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Author Topic: You can work the world on 5 watts  (Read 29087 times)
AE4RV
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« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2012, 07:24:25 AM »

Of course it's true.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2012, 03:15:49 PM »

It may be true, but "Why run QRP when a kilowatt will do?"
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N2RRA
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« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2012, 05:27:20 PM »

It may be true, but "Why run QRP when a kilowatt will do?"

The answer......

When you've gotten used to running a kilowatt working DX around the world isn't a thrill any longer QRP will bring the thrill back.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #18 on: May 09, 2012, 06:14:41 PM »

It may be true, but "Why run QRP when a kilowatt will do?"

Part 97.013(a) An amateur station must use the minimum transmitter power necessary to carry out the desired communications
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KB3YLQ
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« Reply #19 on: May 09, 2012, 06:17:49 PM »

True, lighting up my whole neighborhood with RF would make things much easier, but I love a good challenge. And my neighbors will appreciate not glowing in the dark! Smiley
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N2RRA
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« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2012, 11:27:34 PM »

True, lighting up my whole neighborhood with RF would make things much easier, but I love a good challenge. And my neighbors will appreciate not glowing in the dark! Smiley

Like the last sentence. LOL!
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K0YHV
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« Reply #21 on: May 10, 2012, 08:19:58 AM »

I am up to 86 countries on QRP, with either wire antennas or simple 2 element beams that are below 30 feet in height.  Still a thrill to work someone using 5 watts.  Haven't got 7O6T from Yemen on QRP yet, but did get them with 100 watts and a low dipole.  As others have said, CW works much better than SSB when you are running low power or compromise antennas.  PSK and RTTY aren't too bad either at QRP levels.

John AF5CC
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NU4B
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« Reply #22 on: May 10, 2012, 10:02:57 AM »

It may be true, but "Why run QRP when a kilowatt will do?"

Just goes to the mindset out there.

The vast majority of the time the only time you need a kilowatt to work DX is to break through the other DXers using amps to break through other DXers using amps to break through the other DXers using amps to ............

Many QRPers have worked 7O6T. I worked them last night  - I called up a QRP buddy down the road and he worked them also. I was running a K2 @ 5 watts to a HF5B and he was running a K3 @ 5 watts to a windom.

For DXing a efficient 100 watt station should be all you need 90% of the time. You might actually need some knowledge of propagation.

I haven't run over 5 watts since 1985. I work plenty of DX and have 16,000 DX QSO's since 06/2001. I'm at 293 DXCC countries and 39 zones (5B WAZ count - 162) and have 5B DXCC (with 30, 17, 12 meter endorsements) with 800 individual DX call signs. (If I worked 1 call sign on a particular band I didn't count it on any other band) I'm not using any huge antenna systems. A HF5B, a windom, a HF2V and some homemade 2 element vertical wire yagis.

There are 3 entities I worked with a 100 watts in the early 80's that I haven't worked QRP - Heard Island, Crozet Island, and Navassa Island.

I'm not trying to brag - others have done much better than me. I'm just trying to point out that this "I need an amp to work DX" myth is so wrong. What you need is an efficient station and a knowledgeable op.

The way I see it you can take that amp money and build an great DXing station without an amp - or make the amp suppliers happy and give them your money. (Are there reasons to run a kilowatt - sure - I'm not convinced DX'ing is one of them.)

Of course telling everybody you own an "x" company amp is good for the ego. :>)
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KH6DC
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« Reply #23 on: May 10, 2012, 01:53:46 PM »

What's the definition of QRP?? Is it less than 100w?  Less than 10W?? or Less than 5W??  I've heard different stories from ham buddies on QRP.

73 de Delwyn KH6DC
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73 and Aloha,
de Delwyn, KH6DC
N2RRA
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« Reply #24 on: May 10, 2012, 02:14:30 PM »

What's the definition of QRP?? Is it less than 100w?  Less than 10W?? or Less than 5W??  I've heard different stories from ham buddies on QRP.

73 de Delwyn KH6DC

On SSB a 10w rig is considered QRP because voice average is only about 5 watts. On CW ,or any other digital mode would be 5w or less. Running QRP 5w SSB voice your actually only getting about 3 watts or so out.
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ZENKI
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« Reply #25 on: May 22, 2012, 01:17:32 AM »

A technically ignorant comment, really. RF at ham power levels causes no harm. You neighbors are glowing in the dark from having their cell phones stuck to their ears!

The last thing we need is hams contributing  to the fear mongering surrounding RF radiation.


. And my neighbors will appreciate not glowing in the dark! Smiley
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ZENKI
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« Reply #26 on: May 22, 2012, 01:30:06 AM »

QRP, is a waste of time in the real world. Try calling CQ running QRP and see how far you get. IF QRP was so easy and effective  you would certainly have people answering you especially DX.

