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Author Topic: ARRL.NET address and SPAM  (Read 2643 times)
EX_AA5JG
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Posts: 26




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« on: February 27, 2012, 11:00:47 AM »

Does using your call @ARRL.NET alias still lead to loads of spam in your mailbox?  They used to have that problem a few years ago, so I discontinued using the ARRL.NET address.  Wonder if it has been fixed?  How about having your email address posted on QRZ.COM?  Does that increase spam?

« Last Edit: March 01, 2012, 08:27:48 AM by AF5CC » Logged
KD8HYN
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Posts: 22




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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2012, 12:11:45 PM »

I have KD8HYN@arrl.net and KD8HYN@gmail.com and have these fairly publicly listed and haven't gotten any spam yet. (knock on wood)
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73
WA3SKN
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Posts: 5420




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« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2012, 12:55:52 PM »

Why not ask the ARRL site webmaster?  They would know more about their site.

-Mike.
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K6LCS
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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2012, 02:57:51 PM »

I haven't been able to attribute a single piece of spam as being sent through the ARRL the past several years.

Clint K6LCS
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Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.k6lcs.com
W4VR
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2012, 08:52:48 AM »

I use ARRL.net the majority of the time for personal use and on eham.net and have not had a problem in years.  In my case emails still have to go through the Verizon server which helps control spam.  eham was also having problems with everyone's email address available to the public, but since they have made changes in their system to allow only users of eham to read someone else's address by requiring name and password that has helped keep the spam down.
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K6LCS
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« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2012, 10:14:32 AM »

>> ... Yahoo.com ...

Yahoo has been shown to be problematic in this area ... I have very few contacts that i take seriously who use Yahoo for their email.

Clint K6LCS
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Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.k6lcs.com
KL3HY
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Posts: 117




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« Reply #6 on: February 29, 2012, 10:09:03 AM »

I thought the arrl.net addresses were simply aliases that pointed to your real email address.  For example, hamcall@arrl.net would simply point to joe.smith@example.com.  If that's correct, then it simply comes down to how much you use the arrl.net address--the more you use it, and the more you submit it to risky websites (ones that sell their customer email databases to spammers), the more spam you're going to get through it.

Unless ARRL publishes the entire list of active arrl.net addresses (which would be incredibly stupid and I can't believe they would do anything like that), then using your arrl.net address is no riskier than using the address it ultimately redirects to.
« Last Edit: February 29, 2012, 01:43:56 PM by KL3HY » Logged
W4VR
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« Reply #7 on: February 29, 2012, 11:23:04 AM »

I thought the arrl.net addresses were simply aliases that pointed to your real email address.  For example, kl3hy@arrl.net would simply point to joe.smith@example.com.  If that's correct, then it simply comes down to how much you use the arrl.net address--the more you use it, and the more you submit it to risky websites (ones that sell their customer email databases to spammers), the more spam you're going to get through it.

Unless ARRL publishes the entire list of active arrl.net addresses (which would be incredibly stupid and I can't believe they would do anything like that), then using your arrl.net address is no riskier than using the address it ultimately redirects to.

Your last sentence is absolutely correct!
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W0BTU
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« Reply #8 on: February 29, 2012, 12:33:33 PM »

I have ... and have these fairly publicly listed and haven't gotten any spam yet. (knock on wood)

Knock on wood is right!

A little friendly advice: if you had the bad experiences that I have had over the years, you would immediately take those down (and while you're at it, edit them out of your public post above).

There are spam bots that constantly scour the web for fresh email addresses to send spam to. Before I realized that --and didn't know how to hide e-mail addresses from those bots-- my first web site was picked over. Years later, those e-mail address are the source of many spam messages per day that get through the spam filters.

Among other methods, I now use Javascript, graphics, and special form handlers (tectite.com) on my sites to minimize spam.
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KB1TXK
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Posts: 438


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« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2012, 07:26:15 PM »

Does using your call @ARRL.NET alias still lead to loads of spam in your mailbox?

The way I see it, a technical argument could be made that yes...having a callsign@arrl.net address could lead to more spam.  

Since callsigns use a specific format and size, theres a VERY narrow combination of addresses (when you consider every possible email address in the world). Factor in the fact that one could also generate a list of active license holders using freely available online resources. Now you have an ultra-narrow list of email addresses that have a higher chance of being active.  Fire up the spam factory, and see if arrl.net uses good spam filtering or not. I'm thinking at one point, they didnt?

If arrl adrresses arent just relays: If they provide a webmail portal, or use a mail server that allows server-side rules, you may be able to set up a forward to send arrl.net mail to places w/ better spam filtering like Google (or any other filtering server). Give out your arrl address, but check it w/ Gmail.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2012, 07:31:07 PM by KB1TXK » Logged

K2YO
Member

Posts: 436




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« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2012, 10:02:35 AM »

In my experience, the amount of spam you get is not related to the domain that host's your email address, but to your use of the address. I have an email address that I only give to special customers. It's be in use for almost 10 years no. I get zero spam on it. My personal email address runs through the same server and has been used for 15 years. Its been used to sign up for forums, product registrations, etc. It get's a ton of spam. Looking at my Junk Email folder, there are 196 messages from yesterday that got rated as spam. So where you use your email address makes a big difference!

The second issue to consider is, what is each person's definition of loads of spam. I have a couple of customers who will jump up and down if they get two junk emails in a week. I have others who just delete them and don't care. I'd be curious to see the OP's definition of "loads" of spam and to also see where the email address was used.

Bernie
K2YO
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W0BTU
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« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2012, 10:17:31 AM »

the amount of spam you get is ... related to ... your use of the address.

You said it! There's a lot of truth in that.
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