there is little slow-speed CW activity on 20 meters.  Very little.  But there's plenty of it on 40. I don't hear much of it on 80, though the Novice band on 80 is more active than the Novice band on 40, at night.  Try that.  You'll find some slow speed CW there, and folks willing to chat.

Welcome back, by the way.  Have fun!

Ed
Logged
N8UZE
Member

Posts: 1524




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2005, 08:54:11 PM »

Check out the FISTS website.  They have calling frequencies in the Novice portions of the bands as well as the general portions and there is often someone listening.  You can also contact them and get a "code buddy" to work with.
Logged
WA9FZB
Member

Posts: 171




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2005, 06:01:56 AM »

Here's another thought -- Join us for our regular Wednesday evening CW practice net on 7.137 MHz at 1900Hrs, CST.  NCS will be K9YA, and there is a regular schedule -- First Wednesday of the month is "High Speed" night, and runs at the lowest speed of us "experienced" brass pounders.  The other weeks (second, third, fourth, and fifth if there is one) are slow speed nets.  The net runs at the lowest speed of the week's participants.  The guys who share NCS duties are experienced at matching speeds, etc.  There is a regular group of 6 or 8 stations, with check-in's welcome at any time.  NCS is in a suburb of Chicago, so most of the participants are within a few hundred miles of there.  We do, sometimes, have check-in's from as far out as Florida, etc. though.

If you can make it at 1900CST, you'd be welcome!

73
Steve  WA9FZB
Logged
KB8NMZ
Member

Posts: 8




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2005, 08:59:45 AM »

I want to thank everyone for the helpful replies!

I must have blocked the SW out of my memory, or as was suggested, maybe my attic antenna didn't pick it up as much. Currently the entire novice band is one big SW broadcast as heard on my HW8.

I will try everything that was suggested, I especially will check out that CW net.

Thanks again everyone!
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13482




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2005, 12:28:04 PM »

It may help if you turn down the RF gain on the HW-8.
Then the SWBC might not overwhelm the rest of the band
quite so much.

Besides tuning inbetween the broadcasts, I've managed
some QSOs by setting the receiver exactly zero beat to
the carrier.
Logged
NS6Y_
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2005, 12:53:51 PM »

There's always some nice slow code on 40, around 7040 is a good place to look, also 7035 and there's always CW it seems LOW on 40m, 7008 etc. I've also heard slow code on 20m but I think there's less of it.

The SW broadcasters on 40m are due to leave in a few years, and at least you dont' have to deal with the Russian Woodpecker!
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!