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Author Topic: Equipment Listed on 1940 QSL Card  (Read 3749 times)
N0GRM
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« on: March 16, 2012, 02:07:53 PM »

I happened upon an old QSL card from my mother-in–law’s father, sent January 31, 1940.  I purchased the card on-line and will be presenting it to her for her 75th birthday in April.  It is my understanding that he built all his own gear, since it was during the war.  He (Jack Farr – W1LUD) was an electrical engineer for General Electric –it would have been interesting to learn what he was working on… 

On the card he listed his transmitter as “59X-807-P.P.809” (may be followed by a five or a comma)  and the receiver as “5s 25”. 
Does anyone have an idea as to what these numbers represent – Tube type, etc?  Note he stated he was putting out 100 watts.

His QSO was with Norm – W1MVD on 160 meters.

73 – Peter N0GRM
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N4NYY
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2012, 03:09:08 PM »

I have no idea, but that is a freakin great story.
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K0WA
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2012, 06:59:32 PM »

I happened upon an old QSL card from my mother-in–law’s father, sent January 31, 1940.  I purchased the card on-line and will be presenting it to her for her 75th birthday in April.  It is my understanding that he built all his own gear, since it was during the war.  He (Jack Farr – W1LUD) was an electrical engineer for General Electric –it would have been interesting to learn what he was working on… 

On the card he listed his transmitter as “59X-807-P.P.809” (may be followed by a five or a comma)  and the receiver as “5s 25”. 
Does anyone have an idea as to what these numbers represent – Tube type, etc?  Note he stated he was putting out 100 watts.

His QSO was with Norm – W1MVD on 160 meters.

73 – Peter N0GRM


807 is a tube type....very popular during that time.  PP could be Push-Pull Amplifier using two 809 tubes.  See this site for that tube:  https://www.tubeworld.com/808.htm   Yes, two of those tubes could do 100 watts on 160

THe 59X could be an exciter....which I am not familiar with

Lee

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KB4QAA
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2012, 07:35:26 PM »

Crystal Oscillator with type 59 tube (pentode), 807 buffer, push pull (dual) 809 finals.

Crystal Oscillator was often abbreviated XO.   Hence X is short for crystal.  We are still familiar with this abbreviation if you ever give someone a "9x" RST report for "perfect tone as if crystal controlled".

The receiver numbers aren't obvious to me just yet.
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W8AAZ
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2012, 07:45:20 PM »

I believe, in homebrew transmitters, they listed the tube stages and the other guy kinda knew what it was.  In my Jones 1937 Radio Handbook, it mentions that a 59 could be used as a xtal oscillator in a transmitter, while something like a 6L6 was more popular, then.  So 59X might mean it was a 59 xtal controlled osc?   Then the 807 driving the push pull pair of 809 tubes, 1949 ARRL handbook says that with 1000 Volts, you can get 75 watts out of an 809 in CW.  So I don't know if a push pull would give you 150 then, or not?  As for the receiver, that seems kinda cryptic to me.  Hmm. Previous poster posted while I was still typing, but he has the same idea.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 07:47:26 PM by W8AAZ » Logged
N0GRM
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« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2012, 12:51:03 PM »

Fantastic - thanks so much for your input.

73 - Peter N0GRM
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KB4QAA
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« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2012, 01:18:15 PM »

www.radiomuseum.org

has a nice quick reference for many tubes.  It is German but very good in English.  For detailed information it is best to refer to guides like the RCA Receiving Tube or Transmitting Tube manuals.

www.amfone.net
has a large technical library and links to other sites.
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K1ZJH
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« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2012, 01:53:17 PM »

I can't add a thing except to agree with the others regarding the tube types and rig configuration.
That was very commonly seen on QSL cards in those days. You can bet it was a homebrewed
radio that the guy took a lot of pride in building and operating.

Pete
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W4XK
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« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2012, 07:35:11 PM »

Peter,

Look again at that 5s 25 receiver. Could it possibly say Sx 25? A 1940 vintage
Hallicrafters receiver.

Bill W4XK
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W9GB
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« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2012, 07:47:25 PM »

At first, I thought the 5s 25 receiver may have meant: 5 stage "25" receiver.

Then, I pulled down the literature for 1940 and
there was a 1.5 to 3.0 MHz receiver:   R-25/ARC-5

The Hallicrafters SX-25 was the Super Defiant (1940-1945)
« Last Edit: April 09, 2012, 07:52:08 PM by W9GB » Logged
KE3WD
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« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2012, 12:25:44 PM »

Quote
During World War II, as it had done during the first World War, the United States Congress suspended all amateur radio operations.  With most of the American amateur radio operators in the armed forces at this time, the US government created the War emergency radio service which would remain active through 1945. 

The War Emergency Radio Service (WERS) was a precursor to the civil defense and Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service systems in the United States.

At the start of the Second World War the United States Congress had suspended all amateur radio activity throughout the country.[1] WERS was established by the Federal Communications Commission in June 1942 at the insistence of the American Radio Relay League.[2] WERS would remain in operation in through the end of the Second World War in 1945.[3]

WERS was to provide communications in connection with air raid protection, and communications during times of natural disaster.[2] WERS licenses were given to communities and not individuals. One of the requirements for individuals to participate in the WERS was to hold an Amateur radio license.

Frequency Bands

2½ Meters - 112-116 MHz
1¼ Meters - 219-225 MHz

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KG6YV
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« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2012, 03:45:52 PM »

His transmitter used an 807 driving a pair of 809's in Push-Pull.
I believe that if an 809 puts out 75W then a pair in push-pull would do 150 watts.

Greg
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WA9FZB
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« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2012, 11:42:59 AM »

The two 809's would be good for up to about 150 watts INPUT.  Don't forget, that's how we used to rate transmitters in pre-solid state days.  The two tubes would likely have an output of somewhere near 100 watts.
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