Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: W3LPL  (Read 9594 times)
N6PSE
Member

Posts: 550


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2012, 09:31:10 PM »

This past week the W3LPL really trashed a Sked that we set up.  Our DX club donated to 3B9SP and many of them were having a tough time getting their first contact with the DXpedition.

Our propagation was basically on 20 meters at our sunset. We arranged a Sked with 3B9SP in their last days to try to contact the West Coast at 0300 UTC.  As soon as they went QRV for the Sked, the W3LPL robot posted them on DX Summit and our Sked got trounced by the many NA stations calling.   Many of us have formed some strong opinions about that robot.
Logged
NU4B
Member

Posts: 2284




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2012, 10:45:41 PM »

sure was a fuss about W3LPL for a while but I think everyone has just gotten use to it. 

Yeah, just like everyone has gotten used to hemorrhoids.  Angry
Logged
N2NL
Member

Posts: 336




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2012, 11:34:12 PM »

I for one really appreciate the W3LPL spots.  It has helped me many times to locate new ones on 80/40/30m - Caribbean stations that get on in the middle of the night in NA when no one is on stateside (early evening here), and otherwise would not have been spotted.  It is also a propagation indicator, granted one with very good antennas.

I feel that guys get too uptight about packet.  There is a ton of garbage spotted - broken calls, a DX spot announcing "QSL card received", ETC.  The W3LPL robot for the most part does a very good job spotting valid DX, better than many human spotters.  Why do the LPL spot haters hate the LPL spots?  Because it got tricked by a human?  You and I both know HK0NA and T32C are not QRV - so why get spun up when someone messes around?  Just ignore the bad spots.  If it's because you have alarms set up with your needs, and you got woken up at 3AM for a bogus spot, then I think you may have another problem all together Smiley

Too many guys rely too heavily on packet spots.  Click, point, and shoot - no listening required.  This is one reason the pileups have gotten so chaotic.

73, Dave KH2/N2NL
Logged
KE8G
Member

Posts: 151




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: October 25, 2012, 03:44:42 AM »

For quite a while, I was bothered by W3LPL's spots only because his system could hear so well and 9 times out of 10, I was not able to hear the spotted station.  I have a pretty decent station; a couple of K3 radios, KPA500 amps, a nice tower with a few yagis on it, but no way does it hear as well.

I think there are many hams who benefit from his spotting network.  I think he's invested a lot of time and money in his system and let's admit it... it DOES work very well.  Yes, at times it does fall victim to the lids out there who think they are being funny, but then again, I bet if a human picked up a bogus call it would just as quickly be spotted.  I do think W3LPL's system is extremely accurate and I would believe that spot more quickly than some of the others that get posted.  Case in point, how many times does some one put up a spot of P48ADI, rather than the correct PV8ADI?  Not the "robot", it's always correct.

I have finally learned how to live very well with the W3LPL spots, I just ignore them!  I use the DXLab suite of programs and with it, I am able to filter out any incoming spots from said station.  As for web based spotting, I have just trained my eyes to pass over those spots. 

Life is too short to get all worked up about something as simple as this.  It's a hobby, nothing more, nothing less!

73 de Jim - KE8G
Logged
K3STX
Member

Posts: 993




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2012, 11:40:46 AM »

The people who complain about the W3LPL robot do so not because they find the spots WRONG. And not because they find the spotted DX hard to hear on their attic dipole. I think the objection is not really with W3LPL, the objection is with the nature of spotting networks/clusters themselves. In the old days we would across rare DX calling CQ, or come across that rare DX just finishing QSO #1 before a pile-up begins. With "humans" doing the spotting, someone actually HEARING the QSO would post the spot. You had some time as a "non-computerized" DXer, since odds are few people heard the QSO and even less are anxious to spot it. NOW the W3LPL robot scans the bands and immediately spots the DX possibly with no single human on the planet actually hearing the CQ at all!. I think people are taking their frustration out on Frank, it is an easy target since the spots are so omnipresent. I think the frustration is that his robot makes it very difficult to "stumble" upon rare DX. Not impossible, just more difficult.   Maybe I am wrong about this. But this is MY objection to robot spotting.

I wish there were no DX spotting networks. Of course I can turn off my computer, that won't stop the "problem" of immediate and immense pile-ups once spotted. EVERYONE would have to agree to not look at spots; that ain't gonna happen.

paul
Logged
K7KB
Member

Posts: 607




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: October 25, 2012, 01:50:27 PM »

I wish there were no DX spotting networks. Of course I can turn off my computer, that won't stop the "problem" of immediate and immense pile-ups once spotted. EVERYONE would have to agree to not look at spots; that ain't gonna happen.

paul

I agree Paul. Spotting networks have taken a lot of the fun out of DX'ing. Now you see a cluster spot "CLICK", your transceiver is on the Band/Mode. You work them, it's in the log. Now working 200 or so countries in less than a year is easy when someone else does the work for you. It would be nice if the DX clusters did not exist, but they do, so we deal with it. I still enjoy just tuning around the bands to see what I can find.

