Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Baofeng UV-5R HT  (Read 29435 times)
VIPER21700
Member

Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: August 15, 2012, 06:50:52 PM »

Ive got a UV5R, and I have to say, for a beginner HAM, but a long time military radio operator, its a good starter radio to make sure its something youre interested in and want to continue. The battery life is great, Ive had mine on for almost five days during the daytime with no charge, and it just went dead tonight. The antenna on it sucks, go get yourself a Diamond SRJ77CA for it, you will be much happier. I was hitting repeaters tonight with mine when my friend standing next to me couldnt (he had a Yaesu ht)
The price is right, and its a fairly sturdy peice of kit. Plus, for a backup, its a really good deal.
IMHO

Mike
KK4JAK
Logged
W0EAJ
Member

Posts: 15




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: December 24, 2012, 11:02:54 AM »

For $40 I guess it's worth the headaches.  Damned POOR manual, and not much is intuitive.  My Ken. TH-F6 runs circles around it, but then again, it COST MORE.  NOT recommended for newbies, as the frustration level will scare them away from the hobby.
Logged
KE4VVF
Member

Posts: 61




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: December 24, 2012, 09:57:50 PM »

I have one and use it often.   The UV-5R is not bad considering it's limitations. 

The first thing you have to do is replace the short duck antenna. I got the MFJ-1717S and it works excellent. Watch out for the poor off frequency signal rejection.  If you connect it to a high gain outside antenna with over 6.5 dBi 2m gain the unit pulls in all kinds of off frequency garbage, especially the 162 Mhz weather broadcasts. The receiver has poor rejection and it's best performance is with a duck, 1/4 and 5/8 wave antennas where the erroneous signals are weaker.  Attaching it to your typical portable and mobile antennas and it works just fine.

Programming it is a nightmare unless you do it through the computer interface.

The squelch sucks. It really needs an RF squelch knob that goes from S0 to S8.

No S meter. UGGGH!

Scanning is dreadfully slow when all the memories are full.  Consider scanning only the frequencies that you use the most, blocking the scan mode of the others via programming, so you don't miss calls.

The UV-5R does have excellent battery consumption on the maximum battery save mode. Adding a 3600 mAh optional battery is simply fabulous. I can go a week using receive only with the large capacity battery.

Overall I'd give it a 6 out of 10.  It's worth the price you pay for it, but don't expect the stellar performance of an expensive HT.
Logged
N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9921




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: January 03, 2013, 02:45:45 PM »

I have a uv-3r and a uv 5 r, and a couple of alincos, a couple of Yaesu's and a couple of Motorola's and somewhere around here is an Icom HT.  I bought my first uv-3r to play with, and ended up giving it to a new ham . I always have a cheep HT or 2 laying around  and often give one out after a youngster  gets  their Tech licence as their first radio.

The uv 3 and 5 r are ok little radios, and I always program  in a repeater or two before giving them away. Once they get on a repeater, they can ask for help programming the radios on the repeater.  Its  a hobby and this is one of my ways to give back to the hobby,.
Logged
N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9921




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: January 05, 2013, 03:52:35 PM »

An as an aside, to address the comment of reverse engineering and such.  Don Johnson, who is known as the father of the Screwdrive antenna, and made them  virtually up to his death, was reverse engineered, copied and  ripped off for years.  I think only a few of the companies ever even ask for permission to copy his  efforts, but I know a few did.  HE could have been a fairly wealthy man buy eatheir collecting a royalty or suing folks who "stole" his ideas.  But Don was a rich man he and his wife were rich beyond belief with the thousands of friends, both ham and non ham, that knew and cared for him and his wife.  Mr. Don Johnson, father of the DK_3 will always have a place in the heart of hams every where.  Gods Speed Don.
Logged
W0EAJ
Member

Posts: 15




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: January 15, 2013, 09:16:06 PM »

Mine was bought with a malfunctioning PTT switch, so took it apart and straightened the rubber plunger... It still had a problem in that it WOULD transmit, but on occasion,. would only stay on for about .5 second, then drop out of xmit.  On other occasions, it worked perfectly.  As such I'm moving "up" to the new version.  For a beginning ham or one that just needs a couple for tower work, etc... it's perfect.  As it's already type-accepted commercial, it can be used on those freqs. too (I'm in the fire alarm biz, and they're perfect for inspection radios).  Oh, and if it's in dual-watch mode, and you turn it off, it always returns to the TOP freq, even if it's locked - annoying, but no biggie.   Tom / Denver
Logged
SXHARR05
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: May 05, 2013, 09:15:40 PM »

Are any of you using the UV-5R in vehicle with a mount (Mount Guys, Ram etc) and if so, which style? I'm thinking of picking up a mount, but there obviously no listing for the Baofeng. Will a mount for a Wouxun work?

