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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: Soldering Help  (Read 7285 times)
N1OD
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Posts: 56




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« Reply #30 on: February 21, 2012, 04:21:01 AM »

KD0PLD, check your private messages.

Paul
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3753




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« Reply #31 on: February 21, 2012, 08:10:56 AM »

RZP:  I think perhaps you're in the same boat as I am.  My pegboard looks like a Radio Shack store but when I need a part I have to either order it or go back to Radio Shack because I can't find it.

A similar situation occurred in the power plant where I worked.  They used to bring in skids full of valve wrenches and they would disappear into every nook and cranny in the place.  Each person wanted one hidden away for easy access when he had a problem with a valve.

The problem was we could never find one when we needed it!

I always said, if we suffered an earthquake, valve wrenches would rain down through the 12 floors!
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4477




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« Reply #32 on: February 22, 2012, 02:02:48 AM »

I just blame my cats for it all. After all, they blame me for the weather and everything else. And I'm sure they drink the whiskey!
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N4RCK
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #33 on: March 12, 2012, 04:30:38 PM »

 The  best  method  to use on  any  pl259  is  carbon resistance.
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VK4TJF
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Posts: 93




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« Reply #34 on: March 13, 2012, 10:51:42 AM »

i like using RG-213 for all except mobile situations, when i first tried to solder pl 259 plugs it was a pain, a real job
that is until i found some quality pl-259 connectors and not some junk you find at the local electronics store
get your connectors from dx enginnering as they have high quality silver and tephlon connectors, very easy to solder
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KC2MMI
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Posts: 621




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« Reply #35 on: March 13, 2012, 03:53:18 PM »

I would also suggest buying a tube of "Solder-It" or similar soldering paste instead of conventional solder. It has an expiration date, lasts about 12-18 months before turning solid in the tube so check the date when you buy it.

If you apply solder paste to the coax shield BEFORE you insert it into the connector, when you heat up the connector (you'll still need adequate heat) the paste is already inside the whole connector/shield contact area. As it liquifies you'll see water-white flux running out.

Why try to stuff solder in those little holes, when you can use paste and ensure it has 100% solder coverage in between the coax cable and the connector? Other than the cost of the paste, which is less than a few botched jobs, and a good investment in reliability. Minimal heat, minimal insulator damage.
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W9KDX
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Posts: 770




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« Reply #36 on: March 24, 2012, 05:58:01 PM »

Well, problem solved.  Digging around Youtube with some of the links here, I found one where he solders the shield to the reducer before screwing it into the connector.  Then he skips the soldering through the holes.  It is a tight fit and pliers are needed to finish the assembly, but it works perfectly and makes any disassembly easier.  Not only does it work, but you can see directly if you are overheating the foam.  I used a 60 watt iron and every connector I made today was good first time.

Thanks all.
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Sam
W9KDX
N4CR
Member

Posts: 1662




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« Reply #37 on: March 24, 2012, 07:04:32 PM »

Well, problem solved.  Digging around Youtube with some of the links here, I found one where he solders the shield to the reducer before screwing it into the connector.  Then he skips the soldering through the holes.  It is a tight fit and pliers are needed to finish the assembly, but it works perfectly and makes any disassembly easier.  Not only does it work, but you can see directly if you are overheating the foam.  I used a 60 watt iron and every connector I made today was good first time.

Thanks all.

And you didn't link the video for us? Please do. I've been making shack jumpers like this for a few years now but I'd like to see the video for future reference.
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
W9KDX
Member

Posts: 770




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« Reply #38 on: March 25, 2012, 06:14:41 AM »

Well, problem solved.  Digging around Youtube with some of the links here, I found one where he solders the shield to the reducer before screwing it into the connector.  Then he skips the soldering through the holes.  It is a tight fit and pliers are needed to finish the assembly, but it works perfectly and makes any disassembly easier.  Not only does it work, but you can see directly if you are overheating the foam.  I used a 60 watt iron and every connector I made today was good first time.

Thanks all.

And you didn't link the video for us? Please do. I've been making shack jumpers like this for a few years now but I'd like to see the video for future reference.

I'll do my best.  I saw it at work last week and wasn't able to save.  I should be able to re-trace my steps and get there again.  I think it was called, "Soldering a PL-259".  There are a few, I think it was a 2 part.
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Sam
W9KDX
W9KDX
Member

Posts: 770




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« Reply #39 on: March 28, 2012, 03:00:25 PM »

Here's the link.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agkP9YMR3Kc&feature=related
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Sam
W9KDX
K4RVN
Member

Posts: 761




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« Reply #40 on: March 28, 2012, 05:57:39 PM »

I just ordered a weller 80 watt iron from Amazon.com. It was 20.95 plus 2.99 shipping. I'll be using the method in the you tube demo next time. Thanks for posting.

Frank
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W9KDX
Member

Posts: 770




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« Reply #41 on: March 29, 2012, 11:28:25 AM »

With the connectors I had, it was no where near as easy to screw the parts together.  I needed to use two sets of pliers, but no soldering through the holes was necessary, and the connection was very solid compared to anything I have done through the holes.
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Sam
W9KDX
K4RVN
Member

Posts: 761




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« Reply #42 on: March 30, 2012, 07:52:39 PM »

Sam, I would also expect to run into that with my soldering, but mine usually work OK.

Frank
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