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Author Topic: 2 meter SSB  (Read 7464 times)
N4TLL
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Posts: 6




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« on: February 28, 2012, 06:18:40 PM »

Tell me About How to Reach Ham's on 2 meter SSB?
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G8YMW
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Posts: 189




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« Reply #1 on: February 29, 2012, 03:29:04 AM »

Brief .
Aerial up high, horizontal polarity. RG213 or better coax. Dont know what you have at your end.
If you already have 6 metres, you could put 2 metres up it, it'll load (3rd harmonic near enough) and give you a taster.
Remember, on 2 polarity is crucial (20dB ish loss for being cross polarized)

Cheers de Tony
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K8GU
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« Reply #2 on: February 29, 2012, 09:44:26 AM »

G8YMW gave you some good ideas.

If you're still in SE KY, you're pretty far from large population centers.  So, it's especially vital that you get your antenna up high and run a little bit of power (maybe 100 watts or more).  Getting up on a hill with a beam of at least 6 elements during a contest will get you a lot of QSOs.  Another good time to try is Wednesday night nets.  KC9BQA (http://www.kc9bqa.com/) keeps a list of the active nets.  There is also a net called by KA1ZE/3 up in PA every morning on 144.205 MHz starting at 1200 UT.  This is a good time of day for tropo as we move into the summer months.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #3 on: February 29, 2012, 10:22:35 AM »

If you already have 6 metres, you could put 2 metres up it, it'll load...

That depends on the type of antenna so you can't make a blanket statement. If its a simple 6M dipole directly connected to the coax it'll probably load. If its something like a 6M Ringo Ranger with a matching device in the base you'll likely run into trouble trying to use it on 2M.

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G8YMW
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« Reply #4 on: February 29, 2012, 02:12:06 PM »

Posted by: AA4PB
Insert Quote
Quote from: G8YMW on Today at 03:29:04 AM
If you already have 6 metres, you could put 2 metres up it, it'll load...

That depends on the type of antenna so you can't make a blanket statement. If its a simple 6M dipole directly connected to the coax it'll probably load. If its something like a 6M Ringo Ranger with a matching device in the base you'll likely run into trouble trying to use it on 2M.


The Ringo Ranger is VERTICAL, I said HORIZONTAL.
Yes a 6 metre dipole will load as will a 5 ele Tonna I know, I've done it.
The dipole has worked very similar distances on both bands ( circa 200 km flat band)
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N4TLL
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #5 on: February 29, 2012, 09:20:34 PM »

Thanks for the information I just put up a M2Beam Antenna for 2 Meter SSB on Tuesday right now it's about 35 feet off the Ground
I do live in the mountians in southeast kentucky Jenkins near the Virginia border and Tennessee Border too. I did pick up a somekind of signal on 144 SSB Channel somewhere I was wondering which SSB Net is near me so I can check in on the net too. If Any hams want to give me a Shout on 2 meter SSB I will answer too. Tim N4TLL Jenkins Kentucky in Letcher County Kentucky
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K9KJM
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« Reply #6 on: February 29, 2012, 11:54:11 PM »

As pointed out, the antenna needs to be horizontal.   M2 makes some really good antennas.
The type of coax used depends on the overall length you need to use.   Whatever kind you use, Keep the coax feedline as short as possible.   
Rule of thumb to follow, up to 35 or so feet, Some good quality Belden RG8X will do, Longer than 35 or so feet, up to about 75 feet, Go with some TIMES LMR 400.   Longer than 75 feet, Find some good used Heliax and connectors.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2012, 11:17:50 AM »

There are many scheduled 2m SSB nets all over the place.

Closest ones to you are:

Sundays 8:00 PM 144.180 Eastern TN net
Sundays 8:30 PM 144.220 Raleigh, NC net
Wednesdays 8:30 PM 144.220 Multi-state net
Daily  8:30 PM 144.210 Nashville, TN net

If you're lucky or have a good location you might get into the Packrats Monday night VHF activity net, whose net control is in PA but they often have assists with multiple net controls to take check ins from farther away.  It's Mondays on 8:00 PM, 144.150.

Also if you're lucky or have a good location you might occasionally hear one of the midwest nets like the one on 144.230 on Wednesday nights at 8:00 PM Central Time (would be 9:00 PM your time).

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AA4PB
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« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2012, 11:50:25 AM »

The Ringo Ranger is VERTICAL, I said HORIZONTAL.

It doesn't really matter if the 6M antenna is vertical or horizontal. If it has a frequency dependent matching section then it isn't likely to load well on 2M. All I'm saying is that he needs to examine the antenna design before hooking it up to his 2M transmitter rather than making the assumption that all 6M antennas load okay on 2M.
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KI6CQ
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Posts: 8




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« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2012, 06:45:39 PM »

2m is mostly a line of sight band.  Not always, but mostly. It will knife edge over ridges somewhat.
While tropo and E-skip are possibilities, big openings are not an every day thing.

That being said, from mountaintop to mountaintop 200-300 miles and sometimes further is possible on a regular basis when there are no obstacles.

If you are stuck in a hole, you may have noone to talk to unless you try satellite or moonbounce or wait for an opening.

Cubex makes a nice 8 element quad for 2m.  This won't necessarily pull you out of a deep hole but will help bring in those distant stations if you are lucky
enough to have a site on a hill.

On 2m, I recommend the use of the smaller surplus andrew feedlines, such as FSJ1, or Andrew or Times Microwave LMR 400 or LMR 240.
Pay attention to waterproofing and consider switching to N connectors.  Most of the surplus jumpers from the cellphone industry use Ns.

73 Paul

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WV4L
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Posts: 136


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« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2012, 08:09:02 AM »

There are many scheduled 2m SSB nets all over the place.

Closest ones to you are:

Sundays 8:00 PM 144.180 Eastern TN net
Sundays 8:30 PM 144.220 Raleigh, NC net
Wednesdays 8:30 PM 144.220 Multi-state net
Daily  8:30 PM 144.210 Nashville, TN net

If you're lucky or have a good location you might get into the Packrats Monday night VHF activity net, whose net control is in PA but they often have assists with multiple net controls to take check ins from farther away.  It's Mondays on 8:00 PM, 144.150.

Also if you're lucky or have a good location you might occasionally hear one of the midwest nets like the one on 144.230 on Wednesday nights at 8:00 PM Central Time (would be 9:00 PM your time).



Thanks for the info on these nets!  I just put up a 2M beam and have been looking for some 2M USB activity. I might have to give a listen and see if I can hear some of these.

73

Wayne C.
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K3GM
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Posts: 1765




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« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2012, 09:17:56 AM »

With the recent solar upheaval, and subsequent CME's, start listening for aurora backscatter activity.  With as little as eighty watts, and a fair sized yagi, you can easily operate CW.  SSB works as well, but you need a lot more power.  Beam north, and listen for signals from the east coast to the deep midwest (from your locale).  CW is very buzzy sounding, while SSB sounds like an eerie whisper.  When HF completely shuts down, 2 meters often opens up using this mode.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 03:28:23 AM by K3GM » Logged
W4JST
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Posts: 0




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« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2012, 06:32:37 PM »

N4TLL
WV4L
etc,

I am near Richmond, VA and would be willing to have a contact with anyone in range on 2m SSB/CW.

Have your antenna as high as possible, horizontally polarized, a yagi or quad will be better than an omni loop. Power will help but height and a directional antenna will help more.

You want to make sure you don't have a noise source, power lines or something, causing a problem. Some of the signals are very weak but can be copied perfectly if noise is down, your squelch is down, etc.

Monitor 144.200 USB
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