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Author Topic: Receiver: Switching or Linear Power Supplies ?  (Read 9554 times)
WA4053SWL
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« on: April 12, 2012, 09:21:03 AM »

Hello all,
I buy a receiver Alinco DX-R8T, this works with a power supply 13.8v and 2 or 3 amp.
What is the difference between a "Switching" and "Linear Power"??, what is the best??
Thanks for your help.
73 George
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AA4PB
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« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2012, 09:55:47 AM »

Switchiing supplies are smaller and lighter than linear supplies BUT they can generate noise that can be picked up by your receiver, especially if the antenna is close by. Switching supplies are also more complex and thus more difficult to repair than linear supplies.

For 2-3A, I'd definatly go with a good linear supply (an Astron for example). Get a supply rated for around 5A and it won't be too big or heavy anyway.
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WA4053SWL
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« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2012, 04:36:20 PM »

Ok, thanks for replying, I will get a linear power supply.
Have a nice day.
73
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N4NYY
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« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2012, 06:13:39 PM »

Here is what I do. I believe in linear. I have seen too many switchers fail. For the shack, I use linear. However, for Field Day and other portable operation, I would rather do the switchers.
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K9PU
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« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2012, 12:57:10 AM »

You might want to ask the company that you are purchasing the radio from for a recommendation.  Some of the modern radios require limited voltage range supplies (e.g. +12 VDC+/- 5%), also know as regulated.  Some have that regulated internally.  Some are designed around an automobile electric system (battery.)  I have had linear supplies fail from use with some radios due to internal surge protecting devices (MOV or transorbs.)  You can also have the radio fail from using the supply voltage that extend beyond the suggested voltage range. 

Bottom line, get the radios supply spec or a recommendation from the radio manufacture and stick to it. 

Good hunting,

Scott.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2012, 05:37:08 AM »

The Alinco DX-R8T is specified for 13.8VDC +/- 15% which means it will operate correctly over a range of 11.8 to 15.8VDC. It is specified for a maximum current draw of 1A so a supply in the range of 2A to 3A is perfect for powering the receiver.

A linear supply of this rating is small enough that size and weight should not normally be a concern. Good quality linear supplies, like Astron, contain an over-voltage circuit to protect the radio from high voltages should the pass transistor(s) in the power supply fail. If the supply goes out of regulation and attempts to apply too much voltage to the radio, an SCR will fire, shorting the output of the supply, bringing the applied voltage to near zero, and usually blowing the power supply's power line fuse.
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WA4053SWL
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« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2012, 12:16:22 PM »

Well, thank you all for the reply,
Bought by ebay a regulated power supply 13.8v and 3 amp.
Thanks again guys.
Have a nice day.
73 george
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