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Author Topic: Why doesn't someone make a 6m/2m/70cm Radio no HF  (Read 8535 times)
MDNITERDER
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« on: April 06, 2012, 03:48:14 PM »

 Think of this a nice base or base/mobile unit with 50mhz 144mhz and 440mhz, Since tech license is the first step once obtaining your ham license.

 Btw yes I know 6m is HF I'm talking below 6m when I say no HF
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W5FYI
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« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2012, 04:13:23 PM »

Actually, six meters is considered to be VHF since it is above the HF cutoff of 30 MHz.
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KI4SDY
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« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2012, 05:03:29 PM »

For tech licensees, why don't they make a 10 meter, 6 meter, VHF, UHF, AM, SSB, FM rig that is small enough for mobile work, but with 50 watts of power (modes and power as allowed on each band). I think they would sell a lot of them.  Wink
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WX7G
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« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2012, 05:54:00 PM »

They do. It's the Yaesu FT-857. Consider the 160-12 meter bands a freebie.
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MDNITERDER
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« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2012, 06:29:13 PM »

They do. It's the Yaesu FT-857. Consider the 160-12 meter bands a freebie.

Sorry my mistake earlier, Yes 6m/50mhz is VHF

 But on the 857 its not really free, I bet if they excluded the 160-12 meter you could get a better rig for vhf and up. Yeah maybe 10 meter would be nice as well but.. I'm talking for the guys who only have a tech license. anything down on HF is almost useless unless you do CW

 If you look at units that are 160-12m they are packed full of features but as you add more frequency coverage they have to trade off somewhere to keep the bill down.

 Also as stated by KI4SDY 50watts on all bands even UHF would be nice not these 20 watt units.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2012, 06:30:54 PM by MDNITERDER » Logged
W9GB
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« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2012, 08:08:10 PM »

John --

Such a radio was made (and all-mode) by a number of mfg in 1980s and early 1990s.
 Why did it fail or not have large sales??
They actually sold ... But not at levels (hundreds of thousands) of the HF transceivers
Heathkit HW-101 or Kenwood TS-440S .. Which sold almost 1/2 million each.
The Yaesu FT-101 is probably also in that category as well. (even though many sales went to CB operators).

The Yaesu FT -726 and FT-736 were not cheap .... Today, we just do not have experimenters ... from UHF to Microwaves and beyond in USA.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2012, 08:15:07 PM by W9GB » Logged
KCJ9091
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« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2012, 08:10:01 PM »

FT-8900
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K9KJM
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« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2012, 09:04:52 PM »

A quick glance shows the Yaesu FT 8900 as a nice quad band radio with 10, 6, 2, meters plus 440, In real life, The 8900 is a memory channel disaster to program and use as compared to the Great Yaesu dual band FT8800.    The 8900 has FM only, (Which means tech class cannot use it on 10 meters, And the real "Action" on 10 and 6 meters is SSB  (And CW) Anyhow.

In the end, The purchase of a full feature "DC to daylight" all mode rig is the way to go.   The very best "Do it all" radio remains the Kenwood TS 2000,   And there are lots of the small menu driven mobil rigs at even less money. Icom IC 706 series, Yaesu 857, etc etc etc.

Never say never about upgrading and using HF.......
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N3OX
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« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2012, 09:27:37 PM »

But on the 857 its not really free, I bet if they excluded the 160-12 meter you could get a better rig for vhf and up.

You really couldn't.  You simply don't pay for a modern rig on a per-band basis because so much of the circuitry is broadband and usable on all bands, and the VHF/UHF side above 6m is probably the thing that needs the most extra special-purpose circuitry.

Deleting 160m thru 12m from a FT-857D would probably save ten very inexpensive relays and a few small coils and maybe a couple other parts.  It would not do a thing to ease the requirements for layout, frequency stability, extra final transistors, and so forth that you need to do a Tech-class type rig that just did 10m, 6m, 2m, and 70cm.

I think WX7G's comment is actually pretty accurate.  The HF bands are practically free just because of the way the rig is designed.  There are only a tiny minority of the parts  that are specific to 160m through 12m, and the harder RF engineering is probably mostly at the higher frequencies.
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73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
K7KBN
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« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2012, 11:14:39 PM »

anything down on HF is almost useless unless you do CW

So, logically ....
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
MDNITERDER
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« Reply #10 on: April 07, 2012, 04:00:55 AM »

I mean that for someone that is just starting out.. sorry.
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KCJ9091
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« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2012, 06:12:03 AM »

A quick glance shows the Yaesu FT 8900 as a nice quad band radio with 10, 6, 2, meters plus 440, In real life, The 8900 is a memory channel disaster to program and use as compared to the Great Yaesu dual band FT8800.    The 8900 has FM only, (Which means tech class cannot use it on 10 meters, And the real "Action" on 10 and 6 meters is SSB  (And CW) Anyhow.

Never listened to a Scot and a Belgian carrying on a conversation through a repeater in upstate New York?
Yes the 10 meter fm part is not usable for techs.

The 8800 and 8900 are the same radio with the same memory management system.  The 8900 memory system is a little more complicated by the addition of the two bands.  The programming software eases the discomfort a good bit.

I don't recall the OP specifying all mode.  Very few beginning operators in these parts start with SSB/CW vhf/uhf.

6 meter repeaters are plentiful if under utilized around here.  Plenty of excitement to be found by listening to 52.525 when the band opens. 
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KE3WD
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« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2012, 08:19:36 AM »

They were once in the catalogs, they are not there now for the most part because nobody bought 'em in significant numbers. 

When they *WERE* available, the common knowledge and advice was to purchase a rig that included the HF bands anyway, as being more bang per buck and "future-proof" in the case of upgrading the license. 

Those rigs were also making a lot more commercial sense back when the Code Test was a part of the upgrade, there were quite a few Technicians that remained Techs for life due to various reasons given for not being able to pass the faster CW requirements. 

Bottom line is the bottom line, hams can wish for equipments all they like, it will have not much impact on mfrs -- unless and until the hams can also prove that the cost of development, design and mfr can be recouped, along with some modicum of profit, through sales of same. 

Meanwhile, the addition of HF coverage does not add all that much in the way of cost anymore, considering how its done and mass production and all. 

73
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MDNITERDER
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« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2012, 10:26:23 AM »

 btw yes all mode, I ask cause as you start going up in price they drop 2m and 70cm rigs that cost up to 10k and im thinking well if there packed with all the best features why drop it. just trying to figure it out.
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AG6WT
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« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2012, 01:30:56 PM »

As others have said, it is not cost effective to make an all mode rig that does 10 meters and up. You might be able to make it a little cheaper if you could sell such a radio in volume but there just isn't the demand.

And if you are thinking of a radio oriented to technicians, their privileges include CW on 80, 40*, 15, and 10 meters so a "technicians" radio should include HF capability.

* I should point out that upper half of the CW portion of 40 meters is for slow code, a chunk of the spectrum for CW novices and elmers that wish to help them out.
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