Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Early days of repeater use  (Read 20911 times)
N9NRA
Member

Posts: 7




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2012, 08:51:45 PM »

Hey there, just was reading this, and i can kinda recall hearing some of those old repeaters, used to hear a schoolmate from my hoghschool club (from the Wisconsin School For the Visually Handicapped in Janesville, WI, i was too young to join and it died before i was old enough unfortunately) talking on one that was up in the Janesville area.  Question for ya, anyone here happen to recall if they had PL access back then, or did they use "whistle-up" access?  I can recall reading an article about it in an old issue of QST that i have here in my shack, it mentiones something about needing a "whistle" tone of a certain frequency to open the machine up.  Thoughts?  73.  N9NRA
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20611




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2012, 09:46:50 AM »

You can't "whistle up" a CTCSS ("PL") activated system, at all.

That works only for "tone burst" activated systems, which are popular in Europe but not in the U.S.  The tone burst opens the system with a single burst of a high frequency tone (like 1750 Hz), so a "whistle" can often make that work.

Our systems here are almost entirely CTCSS at much lower frequencies and the tone is required continuously.
Logged
KK9CQ
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2012, 09:34:48 PM »

I realize the post is about repeaters, but after reading these comments, I re-call the old days of "running a phone patch" on HF. Sort-a miss that too.

Bob
Logged
W0FM
Member

Posts: 2056




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2012, 11:26:35 AM »

My first exposure to repeaters was when Tom Fischel, KØPJG stopped to show me his VW beetle with a GE Progline (I think) commercial FM low-band transceiver installed in it.  He had modified it for 6 Meters and he and some friends had a 6 Meter repeater operating here in the St. Louis area.  The 6M FM rig's control head was mounted on the dashboard of Tom's beetle and above it, in a Bud box, was a DTMF pad Tom built for repeater autopatch.  I believe the early repeaters in our area were all carrier squelch (open).

I recall thinking how silly Tom's beetle looked with the 6M whip with ball and spring mount on the back bumper.  Of course, it wasn't so silly anymore after I built up an old commercial rig for 6M of my own and installed a 6M halo on the back bumper of my '57 Chevy. 

"Hello Mom?  Guess where I'm talking to you from.....";o)

Funny how your view point changes when you are viewing something at a much "closer" distance.

Terry, WØFM
Logged
WD4AOG
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2012, 07:23:09 AM »

2 meter phone patch was a huge draw for me in the mid 70's.  That is what lured me into the hobby.  I recall our club having 2 repeaters on a broadcast tower and having to have an additional receiver on the output frequency.  In those days, if someone was on your output frequency, your repeater could not come up and interfere with them thus the need for the system to monitor the output before transmitting.

I also recall one bright fellow who programmed a Commodore Pet computer to control both machines.  With TouchTone pads, you could make an autopatch or play a couple of welcome tapes from broadcast cart machines.  That was VERY cool back then. 

The same guy, Jack, KB4B, helped me start a repeater using his BASIC code modified for my one machine and his schematic for the computer-to-repeater interface.  He even threw in most of the parts and charged nothing for any of it.  I added some additional features like being able to tone up NASA Select audio so that we could listen to the space shuttle via my backyard C-band dish and I also made use of one of the "voices" in the computer to generate the CW id.  The machine consisted of 2 Icom 22-S transceivers, some VHF Engineering 220mhz gear and a couple of yagis (to link the split sites), 2 Hustler G6 antennae and a Commodore 64.  Audio mixing was accomplished with an old Radio Shack stereo audio mixer, left channel for audio to the repeater, right channel for audio to the phone line.  Some simple EQ on each input allowed me to have very nice audio unlike some other linked repeaters that sounded "tinny."  The whole machine was as ugly as a mud fence but worked beautifully.

A marine deep cycle battery on constant charge ran a voltage inverter which, in turn, powered the station and provided continuous operation when AC power failed.  Not the most efficient power chain but it never failed once in the many years the repeater was on the air.
Logged
KK9H
Member

Posts: 18




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2012, 09:52:52 AM »

I grew up in the Chicago area and while a senior in high school in early 1970, I was introduced to 2M FM by my "Elmer" WB9OUD. At that time, there were two active repeaters on tall buildings in the city. Both were quite busy most of the time and fun to listen to on a VHF-Hi tuneable receiver I had. A ham that was retiring to Florida and selling a 2-channel Motorola 41V that he had modified to operate on 146.94 simplex (the precursor to 146.52) and one of the repeaters. It was in excellent shape, offered at a price I could afford, so I bought it. It took a bit of doing, with my father's help, to get that thing installed in our car with all the cables running from the trunk to the dashboard and battery, but we did it. I had a ball with that radio. It worked great and it didn't hurt that it looked like an "official" police radio either. Later I went to college in Tennessee and bought a Regency HR2B which I loaded up with crystals so it would work repeaters located along the way on my trips to and from school. The nine hour journey went much more quickly having that rig in my car too. One thing that I remember so well was how many cities had 146.34/.94 repeaters back then. They were everywhere which was great because I only needed one set of crystals in my HR2B for use in so many different cities. PL was not in common use at that time so it was fun to see how often you could key the mike and bring up two or more repeaters at once, especially if you elevated on a mountain somewhere. Great memories from the early 1970's.
Logged
KG4NEL
Member

Posts: 373




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: May 13, 2012, 06:04:43 PM »

You can't "whistle up" a CTCSS ("PL") activated system, at all.

That works only for "tone burst" activated systems, which are popular in Europe but not in the U.S.  The tone burst opens the system with a single burst of a high frequency tone (like 1750 Hz), so a "whistle" can often make that work.

Our systems here are almost entirely CTCSS at much lower frequencies and the tone is required continuously.

Reminds me of the old stories of whistles, and then "blue boxes" being used to access tone-encoded long distance phone systems Smiley



Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!