KB3USY
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6055




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: May 06, 2013, 04:41:24 AM »

...As it's already type-accepted commercial, it can be used on those freqs. too (I'm in the fire alarm biz, and they're perfect for inspection radios)...

Here we go again--promoting the use of these radios on frequencies where such frequencies have to be licensed to be used legally.

If bought as ham radios, it is ILLEGAL to use these radios outside of the ham radio bands unless the user is licensed for the frequency that they're going to use AND the radio is type accepted for that band.  We, as hams, are NOT supposed to be using or promoting such use according to the agreement we signed to get our ham license.  And yes--you DID sign it if you have your ham ticket--right on your application!
Logged
KD8POH
Member

Posts: 3




Ignore
« Reply #38 on: May 12, 2013, 02:08:15 AM »

K1CJS, respectfully, some hams also hold business radio licenses or work as firefighters, EMTs, etc. I don't see how simply mentioning that the UV-5R also works outside of ham bands is such a bad thing. Information is information. I don't think licensed hams are the ones we need to worry about, as most are very respectful of bands and frequencies.

Back to the radio - I have used several UV-5Rs and they are solid radios. They have a reputation for being difficult to program, however, I have not had major issues with this. If it is useful to somebody, I am working on putting together a Baofeng UV-5R programming guide here. It is not 100% complete yet, but I think it is more clear than the Chinese-translated manual.

73s -
KD8POH
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6055




Ignore
« Reply #39 on: May 12, 2013, 07:52:09 AM »

OK, but respectfully, using such a radio for more than one service seems to be asking for trouble.  First, business band radios are not supposed to be field programmable.  It's too easy to slip up and make a mistake--even if you're not trying to do any programming!  As you said yourself, those radios are not the easiest things to program.  Also, what if you're on your business frequency--and you go ahead and use the radio on what you thought was the local repeater.  The other business users may not be too happy about it.  They may get even more upset if you go and put business info over the local ham repeater!

All too much today, the push is on to multipurpose just about anything.  Go ahead and call me an old curmudgeon, but with separate radio services, I still believe in having separate radios.  It makes better sense than keeping on slipping up with one multi-purposed radio--that may well eventually get the user in serious hot water.  73.


Logged
VE5EIS
Member

Posts: 52


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #40 on: May 13, 2013, 08:59:33 PM »

These radios are easy to program if you use CHIRP.  It only took me a few minutes to do the programming.  It's also very easy to manually select channels (even repeaters as long as the offset amount is standard; direction can be non-standard however).  This is done in a separate mode so it's easy to avoid the manual mode if you prefer.

It would be useful to know how to program the radio manually in the field, but I carry a netbook everywhere I go so it's not a problem for me.

Yes, you need to be slightly careful with this radio but since I always use it in channel mode, all I can select are channels I've configured so no out-of-band operation can happen.
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6055




Ignore
« Reply #41 on: May 14, 2013, 07:48:12 AM »

Trying it again.  Let's say you have ham frequencies programmed into the radio along with 'other' frequencies.  All it takes is a bump to the channel selector to change the channel and put the radio onto a different channel than the one you think it's on.  I'm not speaking of programming at all right now. 

It's still a bad idea to multi-purpose such a radio--and a bad idea for the FCC to permit such radios in the first place.
Logged
VE5EIS
Member

Posts: 52


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #42 on: May 14, 2013, 05:36:56 PM »

You can disable transmission on any programmed channel and make it receive-only at that frequency.  You have to manually select this during programming (CHIRP supports it but I've never tried to do this directly on the radio)... so the risks can be avoided pretty easily.  It would still be easy to accidentally change to another programmed channel but that's a risk with any radio.

I guess I figure that hams know what they're doing, or ought to, given the education required to attain a license or certificate.  While there are risks, they are reasonably small.  I certainly would not recommend these radios for the layperson.
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6055




Ignore
« Reply #43 on: May 15, 2013, 10:11:56 AM »

You can disable transmission on any programmed channel and make it receive-only at that frequency.  You have to manually select this during programming (CHIRP supports it but I've never tried to do this directly on the radio)... so the risks can be avoided pretty easily.  It would still be easy to accidentally change to another programmed channel but that's a risk with any radio.

I guess I figure that hams know what they're doing, or ought to, given the education required to attain a license or certificate.  While there are risks, they are reasonably small.  I certainly would not recommend these radios for the layperson.

You're still not hearing what I'm saying.  If the programmed channels for TWO services are together on any radio of this type it's too easy to use incorrect identification on either band if you think the radio is currently on a frequency in the other band.  What may be a 'whoops' situation if you transmit on the wrong frequency may well become another thing entirely if that information is transmitted in the wrong band.

As far as the 'education' needed to obtain a ham license---you've got to be kidding!  NONE is required, all that is needed is a good ability to memorize.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!