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Author Topic: Question about running feedlines  (Read 2537 times)
KF5PGT
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Posts: 38




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« on: April 22, 2012, 06:40:26 PM »

So I had an idea earlier today. I was thinking about running 1 1/2" PVC with an elbow on one end down the inside of the wall in my shack to make dropping antenna feed lines easier. My question is if I have have say three different feed lines from three different antenna (2m, 10m, 80m) all run right next to each other in the PVC, will I have any interference problems?
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WV4L
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« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2012, 06:47:01 PM »

Nope.
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KF5PGT
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« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2012, 06:57:20 PM »

Simple and to the point. I salute you for it!
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2012, 08:04:08 PM »

Better to use a "sweep" than an elbow - both turn 90 degrees, but the "sweep" is
much easier to pull cables through.  (That's why you find them in the electrical
department because they are used for wiring.

And make sure you leave a pull rope in among the cables for pulling more through
in the future.
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KB4QAA
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« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2012, 02:20:24 PM »

You might want to consider using cosmetic cable raceway intended for use inside offices and such.  It usually has a base you screw down (or has adhesive) and a snap-on cover to hide the LAN cables.  Looks nice and is accessible along the full length.

http://cableorganizer.com/cable-raceway/
Just for example this company has all sorts.  You can probably find similar at your local hardware store.

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N8CBX
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2012, 02:56:01 PM »

If one ran their coax cables into a "metal" conduit, would that be beneficial in looking like a choke to a lighting strike or not?
Jan
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W5DXP
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« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2012, 05:47:53 AM »

We don't "choke" lightning.  Smiley We give it an alternate path to ground.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2012, 08:52:23 AM »

No, no problem at all--provided the feedlines are all coax cable.  Try to run twinline or ladder line next to another feedline, and you'll have problems.

I only mention this because you didn't specify the feedline type.
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W4LGC
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« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2012, 03:12:12 PM »

I have only two recommendations; WB6BYU already noted one of them-
1. Use 2" instead of 1 1/2"
2. Use 90 degree sweeps
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W9GB
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« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2012, 04:25:19 PM »

Conduit Fill Calculator
http://www.southwire.com/ProductCatalog/CalculatorController

The NEC Code Book 2008 has the specifications, standards, and formula for conduit "fill" (capacity).  
Use the OD of your coax (0.405 for RG-213/U)
There is even an iPhone / iPad application !

IF you desire to run AC from your house to base of tower ... run a separate conduit for this AC circuit,
as required the NEC.  Some municipalities require metallic or specific PVC schedule.

USE Electrical conduit (not plumbing PVC) ... Low-voltage and RF coax as defined by NEC
and select the larger size (2 inch PVC, schedule 40?) ... when possible.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2012, 04:44:46 PM by W9GB » Logged
K4RVN
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« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2012, 07:40:38 PM »

You can use a long radius PVC elbow or sweep which would make turning the corner easier as posted by others. They are avaiable in plumbing  as schedule 40 usually white at Lowes, or gray elecrical conduit . I have used both where no inspector was required. If exposed to the sun, I would use the electrical conduit.

Frank
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WA2LLN
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« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2012, 08:42:51 AM »

As others suggested, using a sweep rather than an elbow at the bottom end of the pipe will make pulling cables easier, but a sweep won't fit entirely inside a 2x4 stud wall.  You'll need a fairly long slot in the wall to clear it.

An elbow that -does- fit inside the wall is going to make pulling cables pretty difficult, and as that pipe fills up its going to be nearly impossible to pull new cables.

So if you do run a pipe inside the wall, I think you should go with a sweep despite it being a little ugly.

The surface-mounted chase idea is a good one, if you don't mind the appearance. You'll need a hole in the ceiling at the top end of the chase. And since you can remove the cover for the full length of the chase, adding new cables is trivial. You don't need an elbow or any other accessory at the bottom. Just terminate the chase a foot or so off the floor.
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KD0UN
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« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2012, 10:59:17 AM »

If the sweep is an issue, integrate a plastic conduit elbow.  These have a door on the backside for pulling the wire and then redirecting in the new direction.   Using one of these would allow use of larger conduit -- plastic isn't that expensive.
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WA2LLN
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« Reply #13 on: April 25, 2012, 04:56:57 PM »

re: Conduit elbow - an LR or LL might work, putting the "door" on the side, but you'd need an access hole in the wall to get to it. An LB would require an access hole in the wall behind the elbow.
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AC5WA
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« Reply #14 on: April 25, 2012, 05:31:09 PM »

Be certain to put a wad of screen wire or a stainless pot scrubber in the pipe to keep out critters and other uninvited guests.
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