Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Dnns service posting gateway instead of IP address. Anybody see this??  (Read 26320 times)
WA2TTP
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« on: February 03, 2012, 10:46:44 AM »

I have an account with DynDns.com which has posted my host IP ok but last time it did on 1/27 it posted a gate way instead 255.255.255.255 which is useless. My IP is still the same so I can still access my remote station but I had to remove my host name from my apps and enter the IP address. I'am using a D link router.

Anybody see this happen??

Steve
WA2TTP
Logged
K0JEG
Member

Posts: 653




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2012, 08:13:56 AM »

It sounds like your router just isn't reporting/updating DynDNS properly. When that happens to me or my parent's router, a powercycle usually fixes it. Sometimes you'll need to log into the router and re-connect to DynDNS. Unfortunately you'll need to be onsite or have someone who can be guided over the phone on site. Also make sure your account is current, passwords are still correct, etc.

DynDNS is a hack of a solution and unfortunately doesn't always work as advertised.
Logged
WA2TTP
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2012, 09:47:52 AM »

Hi Eric,

Thanks for the reply. I have a feeling also that a reboot might force an update. I didn't set up remote access to the router before I left but I do have telephone remote control to reboot the cable modem and router together. I was reluctant to do this because my IP doesn't change that often and my remote station is working now. If I reboot and end up with a new IP and it doesn't report correctly then I'll have to have my local IT guy, aka son in law, stop by and log into the router and tell me what it is.

73,
Steve
Logged
K0JEG
Member

Posts: 653




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2012, 05:41:45 AM »

One other thing you could try: Since you can reach your remote PC (I'm assuming PC, not RemoteRig or similar), you could log into the router's setup screen from the remote PC and try to determine what's going on. Usually if DynDNS isn't synced the router will show what the error is (at least with Linksys routers).
Logged
WA2TTP
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2012, 08:07:11 AM »

Eric,

I'm using Remoterig and a Lantronix serial server to take care of my remote control, N8LP's control board, and my rotor. No PC on at the station end. If worst comes to worst I'll have my son in law stop by and see if any error messages are present. I also had an issue with a linksys router that wouldn't accept the domain name I was entering until I reloaded it's firmware. It worked after that by I replaced it with the D Link because it was about 4 years old.

Steve
Logged
K7AAT
Member

Posts: 414




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2012, 12:17:56 PM »


  For the future,  you might consider putting your modem and router power on a battery backup system.   A simple 4A 12VDC regulated charger floating a small 5 or 10AH battery would preclude momentary power outages from having an effect on your equipment.   Works for me, anyway.   
Logged
W9IQ
Member

Posts: 102




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2012, 02:56:48 PM »

Hi Steve,

You didn't say in your original post if you are using the dyndns client on a PC within your network or if your router is acting as the dyndns client. Can you clarify?

The 255.255.255.255 address likely isn't a "gateway" address although it does clearly point to a problem with your dyndns update.

- Glenn DJ0IQ and W9IQ
Logged
WA2TTP
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2012, 10:21:53 AM »

Hi Glenn,

Time flys. I'm using the Dyndns client on the D link router. It has worked in the past but just isn't updating with an IP. The IP hasn't changed since I left in January so I've been able to work around it. When I get to the end of my stay in Florida I may just do a remote reboot of the router/cable modem and see what happens.

Steve
Logged
W9IQ
Member

Posts: 102




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2012, 10:42:36 AM »

Hi Steve,

The dyndns folks did change some of their commercial terms a while back so you may want to log into their site and just make sure everything is OK with your account. It sounds however, like that shouldn't be the issue since you can still use your dyndns URL.

You may also wish to look at the dyndns web site for routers that are known to work / have problems. I have used the list in the past before making an architecture or purchase decision.

I would also suggest taking a look at the log file of your router to see if you can spot any problems there.

