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Author Topic: Most Improved Feature Over the Years?  (Read 9621 times)
N6AJR
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« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2012, 02:10:08 PM »

most improvement  here has been in the equipment operator Smiley
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KA5IPF
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« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2012, 07:07:48 PM »

most improvement  here has been in the equipment operator Smiley

Make that "appliance" operator but that I'm not sure about. The hams I was around in the 50's built all their own gear or converted surplus military ARC5's etc. I actually knew one that had a new Drake 2B Receiver, talk about a high roller. Never knew any doctors or lawyers so never saw Collins... What frequency you on? Same one you are! Keep talking. Calling a net the net control said "net on me", never heard a specific frequency except as a general starting idea. After that it was wherever the net control was. Didn't hear a lot of cussing either. FCC got touchy about that.

Rant off.

Clif
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G3RZP
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« Reply #17 on: January 12, 2012, 02:39:20 AM »

I find autonotch useful at times on SSB. IF notch is better and useful on CW if you need it.

Not worried about frequency readout - nearest 100 Hz is good enough for most amateur operation especially at HF. Note I said readout, not drift.
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W8JX
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« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2012, 04:45:50 AM »

Amen, Auto notch.

You have to be kidding!  Autonotches are terrible compared to a manual IF notch.

Best feature-additional bands on an HF rig, like 6 and 2m!  Second best improved feature-receiver dynamic range.

73s John AA5JG

Well the auto Notch I have on 2 Kenwood rigs here works flawlessly.

Yes, but they don't work on CW, and they are only at the AF level, so you might not hear the carrier, but your receiver does and it is still pumping the AGC.  Try the manual notch on a Kenwood TS850, Yaesu FT450, or Icom 740 sometime. You will never go back to autonotch.

73s John AA5JG

Well I also AWALYS use a narrow CW filter and preamp on and off as needed as well so I rarely have a problem with AGC pumping. BTW I owned a 850 for a bit many years ago and still own a 830 with manual notch and still prefer auto notch hands down.
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K0OD
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« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2012, 07:54:26 AM »

When I started this thread I wondered what modern feature would have most blown the socks off a ham or engineer from long ago. I thought about the panadaptor but they were invented in the 30s... indeed the name came from the Panadaptor Corp in the mid-1930s. But the new ones really are great tech, and useful. 

Auto-notch??? Jeesh!  Reminds me of Mel Brooks calling Liquid Prell Shampoo the greatest invention. The others break if you drop them on your bathroom floor, he explained.

I almost never use my automatic notch filter.
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K8AG
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« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2012, 09:43:28 AM »

Solid State.  Yes I do appreciate the glowing of the tubes in my old rigs.  I have many times considered replicating my first transmitter.  2 tubes, crystal control, 40W dummy load to tune it up.  I still might do it some day.

But I spend enough time each day waiting for my computer to boot up or to finish something I set it doing.  I often talk to the coop hires, while waiting for one piece of equipment or another to finish something, about waiting for the tubes to warm up.  All of the advanced technology and we still wait on the machines.  At least the tube rigs kept you warm.

But still, I can go home tonight and crank on my new solid state rig and be on the air instantly.

Unless I use my Orion whihc seems to need time to boot up

Its all fun.  73, JP, K8AG

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W4KVW
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Posts: 476




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« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2012, 02:53:45 PM »

"REAL TIME" BAND SCOPE built INTO the radio hands down! Sure saves spinning that VFO knob & on a QUIET band lets you see the band & if ANY activity too check out! The DX Cluster gives you an IDEA "SOMETIMES" but NOT always where you are!

Clayton
W4KVW
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N9DG
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Posts: 311




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« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2012, 07:14:37 AM »

PC based SDR technology with the the display hardware SEPARATED from RF I/O hardware. It is what really makes the panadapter concept work well because it makes point and click tunning economically doable. Can only wonder if such technology was economical back when panadapters were first developed, if they would have been a lot more common a lot sooner.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2012, 08:29:58 AM »

Panadaptors seemed to drop out of fashion in the early 1950s for some reason. Probably because rx architectures of those days didn't allow a very wide span.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2012, 10:17:54 AM »

My only post here was meant to be facetious, however I would like to cast my serious vote.

I think SDR (Software Defined Radio) to be the most jaw dropping innovation yet.  I realize that SDR has only started to show its potential but I believe that in the not too distant future we will be calling the so called high-end radios we now use, "boat anchors!"

SDR is the future of radio communications.  One day in the not too distant future a ham shack will consist of nothing more than a box hidden away and a computer.

And I also believe that this will be not only be accepted but considered "normal" and the norm.
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4391




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« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2012, 04:50:54 AM »

>SDR is the future of radio communications.  One day in the not too distant future a ham shack will consist of nothing more than a box hidden away and a computer.

And I also believe that this will be not only be accepted but considered "normal" and the norm.<

And then amateur radio will only consist of 'appliance operators'. Be hard to see any difference to CB.
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W8JX
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Posts: 5470




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« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2012, 06:07:27 AM »

I almost never use my automatic notch filter.

Must not do much 40 meters were either foreign broadcasting above 7200 or AM QSO's  below that can be a issue at times. AutoNotch deals with this nicely.   
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K0OD
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« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2012, 06:44:32 AM »

Quote
Must not do much 40 meters...

I have a Flex-5000A. Work mostly CW, and 60 meters sideband where I would use its new Tracking Notch Filter which can manually stick several <<<RF>>>notches on interference... permanently if desired. The TNF works on CW too. Flex has an auto notch too.

Anyone who likes a traditional auto notch will love Flex's new tracking notch. You really have to see it in action to understand the benefits.
Demo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t17ipMS8gAk
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W2IBC
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Posts: 51




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« Reply #28 on: January 16, 2012, 02:46:24 AM »

My only post here was meant to be facetious, however I would like to cast my serious vote.

I think SDR (Software Defined Radio) to be the most jaw dropping innovation yet.  I realize that SDR has only started to show its potential but I believe that in the not too distant future we will be calling the so called high-end radios we now use, "boat anchors!"

SDR is the future of radio communications.  One day in the not too distant future a ham shack will consist of nothing more than a box hidden away and a computer.

And I also believe that this will be not only be accepted but considered "normal" and the norm.

not for me! last thing I want is my PC being my radio. 
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3669




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« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2012, 08:38:00 AM »

Quote
And then amateur radio will only consist of 'appliance operators'. Be hard to see any difference to CB.

Absolutely correct!  But, to put things in perspective, we have mostly appliance operators now!  Realistically, it is extremely difficult if not impossible for most hams to service their own gear.  Modifications are also next to impossible. How many posts have you seen on eHam.com on "how do I connect my transceiver to an amplifier?  Or how long to I cut a dipole? 

Modern day hams are reduced to building only peripherals or simple QRP gear.  I recall the much maligned Wayne Greene touting the advantages of the "one box" transceiver when most hams used separate transmitters, receivers and outboard switching circuits. 

While Wayne and I used to go round and round about some of his "ridiculous perceptions and ideas", he eventually was proven right on many of his futuristic ideas.

I saw and heard the same thing about AM vs. SSB.

Now we come to SDR and the same discussions/arguments are returning.

Quote
not for me! last thing I want is my PC being my radio.

Not to worry!  You'll get used to it!  LOL.
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