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Author Topic: My TS-450 is back from repair  (Read 6951 times)
N0SQ
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Posts: 53




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« on: May 02, 2012, 07:41:16 PM »

Just back from FTH. Just under $300 to replace just a tunable coil & lithium battery!!!!! The labor
rate is $70 an hour but I doubt that it took them that long to replace the
coil and definitely not long to replace the battery.  Shocked Angry I don't know what happened to that coil or what part of the receiver circuit that it was located. But,to put a positive spin on this, the radio is working great again.
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3646




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« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2012, 09:32:11 PM »

SQ:  Now you crawl off and lick your wounds!  The pain will go away eventually.   Cry

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KE3WD
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Posts: 5694




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« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2012, 01:29:01 AM »

It may well have taken some amount of troubleshooting time to locate the bad coil.  

On top of that, it is then more than just replacing the coil and good to go, after replacing the coil, typically some level of alignment is necessary.  

Also might take some time for disassembly/reassembly in order to get to the location of said coil on a 450. 

And then, the good technician must also check all functions for full operation after reassembly.  Or you would be on here whining about "something else broken" after repair. 

The greater majority of technicians are honest, no matter what amateur radio appliance operator cheapskates think.  

« Last Edit: May 03, 2012, 01:32:33 AM by KE3WD » Logged
N4NYY
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Posts: 4742




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« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2012, 08:19:34 AM »

Just back from FTH. Just under $300 to replace just a tunable coil & lithium battery!!!!! The labor
rate is $70 an hour but I doubt that it took them that long to replace the
coil and definitely not long to replace the battery.  Shocked Angry I don't know what happened to that coil or what part of the receiver circuit that it was located. But,to put a positive spin on this, the radio is working great again.

Most labor rate include everything, from receiving the radio, disassembly, reassembly,  repair, etc. That is a comparable rate. I do repair myself if I know what is wrong and can replace the part. In this case, if I knew what was wrong, I would do it myself. What I would send the rig out for is any alignments, or troubleshooting where I could not find the problem.

Many of these rigs are not difficult to work with. You have to pick your spots on when to send it in.
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K2LGO
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Posts: 113




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« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2012, 09:51:02 AM »

Just back from FTH....Who is FTH  HuhHuh
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N5VTU
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Posts: 347




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« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2012, 03:36:11 PM »

Just back from FTH....Who is FTH  HuhHuh

Maybe these guys -http://fthgroupinc.com/

It's what came up when I searched Kenwood Repair Centers on Google.


Stephen
N5VTU
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KA5IPF
Member

Posts: 979


WWW

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« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2012, 07:15:13 AM »

Just back from FTH. Just under $300 to replace just a tunable coil & lithium battery!!!!! The labor
rate is $70 an hour but I doubt that it took them that long to replace the
coil and definitely not long to replace the battery.  Shocked Angry I don't know what happened to that coil or what part of the receiver circuit that it was located. But,to put a positive spin on this, the radio is working great again.

And when you sent the radio in did you inform them which coil needed to be replaced? And how much re-alignment would be needed after replacement?

The cost for replacing the coil is minimal, knowing which one to replace is the key.

Clif
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N1CX
Member

Posts: 120




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« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2012, 05:42:34 AM »

I've been a commercial radio tech for many many years. This is why I don't typically work for hams. My labor rate is $85 an hour and I discount to no-one. If you did the math on what it takes to live in the state of Mass that is the lowest rate I can charge and justify paying taxes-health, property, income, sales, excise etc insurance policies, telephone, plus whose paying for me to keep my equipment up to 2012 standards. You haven't priced a service monitor lately have you.....

If you didnt want to pay someone else to work on it then why didn't you open it up yourself and troubleshoot it and fix it. Isnt that part of what ham radio is all about?

Is that lithium battery soldered in? Do you have any clue what it takes to get a digital board out of a ts450 to get to said solder joints?

