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Author Topic: Getting wi-fi to my shack  (Read 6219 times)
KC4ZGP
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Posts: 1637




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« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2017, 08:01:51 AM »


Who needs internet when you have a bunch of hams to talk to?

Kraus
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N5BCN
Member

Posts: 28




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« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2017, 10:29:45 AM »

IMHO, a 2.4 Ghz yagi from the house pointed at a 2.4 ghz yagi attached to the bridge (router) in your shack ought to be enough gain to make the 250 foot distance in one hop, if line of site is not an issue.

73's


For a DIY project, there are several articles on the internet about making a directional WiFi antenna out of a metal can (a Pringles potato chip container seems to be popular).  High School science classes sometimes have technology challenges to see who can come up with the best WiFi antenna.  Some of the designs are pretty ingenious.

73 Brian N5BCN
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KI7PLD
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Posts: 14




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« Reply #17 on: November 03, 2017, 09:00:47 AM »

The Googles will lead you to the path of enlightenment.

Search "2.4 GHz Wi-Fi directional antennas"

Try one antenna at your access point, pointed at your shack.

If you main AP is not a dual antenna you may need another solution.

The alternative is 2 separate access points with directional antennas acting as a relay.

The best is a CAT cable to the house as anything wireless can be sniffed, hacked, or otherwise misused.
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OZ8AGB
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Posts: 348




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« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2017, 09:15:34 AM »


Who needs internet when you have a bunch of hams to talk to?

Kraus

DXCluster. Sending logs to LOTW etc. Looking up where to send QSL on qrz.com.
Download digi-mode software. BACKUP the LOGFILE.
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KW4GT
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Posts: 78




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« Reply #19 on: November 09, 2017, 08:27:40 PM »



Speaking from the perspective of a professional network engineer and a WISP engineer (wireless ISP)
I can  tell you that any sort of range extender, larger antenna, etc
is NOT going to work that well, compared to a pair of radios dedicated to the purpose.

Ubiquity Loco radios are what I'd use -- I have installed MANY pairs of these and they perform absolutely unbelieveably well.


This is an Amazon link -- if you prefer brand new with warranty, etc - but you'll pay more for the privilege.
You'd need two of these
https://www.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-Networks-0000070700985-NanoStation-loco/dp/B004EHSV4W/ref=sr_1_1




This is the way I went, after a bit of fussing around with getting them set up it worked perfectly.  I decided to try it with keeping both units indoors, which means they're shooting through a couple of walls, windows, and a screen, and the signal strength is still very good. 

Here's a youtube link I found with a quick tutorial on setting these up.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__xzHnK6IVs
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“Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.'” ― Isaac Asimov
WA2ISE
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Posts: 1057




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« Reply #20 on: November 15, 2017, 11:51:54 AM »

If you do the CAT5 cable method, be sure to use shielded cat5, else you'll get birdies every 60KHz or so on HF.  Max length of a cat5 cable run is 100 meters, which is more than 250 feet, assuming a straight path.  And get cable you can bury. 
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AA2UK
Member

Posts: 383




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« Reply #21 on: November 17, 2017, 09:07:31 AM »

Ubiquity makes a few 900MHz radio/ links they might be better suited to your needs.  Use them in bridge mode.
Bill AA2UK
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KM1H
Member

Posts: 2666




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« Reply #22 on: November 21, 2017, 03:36:51 PM »

For about 14 years I used a 2.4 gHz and later 5.6gHz link (eventually too much QRM on unlicensed 2.4) over a 12 mile path for my internet. No yagis, just small patch arrays. I got free service since my hilltop tower was used to link their customers on the other side of this 650' hill.
Then they folded and I was forced to Comcrap.

Carl
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