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Author Topic: VHF/UHF On air planes  (Read 5897 times)
KC9KMZ
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Posts: 6




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« on: May 04, 2012, 04:53:04 AM »

 The answer is probably no. But, can you use an HT on an air plane?  Shortly after take off they say you can use computers.The other problem would be you are inside a metal can.
 It would be neat to say portable, commercial plane.   Think of how many contacts you could make while flying across the country?
73
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12980




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« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2012, 05:28:58 AM »

There is no FCC regulation permitting it EXCEPT that you need the pilot's permission. On a commercial airliner with passengers that is not likely to happen because the pilot also has to abide by the airline regulations. On a private or corporate aircraft the pilot may give permission.

A typical commercial airliner doesn't have much window area for the signal to get out of the "metal can". I flew on a private aircraft (only the pilot, copilot, and myself on board) and had a seat right next to a very large window. I made quite a number of contacts on 2M with a 5W HT. The problem is that most people are monitoring a repeater rather than a simplex channel (52). Very often when you key up on a repeater input, you hear several repeaters come back and they interferre with each other.
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AD4U
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« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2012, 05:47:53 AM »

I have tried but I have NEVER been given permission to use a HT on a commercial aircraft.  Not even on "receive".  On the other hand when I am flying a private aircraft (I am a pilot) I always take my HT along for the ride.

As previously posted, when operating on repeater frequencies from an aircraft, you will probably bring up lots of repeaters, and you will not make the users or the owners of those repeaters very happy. 

I make most of my aircraft mobile contacts on 146.520.  Depending on how high you are flying, contacts can be made over 100 miles.

Dick  AD4U
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13459




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« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2012, 12:02:55 PM »

They say you can use computers, but SPECIFICALLY say you can NOT use cell phones
or other radio transmitters or receivers.  The local oscillator in a receiver might interfere
with the aircraft navigation system even if it isn't transmitting.

In a private aircraft you need the permission of the pilot.
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KC9KMZ
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2012, 02:09:35 PM »

Thank you for the input.
 We will see how I feel at the time of the flight. If the Captain is greeting the passangers I might ask. The worst he will say is no. And, I can live with that.  146.520 is probably the best place to try. That way it will eliminate any chance of bringing up multiple repeaters.
 The funny thing is the same day I posted this question the Du page repeater Lunch Bunch asked a similar question. " Do you take your ham equipment on vacation"

73
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K7RBW
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Posts: 398




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« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2012, 09:13:23 AM »

While I was in the Air Force, I would take my HT on tanker hops and operate from the Boomer's spot in the plane (where the operator of the tail boom lies down to work). From there, you could get a clear shot of over 100 miles line-of-sight from 30,000+ feet. But, this was always done with the flight crew's prior permission.

On an airliner, I don't even bother asking. In the U.S., at least, he answer is "No" before I even ask the question.

When I'm the pilot, I'll bring my VX-8R to leave APRS tracks, but I need to figure out a way to integrate the audio into my headsets because it's a bit of pain to use the 'earplug under the headphones" method that I've tried in the past.

I'd be curious to hear how other pilot hams have made airborne QSOs, specifically how they worked the audio (mike/speaker).
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3734




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« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2012, 05:18:33 PM »

hi,

I was on a Southwest flight a few days ago, crew announced
computers and games are OK but NO TV, AM/FM radios, scanners
or monitors and no cell phones unless they are in airplane mode.

73 james
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20633




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« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2012, 02:15:50 PM »

I do remember "a time before portable radios and hand held transmitters were prohibited" on commercial flights.

Seems to me the heavy prohibition started in the mid-1970s.  This is when the flight attendants would actually announce "no radios, no transmitters" allowed to be operated as long as the aircraft doors were closed.  Nobody really had a portable computer back then, and hand held calculators were simple and didn't have microprocessors in them -- I don't recall handheld calculators being prohibited, although some might be today.

First time I flew to Dayton (Hamvention) from NJ (Newark), I think it was on AA or US Air (forget) and in 1973.  The whole plane was full of hams and a lot of us had hand-held 2m rigs and we all used them for the whole flight, both intracabin to chat with each other and also holding them up against windows to work stuff down below.  Lots of fun.  I think we did that again in '74.  Seems to me right after that, the prohibition began.  Or at least that's when we were first advised of a prohibition.
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