- Glenn DJ0IQ and W9IQ
Logged
WA2TTP
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2012, 10:30:46 PM »

Hi Glenn,

My Dyndns acct still shows the same host ip of 255. etc that is useless. I can't use the dyndns URL because of this but I know what the home IP is so I just plugged that into my Remoterig gear and the serial server software. I'm good as long as the IP doesn't change. I'll check the router log when I get home. I'm leaning toward a router glitch but as long as my station still works I don't want to reboot the router. The router sent about 3 good IP updates in Jan but after that it's been ng.
Thanks for your suggestions.

Steve
Logged
W9IQ
Member

Posts: 102




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2012, 12:32:33 AM »

Hi Steve,

Sorry for the confusion - the thread has been open for a while and I should have reread your original post.

I find that consumer grade routers (and unfortunately some of the commercial grade ones as well) often suffer from unexplained glitches that a simple power off/on cycle clears. So for routers to which I have limited access, I install a plug in the wall timer that does a brief power off/on cycle in the middle of the night when the router isn't being used. This ensures that if I lose access through the router it will fix itself in less than 24 hours.

My first incarnation of this was a PIC based processor with a relay and battery that I put inline on the secondary side of the wallwart. For less than $5 of parts, it worked very well. But then I saw that I could buy the digital wall timers with 15 minutes of granularity for the same price that did the job just as well but with less hassle. The solution works great if you can tolerate 15 minutes of regularly scheduled downtime a day in exchange for automatic recovery.

- Glenn DJ0IQ and W9IQ
Logged
WA2TTP
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2012, 08:27:17 AM »

Glenn,

That's a good idea. I may just do that next year before I go away.

Thanks,
Steve
Logged
WA2TTP
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2012, 03:21:59 PM »

When I concluded my Florida remote operations I rebooted the router and it posted a correct IP host address to the  Dyndns website within a minute.

When I got home I found out my power had been off for 2 1/2 hours during the 2 1/2 months I was away.

Thanks to those who posted suggestions.

Steve,
WA2TTP
Logged
K0JEG
Member

Posts: 653




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: April 08, 2012, 10:01:37 AM »

Glad to hear everything worked out for you. This was a good topic, I got a few tips for future reference.
Logged
WB4LCN
Member

Posts: 133


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #14 on: June 04, 2012, 02:39:36 PM »

Here's a RemotRig expert's answer to not needing to have a Static IP:

---

Mitch Wolfson DJØQN dj0qn@gmx.net
   
May 30 (5 days ago)
      
to me

Hi David,

My pleasure, just let me know if you have any further questions. I also have checklists for CAT and 3G if you need them.

Good luck & 73,
Mitch DJ0QN

1) Assuming your router is running a DHCP server (NAT) as most do, then use the Setup Manager to change the radio RRC to DHCP. Ignore what is written in the IP fields, since this is completely irrelevant.
COMMENT: The reason I suggest this step, is because the factory default uses a fixed intenal IP number that is often incompabitble with home networks (different subnet). This step makes sure that the RRC books into the network and can reach the internet.

2) Click on the Net Info tab and the get your new IP number (wait about 30 seconds). You can go from there to open up your browser and go directly to your RRC to make further changes. Note this new internal IP number (192.168.XX:YYY), it is critical for the following steps.

3) Do the same for the control RRC
COMMENT: It is critical to have the control RRC using DHCP if you intend to move this RRC around different external networks. Otherwise, it will never pull an internal IP number off of a different network and nothing will work

4) If you insist on having a different internal IP number as your router provided, I suggest that you assign the radio RRC MAC address (IP address "bind") in the router under the NAT or similar menu. This step should be unnecessary, unless you have a problem remembering the internal IP number, or if your router requires this for port forwarding or the DMZ (you can save as a bookmark in your browser).

5) Using the browser, go to the Advanced Settings and change the SIP port to something else other than 5060 (mainly because of conflicts with routers that already use this port for for VoIP).
COMMENT: This change is very important, my list is very long of those that skipped this step, only to find that it didn't work when they tried connecting from outside, because the router already used port 5060.

