Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Does all large ships carry HF?  (Read 4089 times)
LB5KE
Member

Posts: 141




Ignore
« on: January 07, 2012, 03:43:04 AM »

When i see larger ships i have a habit of looking at their antennas. And on some newer ships i can't find any thing that look like a HF antenna, just VHF/UHF antennas. Are larger ships required to carry HF? Are they required to listen to 2182 kHz or is all this optional?
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4479




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2012, 05:23:47 AM »

As I understand matters, with GMDSS (Global Maritime Distress and Safety System), no radio officer as such is required, as all comms are via satellite. There is a requirement for maine VHF equipment with Digital Selective Calling (DSC) and a number of other facilities on it. There is a crew qualification for using the satellite kit. However,there were recently some HF stations in the US offering a digital message service for shipping that is much cheaper than the satellite service: I don't lknow if they are still there. One of the few HF shore stations offering public service correspondance is Stockholm Radio.
Logged
KB9CFH
Member

Posts: 9




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2012, 06:49:01 AM »

Most large ships come under the MANDITORY catagory for ship radio. If they are only on the great lakes, the inland costal waterway, or within vhf distance from shore then they use the NEWER vhf-GMDSS/DCS radios. Ocean going vessels use both satalite and HF with DIGITAL Comm. What has happened is that now instead of listening for emergency signals they use digitaly coded signals for MAYDAY , PAN-PAN, and SECURITY, and have separate signals for regular traffic. You can look under Global Maritime Distress and Signaling Systems for books and on the FCC site for the 3 GMDSS licenses, GMDSS/OP , GMDSS/Maintainer , GMDSS/OP-Maint,  also see ship radar.
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4479




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2012, 09:49:45 AM »

HF is an option for large oceangoing vessels fitted with GMDSS, except for ships sailing in polar regions, where it is mandatory.

Interesting, as polar regions are where HF can really get killed! But the satellite orbits don't cover the polar regions.
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1738




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2012, 10:11:24 AM »

We certainly have come a long way from the days of the Titanic! (100 years, this April 12th)
Logged
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1389




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2012, 04:17:48 AM »

Quite a few of the HF antennas in maritime duty are not that visible, even to the practiced eye and may only be a whip. They like to use SGC or SEA antenna tuners and radios similar to the SEA 235R or 245D series SSB transceivers. Often they will use PACTOR as a digital mode and USB SSB on HF.
Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4479




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2012, 04:29:43 AM »

HF telephone calls through Stockholm Radio are cheaper than via Inmarsat!
Logged
W8JI
Member

Posts: 9304


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2012, 07:15:54 AM »

We certainly have come a long way from the days of the Titanic! (100 years, this April 12th)

Maybe for radio technology we have.
Logged
AK4NA
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2012, 07:14:54 AM »

HF is an option for large oceangoing vessels fitted with GMDSS, except for ships sailing in polar regions, where it is mandatory.

Interesting, as polar regions are where HF can really get killed! But the satellite orbits don't cover the polar regions.

Iridium works like a champ at the poles.  All the polar orbiting satellites pass directly overhead.  Take your hand held Iridium phone out on deck and phone home.  Inmarsat will work up to about 80 degrees latitude if the antenna is up fairly high.  After that the geosynchronous satellites are too close to the horizon. 
Logged
AD4U
Member

Posts: 2157




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2012, 06:21:43 AM »

My brother-in-law is a civilian EE who contracts to the US Navy.  He goes all over the world matching HF , VHF, UHF and SHF transmitters to antennas on ships and preparing the Smith charts and signing off on the documentation required by the navy.  The US Navy requires this be done when a new ship is built, when a radio is changed out, or when an antenna is changed out.

In order to do this, he has a rather high secret clearance and he cannot talk much about what he does.  Even his cell phone cannot contain a camera. 

According to him all US Navy ships still carry HF gear, but it generally not used except as a last resort.

I do not know about commercial ships.

Dick  AD4U
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1738




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2012, 09:05:20 AM »

My brother-in-law is a civilian EE who contracts to the US Navy.  He goes all over the world matching HF , VHF, UHF and SHF transmitters to antennas on ships and preparing the Smith charts and signing off on the documentation required by the navy.  The US Navy requires this be done when a new ship is built, when a radio is changed out, or when an antenna is changed out.

In order to do this, he has a rather high secret clearance and he cannot talk much about what he does.  Even his cell phone cannot contain a camera. 

According to him all US Navy ships still carry HF gear, but it generally not used except as a last resort.

I do not know about commercial ships.

Dick  AD4U
  All American military vessels have all mode, all frequency capability.
Logged
VIPER21700
Member

Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2012, 04:36:44 PM »

As a current navy radio operator, who just came off a ship, I will say this. Every ship in the navy, ours, and others, have HF, and we use it ALOT. We use alot of data feeds using harris HF modems between Nato vessels. Most civilian ships have a mix of VHF and HF, and almost all the larger civilian ships use IMARSAT B/C satcom setups. If you look at every navy vessel, with exception of patrol boats, they have whats called an LWGA Fanwire (Light Weight Grid Array antenna)
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!