Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: is this a small yard?  (Read 2444 times)
BARRY64
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« on: March 04, 2012, 12:31:17 AM »

I'm a new ham trying to figure out what kind of antenna to put up but the more I learn about wires, the less I understand. Getting up and out is proving to be a challenge, especially since I'm lousy at math.
 The city sits in a valley with 2000 ft mountains all around, and I'm in the NW corner of it all, right at the bottom of a hill thats due West, so I'm probably going to have to shoot for the HF bands.
 There's a 25 foot tree in the front yard that's 72 feet from the back fence.  The backyard is 78' by 25' and fenced, but the other 75% of the huge corner lot is off limits;  it's open on a busy street, so anything I put up would be ripped off by morning.
What can I put up in such a space?  

Here's a picture of the place:

Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1673




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2012, 03:16:07 AM »

      Basically same set up at my place. I homebrewed a 66 ft.new Carolina windom
(Len Carlson K4IWL web site) and put one end 20 ft. up in tree in front of house,ran it over my roof( 1 story ranch) to a 25 ft.painter pole (Home Depot) which was braced up againt my back yard property line stockade fence. One end of antenna is about 20 ft. from street utility lines,no problem.I do not use a tuner on 40/20/15 M but need to use one on 80/30 M.I have had very good results with this set up especially for qrp dx. I'm sure you will get many more workable suggestions, also you might want to get your compass adjusted HI. Good luck.      Jim
« Last Edit: March 04, 2012, 03:23:26 AM by W1JKA » Logged
N3WAK
Member

Posts: 278




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2012, 04:35:22 AM »

Barry--Sure, you could've had a taller tree in the front and a taller tree in the back, but you have more room than do many hams.  I agree with Jim--put some sort of mast back at your fence line.  I don't know how tall your house is, but you could put a mast at the center of your fence line and some sort of inverted vee parallel to the fence, with the guy lines at the ends affixed to the fence.  Maybe one for 40 meters would fit, and wouldn't be too close to any power lines...but if it would, put one up for 20 meters.  You could feed a dedicated 40 meter inverted vee with coax and use it easily on 40 and 15 meters without an external tuner, or feed a dedicated 20 meter vee with coax.  If you wanted to use the inverted vee on a bunch of bands, feed it with ladder line to a tuner at the base of the mast or to a tuner in the shack--either would work fine. 

Or, you could build an inverted L antenna, with the vertical part running up your mast and the horizontal part extended over your house to the tree.  Or, you could devise some other arrangement, with the horizontal part extending to a short mast above your chimney.  Put a tuner at the base and feed it with coax.  You then have a fine, multiband antenna.  Yes, you'll need to put some radials down in your backyard and along the sides of the front--very do-able. 

You have lots and lots of possibilities.  Building your own antenna is a lot of fun and a great learning experience.  Don't be put off by your small lot--at least you HAVE a tree, which I don't! 

For a mast at your fence line, you could build a 20' PVC mast easily for $15 with materials from Lowes or Home Depot, or a 25'+ mast made from fiberglass tubing (DX Engineering and lots of others) or metal 10' TV mast sections from Radio Shack. 

Have fun and 73, Tony
Logged
BARRY64
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2012, 05:46:04 AM »

Thanks, Tony- I was originally thinking of an L shape, but was discouraged after reading some things that said that's not a good idea because it tends to make the antenna inefficient.  But you're saying a long wire angled up to the North corner of the fence and then across the house and over to the tree?  I think that may be something to try, just to experiment.
  The radio room is pretty close to the tree, so I"ve already got coax  to it (thanks, cable company for leaving me leftovers),  just need the ladder line and bury some radials.

Thanks for the ideas!  73
Logged
WN2C
Member

Posts: 447




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2012, 10:25:53 AM »

Why not put up a tower on the opposite end of the house on the gable end or in the back yard close to the patio cover?

