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Author Topic: Why are some ham's ensitive about mods  (Read 7504 times)
MDNITERDER
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« on: February 20, 2012, 04:03:30 PM »



 This maybe a wrong spot or may not be but, Why are some hams so sensitive about modding radios to go out of band's such as MARS/CAP or GMRS or the 154 business bands or even CB. Is this because they are worried how the rest of the law abiding users will look when and if they get busted. Do they feel they must take the law into there own hands or is it a sense of pride on obtaining there license. 

 I know there are people out there who mod there radios for freq's they were not intended to transmit on. I think some feel when they mod there radio its like they just modified there car to go just a little faster. Granted there are those who want to just create havoc on people.

 Personally I would rather buy a radio for that band it was made for. One of my reasons would be Warranty reasons, Also I just don't want to ever bump a dial and be transmitting somewhere I just should not be, I don't wish to disrupt anything I shouldn't be.

John

 
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W0BTU
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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2012, 05:10:50 PM »

I'm not exactly sure what your point is.

But I didn't have an issue getting my older Icom to transmit on a band that I'm legally entitled to transmit on (60 meters).

And BTW, what is your callsign?
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AA4PB
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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2012, 05:47:17 PM »

Many hams are sensitive to helping someone to mod their radio to transmit illegally. If you are a licensed MARS member and want to mod your radio to transmit on MARS frequencies, that's fine. To mode an amateur transmitter to transmit on CB, GMRS or business band is not legal because the FCC requires equipment for those services to be FCC certified for use on those frequencies. It doesn't matter if you are licensed to operate on those services or not, you must use certified equipment.

Hams are not required to use FCC certified equipment to operate on amateur radio frequencies. Hams are personally responsible for ensuring that their equipment is operating correctly and not causing interference to any other service. That's one reason for the requirement to pass an exam with at least some technical theory in order to receive an amateur license.

Hams who help others to mod their equipment to operate illegally can, themselves, be subject to the loss of their ham license.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 05:49:21 PM by AA4PB » Logged
MDNITERDER
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Posts: 146




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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2012, 11:15:06 PM »

I'm not exactly sure what your point is.

But I didn't have an issue getting my older Icom to transmit on a band that I'm legally entitled to transmit on (60 meters).

And BTW, what is your callsign?

 I am working on my license, I am taking the pretest online several times a day and I remember the questions i get wrong and it has improved my score.

 my point is i have seen people ask how to mod there radios to cover GMRS freqs just go get torn a new one with out there question being answered, Yes its illegal but what one does to there radio behind the doors is there problem I guess, I dunno, just an observation.

 Me I rather pay the money get a radio made for what its intended to do.
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K8AC
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« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2012, 07:37:31 AM »

I guess there's never been anything on the test about ethics and the importance of adherence to regulations.  Personally, I feel that if a fellow amateur knowingly engages in an activity that is contrary to the rules, his character is lacking and I would not trust him to do the right thing in any dealings with him.  If he makes modifications to make a piece of gear operate on a band where that equipment would not be legal, that piece of gear will eventually be used and he becomes a party to the violation.  Of course, he will argue that since the FCC doesn't enforce the rules then they must not be serious rules. 

So, my point: if you make or intend to make such modifications, don't expect to be treated warmly by those whose assistance you seek.  In the long run, amateur radio can not benefit from simply ignoring such activity. 

73, Floyd - K8AC
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K9YLI
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« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2012, 07:51:43 AM »

 Like  K8AC says  it makes the  ham  who flaunts the  laws, seem  unethical..
No one wants to  associate with an  unethical person...
Also   amateur radio  has always been      'self policeing'''
Hence if you have an amateur license  yo become part of the   'police force'
with the weapon of         peer pressure...

Would you continue to  play  golf  or  bowl  with someone that   constantly  cheats???

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K8AXW
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« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2012, 08:37:24 AM »

I was asked by a relative to "mod" a 2m transceiver so he could be on the same frequency as his deer hunting buddies...... who had their transceivers modified. 

I refused.  Why, because it would have been illegal.  Plain and simple!  I had no idea what frequencies this would have opened up for him or what kind of interference such mods would have caused. 
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MDNITERDER
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« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2012, 01:24:58 PM »

 Good Points  Smiley
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KB1NXE
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« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2012, 11:11:25 AM »

Actually, there is nothing illegal about MODIFYING a radio to transmit out of the assigned bands based upon the radio's certifications.  If it were, no one could modify a Public Service repeater for 2 meter operations (for example).  It is illegal to TRANSMIT on those frequencies in almost all circumstances where your license or privilege does not allow, however.  There are some VERY NARROW circumstances that would allow you to transmit where ever you needed.  Saving one's (yourself or some one else) life or limb where no other means of communication exist (read: Dire Emergency) is about the only one I can think of.
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KCJ9091
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« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2012, 05:11:02 PM »

If you know the person is going to use the radio illegally and you do the mod to allow the law to be violated you could be charged with conspiracy under federal law.
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KD8HYN
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« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2012, 10:19:21 PM »

It would be nice if the FCC would lighten up on some of the rules. I'd love to use my Baofeng UV3R's on MURS, they'd be otherwise compliant other than the FCC not saying that they are, especially considering that that model will transmit on just about any frequency it can receive.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2012, 10:21:05 PM by KD8HYN » Logged

73
K9YLI
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« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2012, 07:06:15 AM »

Kb1NXE.. you are incorrect in your statement..

Any amateur  can  modify  commercial  gear  into the ham bands..   What  you  don't want to do/try is  modify  ham band equipment into the commercial  bands  where
'certification' is required.

While  you can  'reprogram' a commercial  radio  to work on its original  service  and  also  as a ham unit..
you can not  'modify'   a commercial  radio  to use on the hambands  and keep its commercial  'certification..''

Any modification, deletes the  'manufactured certification'

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AA4PB
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« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2012, 11:05:09 AM »

Certification can place limitations on commercial equipment like channelized frequency control, limited frequency coverage, non-removable antennas, and tighter technical specifications. In some cases its a matter of keeping a commercial operator who hasn't taken an FCC exam from operating off frequency or out of band. Unless your HT has been fully tested you can't assume that it would meet the requirements for FCC certification. You also can't assume that because a mfg makes a certified radio that looks just like your amateur version that your amateur version will meet the certification requirements.

If you value your amateur license, I'd recommend that you didn't get into the business of modifying amateur equipment for your friends to operate on CB, MURS, or other non-amateur service frequencies.

Remember, as a Ham you get a lot of benefits (including designing and building your own equipment) that users in other services don't get. That's why you took a test.
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MDNITERDER
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« Reply #13 on: February 24, 2012, 01:20:22 PM »

 Well as I stated its why I would rather buy the correct equipment for the job
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W5LZ
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« Reply #14 on: February 24, 2012, 06:14:59 PM »

A ham can (is allowed) to modify his equipment in any way he so chooses.  That does not mean he is able to transmit on out of band frequencies, only that modifying equipment in such a way that it's possible is legal.  Big difference there.  Doing the modification is NOT showing intent.
 - Paul
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