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Author Topic: Testing Question...  (Read 361 times)
KF4KLZ
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Posts: 53




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« on: October 19, 2005, 05:24:23 PM »

When the test is administered, If you miss a few letters. can you go back after the code is played and fill in ones that you may know fit?  Say the work is 'homebrew' and you coppied 'ho ebrewed'.  Or once the code is played, that is it...

I have been using code quick and playing it on the software @ 6wpm as I go.  Gets a bit frustrating - wonder if I shouldn't just keep it at 5 till I get all of the charecters completed...
Thanks for any help!
Sean
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K5CQB
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Posts: 223




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« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2005, 08:29:53 PM »

Sean,
     Yes, you should be able to go back and fill in any missed characters.  I am not familiar with Code Quick but whatever program you use I suggest that you learn via the farnsworth method.  Learn the characters played at 20-25 wpm with 5 wpm spacing between characters.

73,
Jim, K5CQB
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N0IU
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Posts: 1236


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« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2005, 01:23:07 AM »

Most VE sessions will allow either 1 minute of "perfect" copy which is 25 characters (and they should give you a few minutes to look over your paper before you turn it in) or by passing a 10 question test (most use fill in the blank) in order to pass the test.

Keep in mind that numbers, prosigns (AR, SK, KN, etc.) and punctuation count as 2 characters.

Good luck!
NØIU
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N3EF
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Posts: 247




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« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2005, 03:56:43 AM »

 I agree with Sean, as the tests are given with a character speed of 15wpm with spacing between characters to achieve an overall speed of 5wpm (Farnsworth method). If you use the G4FON software, you can use these settings.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20540




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« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2005, 08:51:19 AM »

Use whatever method works for you.

But if you ever want to actually *use* code and become a CW operator, you'll find that you don't ever need to write anything down.  Just listen to the code like it's a language, and get it.  If you hear hom??rew in a sentence, your brain will fill in the blanks, you don't have to write them.

WB2WIK/6
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N5XM
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2005, 01:17:44 PM »

Sean, it's good to hear of your interest in CW.  At first, I think you will have to write things down.  I do this to get the call, name, and QTH, and the RST, but after that it's all head copy.  Don't worry about being able to do this at first.

I've done VE CW testing for the last 6 years, and the way to pass the test with flying colors is to first learn the elements of a typical CW QSO, and recognize they come in a general order.  Learn to recognize the prosigns, and remember that the info coming after the prosigns answers the questions.  When you hear the prosign QTH, know that a city and state comes directly next.  When you hear RST, know that 3 numbers are to follow.  These two prosigns are like roadmaps to you.  You know that callsigns come at the beginning and at the end, so that's 3 questions you know already.  So you're looking at callsigns first, RST 2nd or 3d, name 2nd or 3rd (not a prosign as such, but consider it as one because the person's name comes after "name").  Somewhere in there in the very first part of the QSO will be the prosign QTH. At that point you have 4 of 7 answers correct if you use this manner of organizing your thinking.  

At that point, try to recognize "rig" as a prosign, because you know when you hear those letters, the person on the other end will be telling you what kind of rig they have.  What would you expect to come after that?  If you just found out what kind of rig is being used, next expect the power of that rig and then the kind of antenna and its' elevation.  That's 8 correct answers and you have passed, and the QSO is not even over.  WX is a prosign for weather, and when you learn to recognize that, expect sky conditions, rain, snow, whatever, and the temp.  All is left at that point in a test QSO is why the person must QRT, then callsigns and it's done.  When you understand there is a general order of items in a test QSO, you can have a bit of confidence.  This is a pre-test strategy you can school yourself on BEFORE the real test!  Good luck.  Richard, n5xm
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N5NA
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Posts: 217




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« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2005, 01:36:58 PM »

The VE team I am on allows 1 minute (or maybe it's 30 seconds, I can't remember right now) after the test is over for the applicant to review the text and make any corrections.

Nothing scientific but it seems like most of those taking the code test in sessions I have attended pass the test on one minute of solid copy vs. passing the 10 question test.

73, Alan N5NA
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N8UZE
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Posts: 1524




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« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2005, 03:42:39 PM »

VE teams that I have been on allow you as much time as you want to review your copy unless it's something unreasonable.  I imagine 1/2 an hour would not be allowed!
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KF4KLZ
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Posts: 53




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« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2005, 07:36:38 PM »

Thank you all for the help!  
I am up to 12 letters and rolling.  I also bought a code oscillator off of e-bay and think sending will help a lot.  Any time I do a presentation for work, I write it out as well as practice, practice, practice.  I have also benn putting letter on the software - the ones I seem to get wrong.  

For anyone who uses/used code qwik, do you find yourself not going thru the little phrases and the letters just start to pop in your head? Seems like the phrases start to get in the wat a bit - not so much at 5wpm but when you try a bit faster.
Sean
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