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Author Topic: Shortening words  (Read 9210 times)
N3JJT
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Posts: 31




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« Reply #30 on: February 13, 2012, 04:56:31 PM »

Kris:  It seems to me that you are hung up on how fast you are not going.  Getting on the air each day and doing a couple of QSOs will change that on its own.  A comment made earlier makes sense as far as the practice side of things go.  Not one of us here picked up the key for the first time and was doing 20 wpm.  We started slow and built our speed thru time.  Take the time to enjoy each qso.  If you are in a hurry, then you probably do not have time to have a qso to begin with.  Enjoy the mode, and and enjoy meeting all of the new folks out there.  There is always someone around to work.  use common abbreviations.  Most ops are listening for words that are in common conversations.  Someday you will only be writing down the log info, and copying the rest in your head.   That is when the enjoyment begins.  I read your example, and I think I might have sent you a couple of question marks, and agn?  Have fun, and welcome to CW!

73..N3JJT..Scott
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KB4MB
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Posts: 295




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« Reply #31 on: February 14, 2012, 04:40:11 AM »

Yeah Scott, I didn't want to divert this thread - it is just that I have been restudying the letters about two years ago (learned as a novice, but through a printed table), but then I couldn't keep up with it due to a shoulder surgery.  I relearned the characters and was stuck due to head counting.  Last year some time I finally at least got the courage to get on the air, but due to work and my farm, I just didn't find time to dedicate to the code every day like I should/could have.

I also focused my free time on making the best station I could, erecting antennas, a tower, ground system, radials, etc.

Then I started practicing in the car for the last few months, and while that has helped some, it feels like the energy I have invested, I would at least past a general code exam - I still wouldn't be able to.  Breaking the lookup table and sounding letters out as I miss them has been hard.  Plus I am always thinking about code - obsessing a bit, actually.

I have vowed to try to make at least one CW contact a day, more if possible, even if it is short.  I also practice in the car while driving still.  Still at about 10-11wpm...  I know I will get there, but I would like to be at 20wpm at some point, and certainly would like to be better than where I am at.

However, if you look in my log, there is probably only 30 CW contacts, so what do I expect?  I know it will come in time, I just am frustrated, especially since by time the standard QSO stuff is done, it is usually time to get off the rig and go back to work, or at least spend time with the wife.

Having said that, I do enjoy each QSO and it is still a blast that something I am tapping here is making sense and just floating in the air and some beeps in return make sense to me and I am communicating with someone through magic.
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K3STX
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Posts: 1055




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« Reply #32 on: February 14, 2012, 05:31:40 AM »

Still at about 10-11wpm... 

Nothing to sneeze at there. EVERY  QRQ op started out just like you; at the beginning. Just have QSOs when you can, as often as you can (as long as it is enjoyable to you), and you will be up to 20-30 wpm before you know it. But it takes SOME  TIME and the change will be so gradual you will not even notice it. It will happen automatically and you won't have to force it.

It's just like your kids growing up: one day they are 3 years old (your 10 wpm) and before you know it they are out of the house (your 30 wpm).

paul
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WB3CQM
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Posts: 122




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« Reply #33 on: February 14, 2012, 06:07:24 AM »

I found a great site with lots of great information on copy of Morse code.

http://qrqcwnet.ning.com/

I have also down loaded the software QRQ and am very impressed with it. Not only the call sign practice but also the word practice.

What I believe now, is I learned the wrong way in 1975/76 to copy code and this site offers a better way to learn.

Before you go too much further, you probably should read, re-read, and re-re-read "The Art and Skill of Radio Telegraphy," by Bill Pierpont, N0HFF,   http://www.qsl.net/n9bor/images/The%20Art%20&%20Skill%20of%20Radio-Telegraphy%203rd%20edition%204-02.pdf  That book will steer you away from MUCH wasted effort!

73 JIM

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KB4MB
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Posts: 295




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« Reply #34 on: February 14, 2012, 06:46:26 AM »

Thanks for the links, Jim.

I am re-reading N0HFF's book again (2nd or 3rd time, can't remember)...

At the moment, I am not looking for killer head copy (30+wpm), but I would love to headcopy at the Extra level.  Has nothing to do with feeling validated or anything like that - more like, if that was the standard, everyone must have thought that it was possible for those who worked for it.

It is funny, two days ago, 10wpm, and I felt I had to pay strict attention.  Yesterday during a QSO, it just felt relaxed.  However, I know once we veer from standard QSO territory, my copy percentage drops to 70% (maybe less?).... so I know I still have work to do at 10wpm before I move up.

As you read these posts on here, or websites, or N0HFF's book, it seems like you can just start at 20wpm and get there in the same amount of time that if you start at 10wpm, and you should just skip 10 and go right for 20...  I have tried that, and at least for me, it just doesn't hold true.  Now I do believe that to be the case for 10wpm, though (skip 5wpm!) - Characters at 15 or 18wpm and slowed down to 10wpm.  It seems Steve did that while he got his students comfortable when he taught them.

Same with Koch - I know so many success stories with that method - but that didn't really work for me - it felt unnatural and like I was tied to the keyboard, which is another process.  I bet for mill copy that works great, but that is not what I am after, either. 