Your compass is an interesting compass! I hope you don't use it out hiking in the forest...Hi Hi
Good luck
73 de wn2c
Logged
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4758




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2012, 11:49:48 AM »

If you cannot put up an inverted L, maybe a groundmount vertical.
Logged
W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2012, 01:00:39 AM »

I'm a new ham trying to figure out what kind of antenna to put up but the more I learn about wires, the less I understand. Getting up and out is proving to be a challenge, especially since I'm lousy at math.
 The city sits in a valley with 2000 ft mountains all around, and I'm in the NW corner of it all, right at the bottom of a hill thats due West, so I'm probably going to have to shoot for the HF bands.
 There's a 25 foot tree in the front yard that's 72 feet from the back fence.  The backyard is 78' by 25' and fenced, but the other 75% of the huge corner lot is off limits;  it's open on a busy street, so anything I put up would be ripped off by morning.
What can I put up in such a space?  

Here's a picture of the place:



A "FOR SALE" sign  Grin  Just kidding.

At least you have a tree. I have appx the same size back yard and I have squeezed in two 40 foot towers and a pair of telescoping mast on top of the house and shop bldg appx 70 foot apart for a OCFD at 35'. I also have a 6BTV I use for low bands on 160M thru 30M. I modified the 80M trap distance from the stock 34" to 54" like the top section of the 5BTV and retuned 80/40 using a 40M resonator and a DX Eng Hot Rodz top hat. I also can swap out the 40M resonator with the original 80M resonator and another DX Eng Hot Rodz top hat setup for 160M. Limitation is while setup for 160M, I temporarily loose 80/40 until I swap the resonators back. Just added a 160M sloper on one of the 40' tower beneath a Force 12 C3S.

A friend calls my backyard 'LANGLEY WEST' and says spy satellites fly overhead to watch what I am doing. Hope not Smiley

Make yourself a plat drawing of the available area and then add antennas in as you want and see what spacings you can fit. That's how I do my layout and it works great. Helps keep the perspective straight.

Gene W5DQ
Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
WA9YSD
Member

Posts: 138




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2012, 08:28:11 AM »

Put Mast on roof with the heaviest Tri Pod you can. Anchor wire antenna in opposite corners.  Reason for The good tri pod you my later decide to put up a yagi.

Jim K9TF
Logged
KE7ZOI
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2012, 09:31:58 AM »

 Undecided or here is A thought. 5 band vertical and staple ground wires into the grass. The ground wires do not have to run streight, shape them to your existing lot shape.
 I have an old 5 band clamped to my horses fence, it's 3 feet off the ground and uses the fence wire for counterpoise. The 5band looks alot better than A bunch of wires going over the house(just ask my wife).I have made many contacts with this antenna.Some times I will switch between the vert. and horz. antennas to see what comes in better.
hope I helped.
 73 and good hunting
 dave ke7zoi/ka7qno Grin Grin Grin
Logged
KC2VDM
Member

Posts: 145




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2012, 04:53:36 PM »

Your compass is an interesting compass! I hope you don't use it out hiking in the forest...Hi Hi

Exactly what I was thinking.
Logged
K3VAT
Member

Posts: 709




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2012, 08:28:46 PM »

I'm a new ham trying to figure out what kind of antenna to put up but the more I learn about wires, the less I understand. Getting up and out is proving to be a challenge, especially since I'm lousy at math.   The city sits in a valley with 2000 ft mountains all around, and I'm in the NW corner of it all, right at the bottom of a hill thats due West, so I'm probably going to have to shoot for the HF bands.   There's a 25 foot tree in the front yard that's 72 feet from the back fence.  The backyard is 78' by 25' and fenced, but the other 75% of the huge corner lot is off limits;  it's open on a busy street, so anything I put up would be ripped off by morning.
What can I put up in such a space? 

Congrats on the becoming a new ham.

First, what are your operating goals:  are you interested in long distance communications (DX)?  how about local nets such as those on 40 or 80M?  or do you want to just make some QSOs?  Can you operate the HF bands (general class or above)?

If this is your first station, then I recommend this:  GO SIMPLE.  Construct a dipole antenna - anyone can do this.  If you want to operate HF as a general or above, then start with a 20M dipole (now 20M is open nearly worldwide for all of the day and early evening).  You need two supports about 40' apart - try and get close to 30' high.  String the dipole between these two supports or alternately, have one high support and try and inverted vee.

The important thing for new hams is to gain experience - both practical experience learning how to install an antenna and practical experience on the air.  Keep it Simple!

GL, 73, Rich, K3VAT
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!