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Author Topic: Mystery Boatanchor Receiver--Help, anyone?  (Read 2287 times)
K4MFN
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Posts: 17




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« on: April 08, 2012, 01:39:16 PM »

I have a WWII vint. receiver that reminds me of BC 312, 342 and 348 but I can not ID it. Someone took mainframe and put into a 19" r. rack and moved some things around. The tube lineup has me stumped; to wit--(4) 12sg7, (2) 12sj7, (1) 12sk7, (2) 6h6 and a 12a6 af output.
Four band--covers 2.0 to 20.00 mhz. The escutcheon around dial is like a 348 etc.
Any help would be appreciated.

Harold
k4mfn
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W9GB
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Posts: 2659




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« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2012, 04:45:31 PM »

Boeing B-29 Commuications Flight Deck
http://aafradio.org/flightdeck/b29.htm

The BC-224-A, -B, -C, and -D; and the BC-348-B, and -C, tuned 1.5-18 MHz in six bands.

The Signal Corps had the receiver design modified to add a 200-500 kHz band and compress the 1.5-18 MHz coverage into the remaining five bands.
This modified design became the BC-224-E and the BC-348-E.
The 200–500 kHz and 1.5-18 MHz tuning range remained constant for subsequent production of all models.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BC-348

BC348 receiver page -- James A. Moorer
http://www.nonstopsystems.com/radio/bc224-bc348-page.pdf

BC-348 receivers were copied and manufactured by the U.S.S.R. following War II by the Russian Vefon Works and labeled УС-9 (US-9 in English, US as Universal Superheterodyne, not United States.)
The УС-9 continued to be produced in the Soviet Union through the 1970s, with such improvements as a solid state inverter to replace the dynamotor.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2012, 04:54:00 PM by W9GB » Logged
K4MFN
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Posts: 17




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« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2012, 04:59:13 PM »

None in the flight deck pix was the same. Pix might help but I do not think I can learn to post them--old man; new technology.

Harold
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KM1H
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Posts: 73




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« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2012, 12:32:15 PM »

If you type WW2 radios, WW2 military radios, etc into Google you will get many hits to explore.

The 12SG7 (VT-209) was not a common WW2 tube so there may have been some swaps.

Any photos?

Carl
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AB5S
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Posts: 11




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« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2012, 03:10:29 PM »

Very likely the HF half of WWII Navy RBM.
http://www.hnsa.org/doc/ecat/cat-0946.htm
http://www.navy-radio.com/rcvrs/rbm.htm
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KM1H
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Posts: 73




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« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2012, 03:45:04 PM »

A good possibility with swapped in series 6H6 filaments.

Carl
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K4MFN
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Posts: 17




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« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2012, 06:28:01 PM »

Thanks all. It turned out to be the Navy RBM HF model. The tube lineup and pix are correct. Someone put it all on a 19" relay R. panel and moved a few knobs around.

Harold
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N5KAT
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Posts: 42




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« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2012, 07:39:35 PM »

Quote
Very likely the HF half of WWII Navy RBM.

Good sight-unseen job on the ID!
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