What seems to work, is getting on the air... which is what I guess everyone is saying. Smiley

BTW, two posts from the past about the original topic:

Been a CW guy for about 50 years, and "tre" is a new one on me (hi).

The standard for making abbreviations (in English) has been to drop vowels from words, as they are easily restored in your mind.  This is in addition to the "normal" list of abbreviations, some of which have more than one abbreviation for a word.  PLS/PSE for please, TKS/TNX for thanks, etc.  However, when in doubt, spell it out (hi).

Some of us "OF's" still use those Q-signals mentioned previously.  QRA, QSA, QRV, etc., all still have a place in CW.

And PLEASE, don't forget pro-signs!  DE, K, AR, SK, CL, etc. They were developed for a reason!

The current fad seems to be to just do what you want, even if it makes no sense.  I.E.  Sending "CQ CQ K7UNZ K7UNZ"  Means you're calling anyone (CQ) and also K7UNZ, but you never identify your own station (DE -----) or ask for a reply (K).  Duh!  Wonder why you don't get many answers?

OK, off the soap box....no, I'm not perfect either!

73, Jim/k7unz


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WX7G
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Posts: 6214




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« Reply #35 on: February 14, 2012, 09:19:29 AM »

Experienced CW ops are used to the STANDARD word abbreviations. Our minds latch onto them and can detect them below the noise level.

Making up new abbreviations is not appreciated. They are MUCH harder to copy than sending the whole word that we are familiar with.


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K3STX
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Posts: 1055




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« Reply #36 on: February 14, 2012, 06:42:58 PM »

As you read these posts on here, or websites, or N0HFF's book, it seems like you can just start at 20wpm and get there in the same amount of time that if you start at 10wpm, and you should just skip 10 and go right for 20... 

Old guys like me (a whopping 49 now) who started as little kids (age 13) got an ARRL Handbook, a Radio Shack Code Practice Oscillator and cheap plastic key, and just SENT to ourselves. All alone. For HOURS AND HOURS. I listened to my sending, and I listened some more, and I practiced sending, and listened on the air on my fancy Hallicrafters S-20R. I remembered that 4 dots was an "H" and 2 dashes was an "M", etc... I did it (evidently) COMPLETELY wrong. I was even dumb enough to LISTEN to 5 wpm code and tried to emulate it. And then as a Novice, I actually HAD QSOs at 5 wpm. And you know what? For all my "Bad habits" and learning the non-Koch non-Farnsworth way I managed to make it to be a QRQ op.

There is only one way to get good at CW, and that is practice. Koch/Farnsworth is all bull. Practice, no matter how you do it, is what will make you good. When I teach my son, I will teach him the dot letters (E, I, S, H), the dash letters (T, M, O) and then the dot-dash combos of A, W, J and dash-dot combos of N, D, B. And I will make lots of words with those letters until he recognizes the words (and can send them). He will have FUN recognizing the words we send back and forth (maybe even from his room over to mine with a CPO). THEN I will teach him additional letters. That might be STUPID, but it worked for me and thousands before me and it will work for him too. This idea that there is a right way and a wrong way is over-analyzing and trying to make something that is somewhat difficult "slightly" less difficult! Learning Morse takes effort. Period. Practice makes perfect.

You are well on your way, I am really happy for you. CW is the only mode I have ever operated and it NEVER gets boring, I see no reason to try any other mode. if I were to give you any advice I would say don't overthink any of this, just have fun and it will just come naturally.

paul
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KB4MB
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Posts: 295




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« Reply #37 on: February 15, 2012, 04:36:20 AM »

Thanks for the words of encouragement, Paul!

I think it will come, because lately I have been dreaming of QSO's, and I hear dits and dahs in my head during the day - normal SeeDubbau-itis, I believe...
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K7KBN
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« Reply #38 on: February 15, 2012, 07:18:03 AM »

As far as "shortening words" goes, the words "partially hydrogenated vegetable oil" appear on Crisco cans and many other brands of shortening ... does that help?   Grin  Wink
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K3STX
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Posts: 1055




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« Reply #39 on: February 15, 2012, 08:00:53 AM »

Believe me, you will soon be at the point when you don't even think you are hearing "code" and you won't have to decode it. You will be hearing a "voice" speaking to you.

paul
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K5TTE
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #40 on: February 16, 2012, 11:10:58 PM »

One of the funniest abbreviations came my friend Scott N6MI.
He calls it "the sardonic laugh" or "bored laughter".
To wit: if laughter is expressed by "HI" or dit dit dit dit / dit dit
then the sardonic laugh is sent as follows:

"dit dit dit dit  /      dit       /                            dit." ,

followed by a long pause..........
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KB4MB
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Posts: 295




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« Reply #41 on: February 21, 2012, 08:50:43 AM »

Found another post on where I picked up shortening things:

I'm pretty active on CW and don't hear much "gibberish" at all.  There are some bad fists, but I think 90% are fine.

Checking your hearing might be a good suggestion, but also are you sure you're not just listening to guys using lots of abbreviations instead of plain text?  That's really common, I do it all the time.

fer exmpl hw id snd mny thgs mite b lik ths

Most hard-core CW ops would copy that just fine.
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