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Author Topic: Keyer Suggestions  (Read 4895 times)
VE3GNU
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Posts: 83




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« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2012, 06:12:10 AM »

Bill---Have a look at the Palstar Keyer---model CW50A.  It has all the functions on the front panel that you need---i.e. Speed, Volume, and Pitch, Power, Tune.
It's a 'stand-alone' model that can be powered by a 9V battery---is well-built and quality piece of gear.
GL---Ernie VE3GNU
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W3OWL
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2012, 09:57:30 AM »

OK, we have made some progress here.  For those of you who have followed my semi-interesting saga of key and keyer difficulties, I am happy to report that, after a little investigation, I discovered the connection cable (supplied with the key) was wired opposite from what is shown in the instruction guide which came with the key.  The K8RA model P6 manual shows the biding posts connected like this (when facing the key in the normal operating position, looking left to right): red-white-black.  Since we are always instructed to "just read the directions, the manual is your friend", that's the way I connected the spade lugs to the screw terminals on the P6.  When I tried the P6 with the Icom 718, I had the same problem as with the keyer; only one side of the key was producing a tone.  I figured that the problem  was either with the key and/or the connecting cable.  I unscrewed the barrel of the 1/4" plug and discovered that the red & white wires were reversed (black was OK).  So I simply attached the spade plugs like this on the key: white-red-black.........bingo !  Turns out the photo in the instruction showed an incorrect conection.  I'm still not crazy about the little Pico keyer, but I'll give it a few weeks.  And I still need to convince myself that CW is going to be my "thing."  If not, I'll either sell my CW stuff or donate it to the local school club.  Anyway, many TNX to everyone for their suggestions. W3OWL
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K3STX
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Posts: 956




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« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2012, 06:25:49 PM »

I am really happy for you that you got that MAJOR problem figured out! I was worried that you had it wired with a simple MONO plug; if that were the case the keyer would be in straight key or bug mode, not what you want!! You COULD have simply chosen to REVERSE the dot and dash keys (from the menu), but what you did was fine.

It is a great little keyer, and most importantly its keying is GREAT even at high speeds. Most internal keyers in rigs suck, they really have problems above 40 wpm. The Pico-Keyer will do 60 wpm without a sweat.

Keep the keyer, and do yourself a favor, put a BIG KNOB on that pot that controls speed! Instead of that little skinny 1/4" wide "knob" I have  a 2 inch knob. Now THAT is a man-sized keyer knob. Have fun and PLEASE don't give up. And if you EVER feel like "giving it away" give me a buzz, I will buy it and install it in one of my QRP rigs.

Great job on the detective work!

paul
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W3OWL
Member

Posts: 5




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« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2012, 06:19:13 AM »

Thanks Paul.  Yes, the Pico keyer has a very teensy knob and is difficult to adjust with any accuracy.  I have some extra knobs laying around here and will try to slip one over this little one.  Now I just need to build upon my ancient CW skills with the P6 key; I have only used straight keys in the past.  Thanks again for everyone's help and suggestions.  73.  Bill
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K3STX
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Posts: 956




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« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2012, 08:03:05 AM »

The memories are also great. I program a CQ into mine, have not changed it in years. (although now I normally use a bug for ragchewing.

I think a bigger knob will make you happier.

paul
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W2UP
Member

Posts: 7




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« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2012, 07:17:03 AM »

I've used many keyers over the years and my favorite is the Island Keyer II by Jackson harbor Press.  It has more features and memories than you'll know what to do with and the price is great.
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W3OWL
Member

Posts: 5




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« Reply #21 on: March 11, 2012, 06:12:09 AM »

Thanks for the suggestions on the Island Keyer.  I'll do a little research.  I added a larger knob on the Pico Keyer, but I still don't like this little keyer that much.  Overly complicated menu; if I make a mistake and miss the function I want, then I must run through everything again.  Speed control is very touchy, going from slow....fast....faster....faster.... then is starts slowing down again as it reaches full clockwise rotation.  However, I am making some real progress with relearning my ancient CW skills, so you may hear me on the bands soon, but probably with a different keyer.  TNX. Bill. W3OWL
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PA0BLAH
Member

Posts: 0




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« Reply #22 on: March 11, 2012, 09:36:34 AM »

Please excuse my American English, it is hard to decipher, somebody wrote on this website recently, and it is not your hamspirit to decipher it but my hamspirit to try you give the advice you asked for.

Buy a 8 pin DIL chip K12 from K1EL he charges you 5 bucks for it and you are all sat.

The circuits and the manual are available for free on his website. It has possibilities to correct delays (shorting) of dits and dashes at the start of a transmission. and the like.

You can key positive and negative keyed transmitters, also vacuum tube keyed ones.

You can build the chip in your tranceiver or make a separate keyer. There are memories which include escape sequences for commands. And a wide selection of keying modes are available, including of course iambic A and B.

Bob
« Last Edit: March 11, 2012, 09:38:37 AM by PA0BLAH » Logged
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