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Author Topic: Wheres Waldo?  (Read 1541 times)
KF7DS
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Posts: 190




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« on: March 14, 2012, 01:46:46 PM »

All:

I have been back into Ham Radio since last June, relearning CW from my Novice days 45 years ago, and building a new station.

My CW is getting better and I can transcribe about 70% of the W1AW broadcasts at 18WPM, and close to 100% at 15 WPM, so things are going well there.

I have tried to work into a CW pileup several times but have not been able to find Waldo, i.e. the DX station. It is pretty easy to hear the top and low edges of the pileup (and see them in my IC 7600 bandscope), and I typically start searching for the DX from what I perceive as the bottom, and then work backwards, slowly, from that point until I am around 10KHz downstream. If I have not found the DX there, I try again.

So far, I have only once found the DX. He was faint and a lid was transmitting on top of his frequency when he told the person to move "UP".

Honestly, CW pileups really do not look like too much fun, sitting there continually sending one's callsign, but I am sure once you get through one of those, it is a thrill....seems like a lot of work for one call.

It is funny too that most of the CW DX I have encountered has been very random, just scanning through a band and patiently listening...and, usually, I will hear one calling CQ and then I will snag it...that is a lot of fun.

But, I would like to take a try at cracking a CW pileup now and then and would appreciate any tips anyone can offer.

Thanks,
Don KF7QZB
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N3QE
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Posts: 2196




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« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2012, 01:55:47 PM »

You know, when inconsiderate folks put a fake spot up on the cluster, I've heard pileups form when there never was any actual DX!

But more likely:

Due to the nature of propagation, just because station X can hear station Y, and station Y can hear station Z, does not mean that station Z can hear station X.  In fact this happens a lot on HF; I can be working Europe in the morning on 10M or 15M and not hear a single NA station, yet the European stations are clearly hearing other NA stations. This is less likely to happen on 80M but is often the case on 40M when it is "long".
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VA7CPC
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Posts: 2386




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« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2012, 06:02:32 PM »

A friend of mine, with over 200 DX entities in the log, says he only did it by using one of the "DX clusters" to find the DX station.

That way, he _doesn't_ have to tune through the bands.

There's a "DX Cluster Spots" link, on the eHam.net main page, left column.  That should get you started.

           Charles

PS -- I usually work DX only during contests.  So I sympathize with the "pileup problem".  If I can't get through after a few minutes, I give up and work the next station up or down.
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KC9TNH
Member

Posts: 304




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« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2012, 12:05:46 PM »

But, I would like to take a try at cracking a CW pileup now and then and would appreciate any tips anyone can offer.

Thanks,
Don KF7QZB
One tip given to me awhile back by someone across alot of water & a long way's away was how much they actually appreciate the calling station truly being zero-beat. I had engaged them later via email, expressing appreciation for picking me up, and they remembered me because my (I thought puny) signal was "right there." Probably small change as a tip with all the experienced DX folks around, but it has occasionally worked for me (at least I guess so).

Have fun!
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73
Wes -KC9TNH
"Don't get treed by a chihuahua." - Pete
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