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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: Building Code Speed  (Read 2158 times)
N8UZE
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Posts: 1524




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« Reply #15 on: August 24, 2006, 12:42:17 PM »

The ability to manually put the letters on paper tops out at right around 25wpm for most people.  At that point, if they need to make verbatim copy, they generally have to switch to typing.  There was a reason that the military operators copied on a "mill"!

However, it helps to develop the manual technique itself.  Try to make each letter a continuous stroke.  Learn to form the letters such that you don't have to lift the pen/pencil at all.  Thus block printing is a no-no if you're going for speed.  Personally I like to use sort of a script type letter.  There's a chart somewhere on the internet for single, continuous stroke letters that works well too.  You may have to practice this separately from the code itself at first.

Head copy should be the goal for conversational activities.  But for message handling you need a method of accurately writing it or typing it when the speed is over 20wpm.
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VE3XDB
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Posts: 144




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« Reply #16 on: September 19, 2006, 12:18:55 PM »

Just do it and get on the air, as mentioned by others, is a good strategy.

Here is my particular twist.  After about 10 years on CW, I was quite comfortable at 20 wpm, but less comfortable above that.  So, in a deliberate attempt to increase my speed, I started setting my keyer at between 25-30 wpm, depending on how I was feeling that day, and either called CQ, or looked for someone who sounded good, and was operating at about that speed.  Then, at the end of their QSO, I tail-ended the person, introduced myself, indicated that I was working on my code speed, and had a nice QSO.  

Try it, you'll be surprised how helpful people can be.  And if you miss a word or two, don't sweat it!  If it  is something important, just ask - like their name - "Ed" at 30 wpm sounded like "L" for the longest time!  By the way, I stopped writing down anything except information that will go in my log book, plus "keywords" that will remind me of what the other person said, as well as what I want to say on the next over.

Within a very short period of time, you will be quite comfortable at whatever speed you choose.  

Have fun!

Best regards,

Doug Behl VE3XDB
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