6) I also recommend that you change the web server port and telnet server port (radio RRC only) for the same reason. You should change the web server port from port 80, otherwise you will always land on your router directly from outside your QTH, which usually uses port 80.
COMMENT: Unless you use a VPN, this step is very important to allow you to be able to access your radio RRC when away from home to make adjustments, etc. Don't skip it!
COMMENT: If you do forward the web server port, you should place a password in the web page user and password fields (under IP settings), otherwise someone can reconfigure your RRC if they find your IP numer!

7) From that point, you need to always add the port to your web call-up, e.g. http://192.168.1.228:1234 (change your browser bookmark from step 4 above). To access your radio RRC's web interface from outside of your home network, you will need to add this port number (e.g. :1234) to the Dynamic DNS address that you use under point 11 below.

Cool Go to your control RRC and change the SIP port (SIP contact) to match the radio RRC.

9) Change the control RRC web port to a different web port, but not the same as the radio RRC (remember this number and change your browser bookmark as well!). This change is optional, since you will likely always be accessing the control RRC locally.

10) Go to your router and do only one of the following:
     a) EITHER move your radio RRC into the "DMZ" (exposed host). Your router may require the RRC to have a fixed internal IP number. If so, just do so as I described in 4) above
     b) OR else forward the ports: 12000 (UDP), 11000 (UDP), SIP port you gave (UDP) and web server port you gave (TCP). It is not necessary to forward the telnet port in most cases.
     c) Do NOT do both!!!
COMMENT: This step is very critical for the radio RRC, it won't work from outside of your network without it. Note that this is NOT necessary or recommended for the control RRC, only the radio RRC!

11) If you do not have a fixed external IP number at the radio QTH, then create a Dynamic DNS account, unless you have one already from http://www.dyndns.com/. Since DynDNS started charging for their accounts, Microbit began their own service for their products. All you need to do is to:
  - Go to the Dynamic DNS settings tab (radio RRC only)
  - Change the check interval to i.e. 10 minutes
  - Make sure the drop-down is on RemoteRig's service
  - Click on apply changes
The Microbit Dynamic DNS address is entered automatically into the "own host name" field if you use this service. If you are using DynDNS instead, then enter that address into either your radio RRC under the DynDNS settings, or into your router's DynDNS setting. Note that if you do already have a Dynamic DNS account (either paid, or an older free one) and prefer that over the one from Microbit, then I suggest you use your router's DynDNS setting if available, since it only updates if there is a change.  Never enter the same DynDNS account into both devices! Also note that the default RRC setting of 10 minute updates causes DynDNS to lock your (free) account, so change this to 24 hours.
COMMENT: Even if you believe that your external IP number never changes, make this step anyway! Your ISP can change the address on a whim, or a power outage, even for a split second, can change the address. I have had a couple of cases where this was skipped and the user could not access for several weeks until they reached the station again.

12) On the control RRC, place the information from the radio RRC's "own host name" on the Radio Settings tab under SIP contact. When testing at the same QTH as the radio, you should temporarily place the radio RRC's internal IP number into this field, just don't forget to change it when you take the RRC with you. Note that this address is WITHOUT a port suffix (like :1234), since the port is entered into the SIP contact field separately. Everything should work now. Just don't forget to use the Dynamic DNS address when not at the station, this is the #1 cause of the system not working when leaving your local network this first time!
COMMENT: Note that using the external IP address or Dynamic DNS address from inside of your network will often not work (blocked by the router), you usually must use the internal IP number. Using the internal IP address from outside of your LAN will never work!

13) All other settings are optional and MUST be the same on both RRC's, e.g. SIP password, audio quality, etc. Use the handbook to understand them. Exception: if you use the PC Client to access your radio RRC, then you can make changes in that software that makes these changes only for that session.

14) Note that I have separate checklists for setting-up remote CAT control and optimizing for 3G access or low bandwidth networks. Let me know if you need either of these.

15) Have fun!

---
Logged

First, make it work, then make it pretty.
Yaesu Rigs: Kenwood TS-480HX, FT-8900R, FTM-350AR (Bluetooth motorcycle mobile), VX-8DR, SB-102 boat anchor (built one as a kid)

Moderate Spock: "Live for a reasonable amount of time and scrape by."
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!