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Author Topic: Similarities of Wave Behaviour  (Read 1279 times)
N4CR
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Posts: 1655




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« on: March 29, 2012, 09:57:33 PM »

Not much has changed since 1959.

Every ham should understand how this all works.

http://techchannel.att.com/play-video.cfm/2011/3/7/AT&T-Archives-Similarities-of-Wave-Behavior
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
K0OD
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Posts: 2533




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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2012, 11:52:08 PM »

Fabulous. Thanks!
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N0YXB
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Posts: 303




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« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2012, 01:55:25 PM »

Very cool, thanks for posting.
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Vince
AE5QB
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Posts: 267




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« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2012, 02:37:21 PM »

Very nice indeed.  I need one of those wave generators for my classroom.  Has anyone seen one before?

I like these old movies. I remember watching the Johnny Electron movies as a teenager.  I can't recall where I watched them, maybe it was in Navy basic electronics school.   After all we have learned in the past 20 years, it amazes me how much we (me not included) knew back then.  Even as far back as Isaac Newton, Galileo, and Copernicus. they were really really smart dudes to come up with the discoveries they made.  I guess we are still learning amazing things daily, but a good deal of it is on a quantum level beyond the reach of most everyday laypersons.  It is a challenge to get my classroom students excited about quarks and gravitons the way we were excited about rockets and going to the moon.

73

AE5QB

 
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KE4VVF
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« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2012, 09:16:12 PM »

Love it.  Very informative.
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N4CR
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Posts: 1655




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« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2012, 10:43:36 PM »

Very nice indeed.  I need one of those wave generators for my classroom.  Has anyone seen one before?

The closeups were very revealing.

It looked to me like the rods and center wire were a bunch of 1/8" brass rods and a piano wire down the middle. Probably drilled in one jig, set in the next jig to align the rods and thread the wire. Then a smack with a small punch or ball pein hammer at the brass/wire junction would make that permanent.

The trestle assembly was interesting but it looked like the piano wire in the wave portion just sat on a cross piece of wire in the trestle.

It would take some experimenting to find the right diameter of piano wire, but should not be very hard to do build one. Obviously, the motor with the wheel on it was home made as was the damper and the fixed clamp.
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2533




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« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2012, 05:33:43 AM »

That device is called a Shive wave machine. It was developed by Bell Labs in the 50s.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shive_wave_machine

A term I wasn't familiar with was dashpot:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dashpot

How to build your own wave machine with duct tape
http://www.dailybits.com/duct-tape-wave-machine/

Even Popular Electronics' Carl and Jerry built one in 1961:
http://home.gwi.net/~jdebell/pe/cj/v15-6.htm


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