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Author Topic: One power supply for 2 transceivers  (Read 3000 times)
KI6BQI
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Posts: 4




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« on: April 13, 2012, 05:07:47 PM »

I know this should be a simple matter. But I must ask nevertheless.  I wish to connect two transceivers to one power supply and I am wondering what type of connector best serves this purpose.  My power supply is a Pyramid PS-21KX 20 amp unit. One radio is an IC-718 and the other is Yaesu 7900R. I do not plan on having both on at the same time. The Pyramid power supply has but two terminals - red and black.  Is it a matter of merely doubling up the wires on the connectors - 2 on red, 2 on black ?  Is there a product out there that deals with this, for instance a switch of some sort?  I seek some guidance if you please.  Thank you in advance.
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W9GB
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Posts: 2597




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« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2012, 05:13:43 PM »

Joe -

Common question, as the Radio Shack grows.  
Many amateur use one or two 13.8 VDC power supplies with enough current capacity (amperage) to handle
the radios and various accessories.

Just like your automobile has one alternator and battery, a fuse block serves as the distribution point for the DC power.
There are many ways to do this, but I like clean, easy, plug-n-play style solutions.
http://www.powerwerx.com/powerpole-power-distribution/

You may desire the "ease of use" to standardize on a common DC power connector,
such as the PowerPole, commonly used by ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Service) stations.

PowerWerx in Brea, CA offers many solutions and options:
http://www.powerwerx.com/

==
w9gb
« Last Edit: April 13, 2012, 05:19:15 PM by W9GB » Logged
WB6BYU
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Posts: 13018




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« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2012, 05:18:15 PM »

Yes, the simple approach is to connect two wires to RED and two to BLACK.

I use the Anderson connectors - you can put a pair on short wires on the
supply then make a two-way adaptor, or plug it into a device such as a
RigRunner that is a multi-way splitter with separate fuses for each rig.
In fact, all my batteries and power supplies now have Anderson connectors
regardless of what sort of terminal is provided, so I can use any rig with
any power source.  Since the terminals are genderless I can also plug a
battery into a power supply to charge it.

The power supply should allow you to receive on both rigs at the same time, and to
transmit on 2m while also receiving on HF.  But it may be marginal for trying to
transmit at full power on HF while also having the 2m rig switched on.
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3651




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« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2012, 06:03:06 PM »

BQI:  Been down this road.  After many years of doubling up wires, using separate connectors, etc.  I finally found this item on sale.  Just something for you to think about. Works fine for me!  You can connect two radios plus several accessories.

http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/72-6627
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KI6BQI
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2012, 06:30:40 PM »

Thank you all !!!  I had no idea those products were out there.  With the information provided, I can now choose one of the options and I'm sure it will do just fine. 
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2763




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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2012, 10:27:02 PM »

I have an MFJ power strip very similar to the one AXW linked to.  It works just fine, with HF, V/UHF, keyer and a few other accessories connected.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
N6AJR
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Posts: 9889




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« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2012, 12:11:26 PM »

I have several power supplies form 30 to 70 amps.  I use most of the time, a strip made for Andreson power poles,  one input and multiple outputs.  I use Anderson  power poles on everything, in the shack and mobile.  lots of different setups and not too expensive, But yes,  2 wires to to each pole, and if you solder or crimp on some nice ring terminals, it will look nice too.
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AD6KA
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Posts: 2232




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« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2012, 02:35:56 PM »

One terrific advantage of using a power strip(s)
is that it makes it SO much easier to add
low current 12v accessories (PWR Meters, SWR Bridges,
sound card interfaces, level converters, QRP rigs, etc.) to your shack
without turning it into a rats nest with wall warts
and stray wires everywhere.
Grin

Good luck with your project OM,
whichever way you decide to go.
73, Ken  AD6KA
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W9GB
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Posts: 2597




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« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2012, 03:11:11 PM »

Ken, AD6KA makes a good point about the wall-warts, etc. for various 12 VDC accessories.
That was one reason I converted everything to the ARES PowerPoles over 10 years ago.  
Makes life so much easier for changing equipment (reconfig) in the radio room.

The binding post strip, that K8AXW and K7KBN mention, have been around for several years and featured in older ARRL Handbooks.
In 1970s, I used the 4-pin nylon Molex connector -- which was very popular and then ARES standard.  They were sold at every Radio Shack in USA.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 03:13:35 PM by W9GB » Logged
K3GM
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Posts: 1767




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« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2012, 06:37:32 PM »

I do it like this:
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a96/TwoSevenRight/Shack_power_bus.jpg
I grabbed a hand tap and tapped two 3/4" wide by 1/4" thick by 5' long aluminum bars with a bunch of 1/4-20 threads, mounted them to a piece of pine, then mounted that to the back of my desk.  The supply wires (foreground) are fused in the event the bars are ever shorted (It's never happened though).  Below the supply bus is a copper bus bar that connects all equipment cases together and back to the house safety ground through the third prong on the 12V power supply's plug.  Doing it this way allows me to spread out the many 12VDC connections across the back of the desk and makes for a fairly neat wiring scheme despite how it currently looks in the picture!
« Last Edit: April 22, 2012, 01:08:20 PM by K3GM » Logged
KG4NEL
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Posts: 373




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« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2012, 10:44:31 AM »

I went to Powerpoles a few years ago.

Never going back Cheesy Makes things so much easier.
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W6CD
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Posts: 213


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« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2012, 09:47:05 PM »

I went to Powerpoles a few years ago.

Never going back Cheesy Makes things so much easier.


ditto!
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N4CR
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Posts: 1650




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« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2012, 04:47:49 AM »

I make my own distribution point with 30A power poles and these:

http://www.hamcq.com/powerpoles/powerpole-mounts/powerpole-snap-in-receptacle-chassis-mount-for-8-powerpoles/prod_368.html

They also sell one half that size if you don't want 4 power pairs. I had an old Radio Shack power distribution bar that all of the banana plugs had failed. I removed the banana plugs, cut square holes and put these chassis mount receptacles in. It's working great and kept me from tossing out the old broken stuff. Plus it has a power switch, an LED and volt meter built in as a bonus.
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
KI6BQI
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2012, 07:22:27 PM »

 Again, thank you everyone for sharing your ideas and experiences.  It tells me that there is more than one solution.  Everyone has a favorite, everyone has a story to tell.  After reading input I went to You Tube and found helpful videos of what these products looks like and how to use them.  Smiley
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