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Author Topic: Butternut HF9V  (Read 1136 times)
KB7QND
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Posts: 43




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« on: January 13, 2012, 05:12:29 PM »

I just assembled and raised a new Butternut HF9V with the ground radial kit.

I can easily get a 1:5 to 1:1 on 6m and 40m.  All other bands SWR is 3:1 to off the scale.

I've tried every adjustment in the manual and reverified every step of the construction process.  I've adjusted each element the manual says to adjust going full scale in both directions with no changes in SWR.

Anyone have this antenna that went through a similar process that might be able to provide some insight???

In case anyone asks, I'm using new coax (LMR-400 from Cable Xperts) and verified connectivity of the coax and at every connection....all good.  Ground soil here is rock with desert sand (Arizona desert). 
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AD6KA
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Posts: 2238




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« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2012, 06:32:02 PM »

How many & how long ground radials do you have down?
73, Ken  AD6KA
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K5LXP
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2012, 07:59:42 AM »

What "radial kit" are you using?  How high is the feedpoint above ground?  Are you using an analyzer or an SWR meter/transmitter to make your measurements?

An HF9V can be a bit "involved" to tune even for someone with experience.   Throw in a few variables like an elevated feedpoint and you can be off into the weeds in a hurry.  If your tuning points are outside the ham bands and you're using a transmitter with an SWR meter it can be very difficult to know what to adjust and how far.  An analyzer really, really makes a big difference here.  Setting up 80 and 40M is pretty straightforward, but some bands interact and some are pretty touchy so it takes a few passes to get everything zeroed in perfectly.

Stick with it.  While they're a bit fussy to set up initially they're a decent antenna and have many faithful followers.  They've been sold in one flavor or another since the '70's.  My butternut vertical will turn 25 this year.  I have helped dozens of hams over the years tune these things up after they've declared them "impossible".

There is an excellent yahoo group for butternut antennas with a friendly membership and good resources in the files section.  There is no issue with these antennas that cannot be solved with the help of these folks.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM



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