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Author Topic: Morse Code NOT Commercially Dead  (Read 564 times)
N5GLR
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« on: July 26, 2006, 01:22:31 PM »

You may be happy to hear that Morse Code is alive and well in the commercial arena, although not necessarily the RF arena.  I recently discovered that the company that manufactures the Control Chief D2500 remote overhead crane controller uses Morse Code characters to report errors in the system.  They don't use the entire alphabet but, most of it is there.  I was pleasantly surprised when one of our maintenance folks pointed it out to me.  
So, next time someone tells you that "code" is obsolete and dead, ask them ... "if so, why is it still in commercial us?".   Smiley

Garry
N5GLR
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VK2PTR
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« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2006, 06:07:37 PM »

I knew there was hope for the 'fun' mode. Also, I believe it is still taught in certain military areas- can anyone confirm this?
Long Live CW,

Pete
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N3OX
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« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2006, 08:44:32 PM »

I'm sure special ops and intelligence sorts are still getting the morse training.

Dan
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73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
AA8LL
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Posts: 400




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« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2006, 11:59:41 AM »

Morse code is still used by pilots to identify navigational beacons.  My check pilot said I "must be a ham" because I could decode them so quickly.  I fly for fun but some of those airline guys get paid.
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W5ESE
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« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2006, 12:43:03 PM »

> Also, I believe it is still taught in certain
> military areas- can anyone confirm this?

Yep; in the US Marines Corps.

Amazing what you can find in Google Smiley

Occupational Specialty: 2621-2691
TITLE(s): COMMUNICATIONS SIGNAL COLLECTION/MANUAL
MORSE CODE OPERATOR/ANALYST

Current as of: 1 Apr 2005

See

http://72.14.209.104/search?q=cache:8_0TpHBOgoYJ:www.tecom.usmc.mil/g3/MOSRoadmaps/2621-2691.doc+morse+code+corry+station&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=1

73
Scott
W5ESE
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N8XD
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« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2006, 01:52:18 PM »


A group of us were letting kids try out morse code at a public event a few weeks ago.  We made up some "mouse" morse code keys and were using them with buzzers.  We also were passing out paper morse code charts to the kids.  At one point, a handful of U.S. Marines came over to the table and wanted to learn the code too.
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AB2MH
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« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2006, 05:37:31 AM »

I believe there was an eHam article showing all of the places where morse was used for error codes etc. in various pieces of equipment.

Even though I know the code, what I though was just four beeps in my car when the door was open (a Honda) actually was "H" in morse. I did not realize that.  That is so cool!
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VA7CPC
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« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2006, 03:25:26 PM »

And there's the ubiquitous:

    dididit dahdah dididit

when a cellphone gets a message from the SMS system.
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AB2MH
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« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2006, 12:27:43 PM »

Some non-ham repeaters around here use CW to ID as well.  NYC transit, for example, is one of them.  There's also a GMRS repeater around here that IDs in CW.
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KZ1X
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« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2006, 09:29:33 PM »

There are PLENTY of merchant marine vessels using Morse.  Just because the US coast stations are no longer operating for profit does not mean the Russians, Chinese, Cubans, and many others don't still use Morse on a routine commercial basis.  Tune around on the maritime bands and what do you hear?

We here in the US have a bad tendency to see the rest of the world as an extension of our own selves.  It just ain't so.
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K7AAT
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Posts: 413




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« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2006, 10:41:02 AM »


>>Also, I believe it is still taught in certain
>> military areas- can anyone confirm this?

>Yep; in the US Marines Corps

  Actually,  the Army, Navy, and AirForce too all still train intercept operators for Morse Code.  There's plenty of CW activity in foreign countries that we still monitor.


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M0RNA
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« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2006, 10:28:34 AM »

I recently watched a documentary on the French Foreign Legion which showed legionaires undergoing jungle survival training part of which was using CW to communicate with their command station.

Long live CW.

Steve
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WB0UQD
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Posts: 44




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« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2006, 05:42:59 AM »

Using only a single frequency and no modulation, CW is STILL the most effecient use of a band. You could put more CW stations on a band than EVERY OTHER FORM OF COMMUNICATION AVAILABLE TODAY! This may not matter on vhf or uhf where you have larger bands, but for the smaller HF bands it is great! Because of this, I would think CW is the preferred form of communication, although others do not share my opinion. Thanks for your time, and please correct me if I am off-base. Thanks!!!
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