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Author Topic: Neutrino telegraphy  (Read 1143 times)
N3QE
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Posts: 2032




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« on: March 16, 2012, 03:35:16 AM »

All of us are proud of how telegraphy can communicate effectively through extremely difficult situations where other methods fail. These guys used a neutrino beam and on/off keying to send a simple multicharacter message through 0.6 miles of solid rock. What's even more impressive, is that if it was 5000 miles or 5000000 miles of solid rock, almost none of the neutrinos would have been stopped or interfered with:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46748654/ns/technology_and_science-science/#.T2MVz19K07w

http://arxiv.org/pdf/1203.2847.pdf

Beams of neutrinos have been proposed as a vehicle for communications under unusual
circumstances, such as direct point-to-point global communication, communication with
submarines, secure communications and interstellar communication. We report on the
performance of a low-rate communications link established using the NuMI beam line
and the MINERvA detector at Fermilab. The link achieved a decoded data rate of 0.1
bits/sec with a bit error rate of 1% over a distance of 1.035 km, including 240 m of earth.

The simplest method for encoding information about the neutrino beam is on-off
keying (OOK). In this scheme, a “1” or a “0” is represented by the presence or absence of a beam pulse, respectively. In the NuMI beam line, OOK was implemented
by controlling proton beam pulses from the Main Injector. [...] A “1” bit corresponds to a beam pulse with
an observed event or events, and a “0” bit is a pulse with no events.


Unfortunately these guys used truncated ASCII instead of Morse, but they'll learn.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 03:39:16 AM by N3QE » Logged
LB5KE
Member

Posts: 141




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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2012, 05:53:57 AM »

I also like the "Time traveling messages" part. Then i could communicate with my late grandfather, and tell him that i got my ham licence.
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PA0BLAH
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Posts: 0




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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2012, 11:13:34 AM »

I also like the "Time traveling messages" part. Then i could communicate with my late grandfather, and tell him that i got my ham licence.
And your late grandfather answering:"Hadn't you got used your time any better?" "Ridiculous to use an unreliable insecure smallbandwidth noisy communication channel  with foreign build equipment in the presence of reliable secure wideband  Internet facilities."
« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 11:15:27 AM by PA0BLAH » Logged
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