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Author Topic: Inexpensive Power Supply  (Read 3622 times)
W4YAT
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Posts: 7




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« on: January 08, 2012, 09:39:11 AM »

I'm looking for an inexpensive power supply for a Yaesu FT-1900R when using it inside the house.  Could someone offer a few suggestions for me to look at.  Is this the best route, or would a 12v gel cell serve the purpose for the occasional in home use?  I could always use the battery for other mobile applications.

Thanks in advance for the help.
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ONAIR
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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2012, 10:25:54 AM »

I'm looking for an inexpensive power supply for a Yaesu FT-1900R when using it inside the house.  Could someone offer a few suggestions for me to look at.  Is this the best route, or would a 12v gel cell serve the purpose for the occasional in home use?  I could always use the battery for other mobile applications.

Thanks in advance for the help.
  I have the Pyramid PS-14K that I have owned for over 10 years with no issues, and I think it sells for around $50 now.  You may want to consider a bigger one, like a 20 Amp or more, because you will need it if you want to power a 100 Watt HF rig from home in the future.
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K2OWK
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2012, 02:20:08 PM »

Hello KK4FKO, I have been using a Mega-Watt 30 amp power supply for about 2 years now with no problems. I power a Yaesu FT-450AT with it. I costs about $55.00 and sold on EBay from a USA listing. Check out the reviews forum for more information on this and other supplies.

Hope this helps,

73s

K2OWK
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KB0XR
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« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2012, 04:59:58 AM »

Astron.  I have 6 of them, one over 25 years old, and they all work just fine.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2012, 06:54:44 AM »

I'm looking for an inexpensive power supply for a Yaesu FT-1900R when using it inside the house.  Could someone offer a few suggestions for me to look at.  Is this the best route, or would a 12v gel cell serve the purpose for the occasional in home use?  I could always use the battery for other mobile applications.

Thanks in advance for the help.

You may want to take a few things into consideration.  First, do you intend to set up an entire shack?  If so, you may want a larger power supply that will handle all your 12 volt radios and accessories.  

If you are going to run just this rig off of the supply, then the 14 amp supply 'OWK mentioned will do nicely, since your radio draws a nominal 11 Amps when transmitting.

A best bet when choosing a power supply is to run it below its constant current rating.  In other words, never (well, almost never--there are emergencies, after all) draw more than 75 to 80 percent of the constant supply rating capacity out of it.  That way, you'll always have a little extra wiggle room--and the power supply will last longer.  And never (and this DOES mean never) draw more than its peak rated supply capacity--or you'll let out the electronic fog, and the supply won't work anymore!   Cheesy   

 

« Last Edit: January 11, 2012, 06:57:24 AM by K1CJS » Logged
K2OWK
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« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2012, 08:53:05 PM »

Hello, The supply I mentioned (Mega-Watt) is a 30 amp 100% continuous, 35 amp short duration, power supply.
         just a correction to K1CGS post.

73s

K2OWK
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W5DQ
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« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2012, 06:37:40 AM »

Quote

And never (and this DOES mean never) draw more than its peak rated supply capacity--or you'll let out the electronic fog, and the supply won't work anymore!   Cheesy   


And all this time I thought that was what the output fuse was for .....what was I thinking Smiley

Seriously, the output fuse should limit the max current draw to that the supply can safely handle. If you replace that fuse with a larger one, then the 'fog' as it is referred to (I always heard it called the magic smoke) may indeed come out!

And if your P/S doesn't have an output fuse, put one in line for the rig(s) you will use. Another suggestion if you're planning a whole shack P/S setup, get a West Mountain Radio RIGRUNNER distribution strip. Each output individually fused and a single max current draw fuse too. Well worth the money. MFJ makes a clone of these as do some others.

Gene W5DQ
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Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
K1CJS
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« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2012, 04:51:28 AM »

Sorry, Barry, I didn't look all that well.  I saw the Pyramid PS14K mentioned by someone else and mistakenly thought you had referenced it.  Apologies.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2012, 04:59:45 AM »

And all this time I thought that was what the output fuse was for .....what was I thinking Smiley

Seriously, the output fuse should limit the max current draw to that the supply can safely handle. If you replace that fuse with a larger one, then the 'fog' as it is referred to (I always heard it called the magic smoke) may indeed come out!

And if your P/S doesn't have an output fuse, put one in line for the rig(s) you will use. Another suggestion if you're planning a whole shack P/S setup, get a West Mountain Radio RIGRUNNER distribution strip. Each output individually fused and a single max current draw fuse too. Well worth the money. MFJ makes a clone of these as do some others.

Gene W5DQ

Come on now, Gene, you know as well as I do that sometimes the fuse in the line will allow more current than what it should allow through, especially if that fuse has been replaced with one that could well be not the same EXACT fuse required, even if it is the same amperage.  There is a difference between fuses rated for a certain amperage if the original fuse was also rated 32 volts, and the replacement is rated for 120 volts.  And, as you say, sometimes the wrong size fuse will be put in--purposely or not.  73!

Added--The real reason the fuse is there is to protect the unit against shorts.  Not to 'limit' the current being drawn.  (Just remembered that--duh!  Grin )
« Last Edit: January 15, 2012, 07:54:22 AM by K1CJS » Logged
W4YAT
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« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2012, 07:29:28 PM »

Thanks for all of the comments.  Good suggestions all the way around.
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NA4IT
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« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2012, 05:03:48 AM »

I use a 30 amp RV type charger supply from Cascade Audio (http://www.cascadeaudio.com/) and run it paralleled with a 150 AH battery for a total power solution. See http://www.qsl.net.na4it and scroll down the page to view the setup.
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W5DQ
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« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2012, 11:44:23 AM »


Come on now, Gene, you know as well as I do that sometimes the fuse in the line will allow more current than what it should allow through, especially if that fuse has been replaced with one that could well be not the same EXACT fuse required, even if it is the same amperage.  There is a difference between fuses rated for a certain amperage if the original fuse was also rated 32 volts, and the replacement is rated for 120 volts.  And, as you say, sometimes the wrong size fuse will be put in--purposely or not.  73!

Added--The real reason the fuse is there is to protect the unit against shorts.  Not to 'limit' the current being drawn.  (Just remembered that--duh!  Grin )

The point was that the fuse was the current limiting device in most cases.  If it is the same amperage and same type (i.e NOT A SLO-BLOW type or a alternate voltage spec'ed fuse), it should work the same regardless of the style. My point was that if someone delibrately chooses to use a LARGER/different fuse than what is spec'ed as a replacement, then they deserve to buy a new power supply, possibly a new rig and maybe even a new house if conditions warrant it.

And your are correct about types of fuses. Users need to be aware of what they have and what safe substitutes are. Knowledge is king!!

Gene W5DQ
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Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
K1CJS
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« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2012, 07:06:08 AM »

Yes, Just as you saw what I meant, I see your point.  The best rule to follow when working with low voltage equipment is this--don't depend on the fuse to protect anything except the wiring of the device it's connected to.  One other thing is a quote I saw somewhere--I forget where, but it goes something like this:  It can be almost totally assured that the $10 transistor that is protected by the 50 cent fuse will blow out first--thereby protecting the 50 cent fuse from being lost!  73!
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