What's the component number of the coil, the schematics are online, figure out what/where it is and if it jives with the problem you had if you think you got screwed.
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W9GB
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Posts: 2597




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« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2012, 06:22:33 AM »

Quote
Just under $300 to replace just a tunable coil & lithium battery!!!!! The labor
rate is $70 an hour but I doubt that it took them that long to replace the
coil and definitely not long to replace the battery.
You have not worked on many automobiles in the past 20 years .....
It is common to take more time (disassembly) to get to the part for replacement --
 than the part itself.  The 1999 Honda Accord is a good example -- to replace the alternator or water pump.
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W4PGM
Member

Posts: 18




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« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2012, 06:53:01 AM »

Just back from FTH. Just under $300 to replace just a tunable coil & lithium battery!!!!! The labor
rate is $70 an hour but I doubt that it took them that long to replace the
coil and definitely not long to replace the battery.  Shocked Angry I don't know what happened to that coil or what part of the receiver circuit that it was located. But,to put a positive spin on this, the radio is working great again.

I work on quite few radios for locals who cannot afford to send them out.   They have to live with the fact that this is not my full time job, I may not get to for a month or more and that they pay for parts and shipping of the parts.  I do keep a time log and many times I spend three or four hours on a radio (over a few day) before they are ready to return.  I spent 5 hours on a TM-732 trying to find where the 5v trace was broken in the control head and then fixing the PCB where the traces were etched away(leaky chipcap.)  Granted I do not do this full time and when I see recurring problems (ceramic filters on Yaesu an Kenwood radios) the  repairs are quite a bit faster.  To replace on of the ceramic filters on a FT-1802 it takes about an hour.  This repair is not economical if done at the factory even through the parts are $0.56, yes fifty six cents.

I always give the parts back and always ask for the parts back when I have something repaired. 
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K5LXP
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Posts: 4448


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« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2012, 07:11:09 AM »

I've been a commercial radio tech for many many years. This is why I don't typically work for hams.

Bingo!  Besides most hams not really understanding what it takes to fix equipment and me giving away far more bench time than I should, I grew weary of "owning" every radio I ever repaired, being accountable for every problem the radio ever had henceforth to me working on it.  So now I only work on my own stuff and won't even touch another op's stuff, even if it's an "easy fix".  Even basic, simple repairs like changing a broken volume control or connector can add up to a significant portion of a unit's value depending on what it takes to get at them, when you're paying by hour.

Ham radios are consumer grade electronics, and should be treated as such.  People don't think twice about replacing a 5 year old TV, so why go through extraordinary measures to keep an old radio going?  By spending big bucks to get them fixed, all you're doing is buying them twice but the radio isn't any newer. 


I spent 5 hours on a TM-732 trying to find where the 5v trace was broken in the control head and then fixing the PCB where the traces were etched away(leaky chipcap.)

Perfect example.  Did you charge $350 labor for this 20 year old radio worth about 1/2 that value?  I get that you're doing it as a favor, but I was taken advantage of too many times to be charitable about it anymore.  People figure why send it to a shop, when we can cry the blues about the cost and get ol' LXP to do it.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM


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WD5GWY
Member

Posts: 390




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« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2012, 10:27:41 AM »

Might as well throw in my 2 cents!  Cheesy
  I look at it this way. If I can repair it, then I do the work.
Sometimes, I end up doing more (and spending more) than
if I had paid a pro to do the work instead.
If on the other hand, I see that I cannot repair something
(those @#$*& SMD devices) I GLADLY pay someone with
the right tools and steady hands (damn old age) to do the
repair work. More so, if it is a radio I really enjoy using and
want to keep. I know that I'll never get back what I have in it.
But, who cares? If I am happy with it, that is all that matters to
me.
   And it is one reason I like boat anchors! Some of those, I can
actually repair!!!  Grin
james
WD5GWY

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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3646




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« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2012, 11:34:00 AM »

And my two cents!  The last time I worked on a guys radio (A friend - A mobile 2M transceiver) I had what I call a "Sproing!"  That's when I was trying to get a component out and accidentally pushed against a pushbutton switch too hard and it went "sproing" and pieces of it went to hell and gone!  Cost of switch....$25.00 + $6.00 shipping.  Embarrassment of telling my friend that I ruined his radio.... priceless.

That's why I don't work on radios for others!
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