John K7KB
Logged
K0YHV
Member

Posts: 179




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2012, 07:49:04 PM »

I agree with the previous posts that the automatic W3LPL spots remove any chance of finding a rare one calling CQ or working a couple of QSO without a piluep, because it finds them and immediately the pileup is there.  Guess I need to run more RTTY or (heaven forbid) SSB!

John AF5CC
Logged
K6UJ
Member

Posts: 313




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2012, 08:01:07 PM »

I agree with the previous posts that the automatic W3LPL spots remove any chance of finding a rare one calling CQ or working a couple of QSO without a piluep, because it finds them and immediately the pileup is there.  Guess I need to run more RTTY or (heaven forbid) SSB!

John AF5CC


I agree John.  But run SSB ?  Lets not give up what dignity we have left.   Grin Grin

73,
Bob
K6UJ
Logged
K4JK
Member

Posts: 302




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: October 26, 2012, 05:22:57 AM »

The W3LPL robot is just a conspiracy by equipment manufacturers to encourage more hams to purchase 1500 watt amplifiers and expensive antenna arrays.

Logged

ex W4HFK
NU1O
Member

Posts: 2690




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: October 26, 2012, 05:27:38 AM »

The W3LPL robot is just a conspiracy by equipment manufacturers to encourage more hams to purchase 1500 watt amplifiers and expensive antenna arrays.



It seems to be working.

73,

Chris/NU1O
Logged
K0YHV
Member

Posts: 179




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: October 26, 2012, 05:39:34 PM »

I thought the equipment manufactures arranged for the extended solar minimum we had for the same reason.

John AF5CC
Logged
HS0ZIB
Member

Posts: 424




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: October 26, 2012, 09:34:10 PM »

Quote
I wish there were no DX spotting networks

I'm not a luddite, but I agree 100%.  IMHO, spotting networks are the primary reason for pile-ups and bad operating behaviour on the bands.

There is something you can do about it - remove your call-sign from the spotting networks.  I requested that my own call-sign be not reported by DXWatch, and now anyone who tries to post a spot of my signal will never see that spot 'in print'. The reason?  I firmly believe that DXing should be done through one's own individual effort of calling CQ and tuning the dial, not being led like a baby to where the signal and chaos is.

It's even easy to fool the PSK skimmers, just don't call using 'CQ de...'

Now I enjoy the satisfaction of QSOs with 'little pistol' stations and others who have made their own efforts to tune the bands Smiley

Simon
Logged
W4VKU
Member

Posts: 348




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: October 27, 2012, 08:16:13 AM »

The W3LPL robot is just a conspiracy by equipment manufacturers to encourage more hams to purchase 1500 watt amplifiers and expensive antenna arrays.



W3LPL spots are at times helpful. We don't hear many of those spots, but at times yes they are and it helps to nab a
new band fill. So we just turn on the mental filters, but am sure it flags a false positive and causes un-necessary
anxiety to folks that have setup notification mechanisms that sends them alerts to their mobile device etc.

73s
krish
w4vku
Logged
NU1O
Member

Posts: 2690




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2012, 06:01:31 AM »



I'm not a luddite, but I agree 100%.  IMHO, spotting networks are the primary reason for pile-ups and bad operating behaviour on the bands.


I don't like the spotting networks and preferred things the old way but it is not fair to blame the spotting networks on bad behavior.  There was plenty of that when there were no spotting networks.

The spotting networks lead to almost instantaneous pileups but if there was rare DX on the band the pileups eventually ensued it just took us longer.  The biggest difference is the ability to find rare CW DX even if you are primarily a Phone operation.  Today you'd also have to outlaw panadapters which show where the pileups are.  Mine doesn't have the ability to cover a whole band but some do.

I don't see anyway of going back to the old days.

73,

Chris/NU1O

73,

Chris/NU1O
Logged
NU4B
Member

Posts: 2284




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: October 28, 2012, 07:49:20 AM »



I'm not a luddite, but I agree 100%.  IMHO, spotting networks are the primary reason for pile-ups and bad operating behaviour on the bands.


I don't like the spotting networks and preferred things the old way but it is not fair to blame the spotting networks on bad behavior. 

Why sure its fair - as much as its fair for you people to blame others' bad behavior on any other third party.

If there were no spotting clusters, many wouldn't even be DXers - because they can't do it without somebody else doing it for them. Also there wouldn't the intensity or the instantaneous pileups, excessive power, and the desire for excessive power X2. Today I was listening to T6LG and he gave out a change of freq. Before I could get there W3LPL already had it spotted. It was funny, though, that the vast majority didn't know about the freq change until after it was spotted - even though he repeated it twice.
As far as a pandapter - that's part of your station. If there were no spotting networks you wouldn't be broadcasting your pandapter info to the world. It's like having an amp or a great antenna - just another station accessory for DXing.

No, the spotting clusters aren't going away. But maybe a chunk of the "DXers" will when they realize they are just like the third team going in at the end of the fourth quarter to do mop up duties after the A team won the game. I doubt many of today's "DXers" really get DXing, and since they don't, they will eventually get bored and disappear.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!