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Author Topic: New Shack In Planning  (Read 8051 times)
AB3MT
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Posts: 15




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« on: April 15, 2012, 05:40:52 AM »

I'm dead set on the following items. What else do I need to make it all work. I need the proper power supplies, cables for the weather station, coax and grounding supplies. What else should I consider?

http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/hamhf/0480.html

http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/hamants/2396.html

http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/fm_txvrs/0710.html

http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/hamants/4636.html

http://www.weathershack.com/davis-instruments/6152c.html

http://www.weathershack.com/davis-instruments/davis-accessories/6540.html
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KF5JOT
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« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2012, 06:46:57 AM »

A quick check on the power requirements and making the assumption that you want both radios on at the same time, you need 41 amps minimum for the 480 and 13 amps for the 710 to run full power. Depending on space and backup capability, a 50 amp supply and a 25 amp supply would have you covered. I personally wouldn't go for a single supply that would cover both at one time as I don't see me ever running multiple radios at full power simultaneously.

The Davis instruments appear to have a solar charger for the remote head for one installation, the other gets it power from the inside unit via com cabling from what I saw.

Coax, interconnect cabling, grounding supplies and all the other little things are so subjective based on personal likes and your shack, so it's tough to call out stuff. In my old operating area, I used to have a clock, a smooth writing surface and a low level task light along with a very comfortable chair.  When the new one goes in later this year, I'm sure it will evolve heavily as it has to be both my shop office and radio room. I'd be willing to be that it won't be long after you do the initial setup that you start refining the operating area and adjusting it to how you use it.

Don't skimp on the AC circuits and ambient lighting. If at all possible. make sure lighting and radio power supplies are not on the same circuit. It's no fun to be working in a darkened room and trip the circuit that also runs the lighting....been there before.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2012, 07:06:28 AM »

If you have the room and the resources, I would recommend a false wall to set your operating desk/bench against, with a couple of feet between it and the real wall.  This is to have a 'crawlspace' to run cables and keep the shack looking neat--something that may be considered essential if the shack is also a business office.

I won't comment on equipment as I consider that personal preference, but on layout, I would get a desk--a real business desk--with one 8.5 x 11 file drawer and no center drawer.  In this way, you can keep all the paperwork associated with your station in that file drawer and keep all tools and ancillary equipment out of sight/reach of guests.

For equipment shelves, I would get two 6 foot by 18 inch reinforced hollow core doors and mounted them to the wall.  They're more than adaquate to hold rigs and equipment, and slots or ports could be cut through the false wall to run cabling.  Keeps everything looking neat and professional.

Good luck and 73!
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W8JX
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« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2012, 08:44:52 AM »

A quick check on the power requirements and making the assumption that you want both radios on at the same time, you need 41 amps minimum for the 480

The 480 will use less. My 480 SAT draw under 20a at 100 watts out and second connector on HX only power extra final and no logic. Real world closer to 35 amp peak.
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AB3MT
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« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2012, 09:07:13 AM »

Good stuff. I have the room and a tower already. Looking for more specifics on actual makes and models of recommended power supplies and any additional items. Links to where to buy the items. Size of coax for a 50' + run. What cable do I need between weather station and the radio? Where do I find all that at good quality? Is there any other station must haves for this to be a functional station? Grounding the equipment, tower and surge protection on the coax is also a concern.
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NA4IT
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« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2012, 11:14:37 AM »

30 - 45AMP power supply / charger from http://cascadeaudio.com/power_converters/power_converters.htm and a decent size amp hour battery (at least 100AH).

Check my website and see mine... http://www.qsl.net/na4it
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WA2ONH
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« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2012, 06:08:25 PM »

From the Blog of KB6NU as supplied by K8JHR in ...

