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Author Topic: 2 Meter/440 handhelds - Easy of programming  (Read 3905 times)
N7GCO
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Posts: 144




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« on: January 08, 2012, 09:11:19 PM »

I know it is easy to program current 2 meter/440 handhelds connected to a computer. But for emergency use, I would like to find some that are easy to program in the field. Any recommendations?
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K9KJM
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Posts: 2415




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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2012, 10:29:41 PM »

Years ago I used to program radios with the computer, Loading in many hundreds of local and area frequencies, Simply putting the normally not used ones in "skip" or Lockout, So when scanning the radio would not lock up on unwanted channels.

I have completely changed my ways.

I now program my radios by hand,  Only putting in the two dozen or so frequencies that are normally used.   I write myself up what I call a "Cheat Sheet" with the SET numbers that are needed to program so you do not need to carry the radio manual around with you.
I have been doing it this way for several years now with great results.   
Programming by "hand" forces you to dig in and do stuff with the radio, Learning how to do it.
Once you get used to it, It goes really fast, And no computer programming is needed.

All that being said, Some radios are easier to program by hand than others.
I have found the little Yaesu VX3R really simple to program.   The Yaesu FT60 is another one that is really easy to do.

(I HAD a Yaesu VX6 and got rid of it because it was just harder for me to program)

I also picked up one of those cheap WOUXON dual band hand held radios, And had a terrible time trying to program it by hand!   At only about a hundred bucks for a brand new full power dual band radio, It DOES work great, But we wound up programming with the computer......    One to avoid for programming by hand in my opinion.
The new Baofeng dual band micro size hand held clone of the Yaesu VX3 (Which is my all time favorite hand held) Is supposed to be easy to program by hand too........   
A friend of mine has two of them on order, At only 35 bucks each......    Time will tell.
IF they program like the VX 3, I will get a few for myself for sure!
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Baofeng-UV-3R-Mark-II-V-U-Two-Freq-Dual-Band-Display-Ham-FM-Radio-Transceiver-/180790017427?pt=2_Way_Radios_FRS&hash=item2a17ecbd93
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K8GU
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Posts: 719


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« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2012, 06:08:02 AM »

Agree with K9KJM:  the VX-3R is an awesome little radio that is very easy to program in the field.
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K6LCS
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Posts: 1547


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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2012, 10:04:35 AM »

I offer several one-page "cheat sheets" on the DOCS page of my site at ...

http://www.k6lcs.com

KENWOOD Cheat Sheets
One-page programming guides for the TH-G71A, TH-F6A, TM-271A, TM-G707A, TH-D7A, TH-K2AT, and TM-D700. (106 kb .pdf)

ICOM HT Cheat Sheets
One-page programming guides for the IC-R20, IC-T2H, IC-T7H, IC-T81A, IC-T90, IC-V8, IC-U82, IC-V82, IC-W2, IC-W32, IC-Z1A. (631 kb .pdf)

ICOM Mobile Cheat Sheets
One-page programming guides for the IC-207H, IC-208H, IC-706, IC-706MKII, IC-706MKIIG, IC-910, IC-2100, IC-2720, IC-V8000. (590 kb .pdf)

And I also give online sessions on the Yaesu FT-60R ... As with many radios, once you manually program one a few times, you'll get to remember the steps involved.

You can make up your own "cheat sheet" for any radio - just wade through the manuals to locate what keypresses are needed to ...

1. Enter VFO mode
2. Enter a freq
3. Make sure the offset - if needed - is correct
4. Enter a CTCSS tone (if needed)
5. Commit all the above to a memory location

Clint K6LCS
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Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com
KQ6Q
Member

Posts: 979




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« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2012, 12:26:55 PM »

The Alinco DJV series are remarkably easy to program from the front panel -follow the instructions for the first few setups, and you've got it memorized.
The worst radio I've owned for front panel programming is my Icom T-81A  -it's got the 5-way rocker selector, and trying to press it squarely for the 5th setting, required for programming, nearly always results it the beast scanning until I power it off. I program it only from my computer!
My old Radio Shack HTX-202 and 404 are very civilized to program by hand  -there was no remote option when they were made!
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6034




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« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2012, 07:04:17 AM »

The key to it isn't the type of handheld--or even the 'ease' of programming, the key is to actually practice programming the unit until you can do it without looking at the manual.  Once you do that--and refresh your memory every so often, you'll be able to program your handheld with no problem.

AAMOF, one of the things I used to have my EmCom group do is program a few  random frequencies into their HTs at every exercise we had.  Believe me, you WILL remember how to do it if you practice it.
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KE7KTR
Member

Posts: 15




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« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2012, 12:33:48 PM »

I believe K1CJS has the key.

I have an old Icom IC-T7H that is very easy to program manually.  Doesn't have the bells and whistles of many newer models though.
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