 I subscribe more to the  minimum necessary power for communications philosophy, this to me is 20 watts of output.   It would be nice of  all the various contests organizers introduced such a category. 20 watts  is the power level that other hams  will respond to your calls because they can actually hear you and not rely on ESP. You  can  easily work DX on 20 meters by calling CQ on SSB, you cant do this with 5 watts or less. A horizontal dipole at 30 ft and 20 watts is a lot of fun.  Most military forces around the world have chosen this power level for their manpack HF radios for the reason of effectiveness and battery life. IF they  wanted more power  they would have demanded it a long time ago. I have  HF manpack and have worked the world with the whip from 30 meters to 10 meters on 20 watts. If I reduce my power to 5 watts, its a total waste of time.

Its darn shame no ham manufacturer makes a decent 20 watt HF manpack style radio like the mil manpack radios for ham use.  Try 20 watts instead of 5, its still QRP even thought its not techically legal QRP, you will have far more enjoyment at 20 watts. SGC  had the right idea with the SGC2020 transceiver.
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W8JX
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« Reply #27 on: May 22, 2012, 05:33:04 AM »

Running QRP 5w SSB voice your actually only getting about 3 watts or so out.

When you take a average reading this may be true but most of the "intelligence" in a SSB signal is in PEP peaks so this claim is misleading.
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G7DIE
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« Reply #28 on: May 22, 2012, 06:46:04 AM »

QRP, is a waste of time in the real world. Try calling CQ running QRP and see how far you get. IF QRP was so easy and effective  you would certainly have people answering you especially DX.

 I subscribe more to the  minimum necessary power for communications philosophy, this to me is 20 watts of output.   It would be nice of  all the various contests organizers introduced such a category. 20 watts  is the power level that other hams  will respond to your calls because they can actually hear you and not rely on ESP. You  can  easily work DX on 20 meters by calling CQ on SSB, you cant do this with 5 watts or less. A horizontal dipole at 30 ft and 20 watts is a lot of fun.  Most military forces around the world have chosen this power level for their manpack HF radios for the reason of effectiveness and battery life. IF they  wanted more power  they would have demanded it a long time ago. I have  HF manpack and have worked the world with the whip from 30 meters to 10 meters on 20 watts. If I reduce my power to 5 watts, its a total waste of time.

Its darn shame no ham manufacturer makes a decent 20 watt HF manpack style radio like the mil manpack radios for ham use.  Try 20 watts instead of 5, its still QRP even thought its not techically legal QRP, you will have far more enjoyment at 20 watts. SGC  had the right idea with the SGC2020 transceiver.

I'm not sure of the reasons behind your posting, this is the QRP section, the challenge is to work the DX with as little as possible, if it wasn't we might as well call it the QRO section and try and work the World with 1kW.

I've said it before in other threads, I've worked 25,000km with 500mW SSB, and no I don't expect to do this every day, and on every band, that's why it's a challenge, it's like fishing with minimum equipment rather than a deep sea trawler, it's in the challenge, not the certainty, that excites Wink

I'm currently working in Spain and using the callsign EA3/G7DIE/P and I'm still able to work VK6 long path from NE Spain with 5W and a home brew six foot whip, if such things take your fancy, there's a photo on my QRZ page.

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NU4B
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« Reply #29 on: May 22, 2012, 10:41:24 AM »

QRP, is a waste of time in the real world. Try calling CQ running QRP and see how far you get. IF QRP was so easy and effective  you would certainly have people answering you especially DX.

 I subscribe more to the  minimum necessary power for communications philosophy, this to me is 20 watts of output.   It would be nice of  all the various contests organizers introduced such a category. 20 watts  is the power level that other hams  will respond to your calls because they can actually hear you and not rely on ESP. You  can  easily work DX on 20 meters by calling CQ on SSB, you cant do this with 5 watts or less. A horizontal dipole at 30 ft and 20 watts is a lot of fun.  Most military forces around the world have chosen this power level for their manpack HF radios for the reason of effectiveness and battery life. IF they  wanted more power  they would have demanded it a long time ago. I have  HF manpack and have worked the world with the whip from 30 meters to 10 meters on 20 watts. If I reduce my power to 5 watts, its a total waste of time.

Its darn shame no ham manufacturer makes a decent 20 watt HF manpack style radio like the mil manpack radios for ham use.  Try 20 watts instead of 5, its still QRP even thought its not techically legal QRP, you will have far more enjoyment at 20 watts. SGC  had the right idea with the SGC2020 transceiver.

If you know what your doing, its not a problem. I can call CQ and get a little pileup going. Does it happen all the time? No. But then again, I've heard power stations call CQ until they give up. So I don't know how calling CQ is an indicator of anything.

There is no legal QRP power level. If you like operating at 20 watts go for it.
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