Building a New Shack?
March 16, 2012 by K8JHR


Richards K8JHR, originally posted this to the HamRadioHelpGroup mailing list. I thought it was so good that I asked if I could post it here. Now, if only my shack had all these features…….. Dan

Here are a couple of considerations to ponder when building a new shack. ( ...more )

LINK: http://www.kb6nu.com/building-a-new-shack/

Wish I could be doing the same. Good Luck!
« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 06:10:00 PM by WA2ONH » Logged

73 de WA2ONH dit dit    ...Charlie
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"No time is ever wasted that is spent LEARNING something!"
WX7G
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« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2012, 06:32:34 PM »

NO!!!

The Comet antenna you have chosen is essentially a leaky dummy load. It is a wideband terminated antenna having VERY low radiation efficiency.
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AB3MT
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Posts: 15




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« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2012, 09:34:14 AM »

Suggestions on a HF vertical. Please Huh

NO!!!

The Comet antenna you have chosen is essentially a leaky dummy load. It is a wideband terminated antenna having VERY low radiation efficiency.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20545




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« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2012, 09:58:27 AM »

Suggestions on a HF vertical. Please Huh

NO!!!

The Comet antenna you have chosen is essentially a leaky dummy load. It is a wideband terminated antenna having VERY low radiation efficiency.

Do you have any antenna restrictions?  What will support the HF vertical?  What bands do you want to operate?  How much space do you have for the vertical and possibly required wire radials below it?
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AB3MT
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Posts: 15




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« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2012, 10:43:17 AM »

50' tower no restrictions must be a vertical to operate on that HF radio I have listed and no ground wires

Suggestions on a HF vertical. Please Huh

NO!!!

The Comet antenna you have chosen is essentially a leaky dummy load. It is a wideband terminated antenna having VERY low radiation efficiency.

Do you have any antenna restrictions?  What will support the HF vertical?  What bands do you want to operate?  How much space do you have for the vertical and possibly required wire radials below it?
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2012, 11:08:11 AM »

An HF vertical installed on a 50' tower is a unique situation that really requires some thought and possibly some engineering effort.

Most HF verticals work a lot better with radial wires, and that's problematic on a tower (not to mention making it very difficult to ever "rotate" an antenna up there in the future).

Also, many if not most really good HF verticals are not fully self-supporting in high winds.  Almost all of them recommend guying (using lightweight ropes) to support them over long periods of time.  Most will support themselves up to 40-50 mph winds, but in my experience most start failing with wind speeds above that -- and almost anyplace can have wind gusts above that.

This is one HF vertical that does not require wire radials, however the instructions strongly recommend guying when exposed to high winds (see page 6, and I think they're being optimistic):  http://www.hy-gain.com/pdffiles/AV-640.pdf

This is one HF vertical that does not require wire radials and they claim it will withstand 80 mph winds.  Again, I think that's pretty optimistic, but maybe: http://www.cushcraftamateur.com/pdffiles/R-8.pdf

This is one HF vertical that does not require wire radials and they don't seem to make any recommendations one way or the other about guying, so it might survive alone: http://www.mfjenterprises.com/pdffiles/MFJ-1798.pdf

This is one HF vertical that does not require wire radials but they do strongly recommend guying it if it's mounted at an elevated position (see paragraph 1.4): http://www.gapantenna.com/files/TitanSinglePage.pdf

So there are surely some options.  I would not use the Comet antenna you originally listed.
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AB3MT
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« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2012, 11:15:01 AM »

How about this?

http://www.jetstream-usa.com/jtv680.shtml
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2012, 11:42:52 AM »

That's a Chinese knock-off of the Comet CHA-250B vertical.  Same antenna, just made in China and cheaper.
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VE3FMC
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« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2012, 03:44:43 PM »

50' tower no restrictions must be a vertical to operate on that HF radio I have listed and no ground wires


I don't want to sound rude by why does it have to be a vertical on top of that 50 foot tower?

If I had a 50 foot tower up there would be a yagi on top of it. Mount the vertical on the ground where you can load it up with radials.

So enlighten me and others as to why there has to be a vertical up on the tower? If you have no restrictions then put a beam up. Then hang a 80/40 fan dipole off an arm at the 50 foot level and you would be good to go.
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