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Author Topic: Where is the Ground on the Yaesu FT-857D?  (Read 8218 times)
WALTERB
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Posts: 528




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« on: April 09, 2012, 07:39:44 AM »

I thought all HF radios had a chassis ground screw on the back?  For safety and reception purposes how do you ground the 857 if you are using it in a ham shack and not mobile?
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AA4PB
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2012, 08:00:03 AM »

For lightning protection the antenna coax should be grounded just before it enters the house. The radio itself doesn't need an Earth ground (in spite of what some mfgs manuals tell you). The power supply will usually be grounded to the house electrical system via the grounding pin on its power cord.
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WALTERB
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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2012, 08:05:21 AM »

For lightning protection the antenna coax should be grounded just before it enters the house. The radio itself doesn't need an Earth ground (in spite of what some mfgs manuals tell you). The power supply will usually be grounded to the house electrical system via the grounding pin on its power cord.


Hi,

it is and would never be hooked up during a storm.  I use it as part of a go-kit and for work on the back porch when the weather is nice. the coax is grounded to a netural/whole house buss system. 

I just found it odd that there was no chassic ground scew.
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M6GOM
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« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2012, 08:59:03 AM »

I thought all HF radios had a chassis ground screw on the back?  For safety and reception purposes how do you ground the 857 if you are using it in a ham shack and not mobile?


I've never grounded a single radio I've ever had. The ground screw is there for morons who don't know how to properly construct an antenna system. If you connect the ground screw and it makes a difference both to RF and safety grounding, you've got problems long before you get to the radio.
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WALTERB
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« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2012, 10:07:46 AM »

I thought all HF radios had a chassis ground screw on the back?  For safety and reception purposes how do you ground the 857 if you are using it in a ham shack and not mobile?


I've never grounded a single radio I've ever had. The ground screw is there for morons who don't know how to properly construct an antenna system. If you connect the ground screw and it makes a difference both to RF and safety grounding, you've got problems long before you get to the radio.

I'm not above calling myself a moron.  Grin

I didn't get a static shock twice this weekend when touching it. Nothing to whine about, but It did make me think it should be grounded somehow.


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W9MMS
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« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2012, 11:17:47 AM »

The Radio is grounded via the coaxial shield.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2012, 11:53:56 AM »

If you are on carpet it would not be unusual to get a static shock when touching something grounded. Your radio is already grounded via the coax shield. The static build up is on on you because of the carpet and you are discharging to the grounded radio.

Now if you are getting an electrical shock while standing on concrete or something grounded when touching the radio then there is something wrong with the grounding system.  The reason the NEC requires the antenna grounds to be bonded to the home electrical system ground is to ensure that all grounds are at the same potential. Withoug bonding they may not be and you can get a shock when touchinig two different grounds.

If you are operating portable and want a direct radio ground for some reason, just put a lug under one of the case screws or clamp a ground wire to the shell of the coax connector. There is nothing special about the ground lug on some radios.
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WD5GWY
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« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2012, 07:20:36 PM »

The radio may not be grounded thru the coax shield. With a dipole antenna both halves of the antenna are above ground unless you ground the shield somewhere else along the line.
(feed thru panel or on a tuner)
 Lots of radios have ground screws. Proper wiring of the electrical system with a good ground and a ground buss in the shack connected to external ground rod(s) is not considered being a moron. Depending on a single source for grounding(lightening protection and static drain) can eventually cost money. You might get away with it for years. But, one day it will bite you where it hurts.
  Since this is a mobile forum, grounding the radio to the frame of the car is a good idea too. (along with proper bonding etc. on the rest of the vehicle)
Just some thoughts.
james
WD5GWY

( I know that lightening can take out ANYTHING grounded or not, if it's in the area of a strike)
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N6AJR
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« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2012, 01:54:16 PM »

I have  2 of the FT 857 d's, one in the car and one in the truck.  I ground all radios in any install, shack or mobile.  On the FT 857d you can get a ground from any case screw, In the mobile I get it from one of the  mobile bracket mounting screws.  I always ground the Neg side of the battery to the chassis ( a self tapping sheet metal screw " stsms "  to the fender) the ground side of the radio to the floor next to the  radios with a  " stsms "  and from the shield side of the trunk lip mount side of the antenna to the body side of the trunk mount bolt.  It may not be necessary, but I always do it, unless using a mount drilled through the body  which has its own  natural ground.
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G7MRV
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« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2012, 09:27:24 AM »

In simple answer to the original question - the mobile mounting bracket screws go into the chassis. This is how Yaesu expect you to establish ground (other than via coax shield and power lead). In a fixed setting, I assume your using the built in stand. Therefor you can attach the ground via a ring or fork 'lucas'/crimp terminal and one of the mobile mounting bolts.
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KCJ9091
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« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2012, 03:01:18 PM »

G7MRV,
Can you still buy Lucas wiring loom replacement smoke in a jar? 

OP, if the ground braid I'm using is to big to  fit in a crimp on connector I have used a stainless steel hose clamp to clamp the ground strap to the HF antenna connector outer conductor.
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KC1CJN
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Posts: 66




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« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2014, 03:49:24 PM »

Those black screws they provide to connect the FT-857D to the mount plate are not "bare metal", so the grounding from the mount plate to the radio is not excellent - that is, not zero Ohms, as measured. I buffed off the screws with a wire brush before I screwed them in, and buffed off the mount and wire grounded to car chassis. If I get RFI, it's not the FT-857D ground. Little do I know - so correct me when wrong.
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KC2UGV
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Posts: 441




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« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2014, 09:52:32 AM »

Those black screws they provide to connect the FT-857D to the mount plate are not "bare metal", so the grounding from the mount plate to the radio is not excellent - that is, not zero Ohms, as measured. I buffed off the screws with a wire brush before I screwed them in, and buffed off the mount and wire grounded to car chassis. If I get RFI, it's not the FT-857D ground. Little do I know - so correct me when wrong.

RFI has little to do with grounding/not grounding.

If your transmissions are interfering with the car's operation, the car needs better RFI protection.  If you car is intereferring with your reception, your car needs better RFI output filtering (Or, you rig does).
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