Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: First CW QSOs  (Read 6194 times)
KF6VB
Member

Posts: 19




Ignore
« on: May 06, 2012, 08:58:44 AM »

OK,

   Had my first CW QSO in 20 years the other day.  Nothing special, lasted about 5 minutes.  Sweating like a pig.  Concentrating hard enough to cut diamonds.  XYL asked me something, and I snapped at her Smiley.

   I never was that good at CW.  Managed to pass my extra in 1987 by dint of computer practice.  Always found it easier to copy
code groups than conversation or text.   Stuff with actual meaning would distract me, and I'd miss a bunch of characters.

  This morning, I found out something interesting - in the context of a contest, I can do over 20 WPM!  Because very little actual information is being sent.  I QSO'd a 2 and a 1 ( New England QSO Party ).  Their names were both "5NN" Smiley.

   All this scribbling is hurting my fingers.  I need to learn to mill-copy.

                                        - Jerry Kaidor, KF6VB
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3898




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2012, 11:18:38 AM »

Quote
  Sweating like a pig.  Concentrating hard enough to cut diamonds.  XYL asked me something, and I snapped at her .

All three are normal in the beginning.  The last is normal all the time.

Quote
Always found it easier to copy
code groups than conversation or text.   Stuff with actual meaning would distract me, and I'd miss a bunch of characters.

This normal for former military radio operators or intercept operators. 

Quote
  I need to learn to mill-copy.

You lost me on this one.  I thought since you can copy 5 letter code groups you would also know "mill-copy."

Exciting, isn't it?
Logged
KF6VB
Member

Posts: 19




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2012, 08:48:14 PM »

[
Quote
Always found it easier to copy
code groups than conversation or text.   Stuff with actual meaning would distract me, and I'd miss a bunch of characters.

This normal for former military radio operators or intercept operators. 
[/quote]
*** Or for hams who got their license a long time ago.  In my case, around 1970.  Back then, the cw tests were all done with code groups.
You had to go down to the FCC office ( in my case, the Customhouse in San Francisco ).   They also made you send.  It was an experience.

Exciting, isn't it?

*** Yes, it is.  Code is beautiful.  It's like music.

          - Jerry, KF6VB
Logged
PA0BLAH
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2012, 01:45:10 AM »





*** Yes, it is.  Code is beautiful.  It's like music.

          - Jerry, KF6VB


I disagree. Music has rithm 1, .5 ; .25 etc. Morse code  1,3,7

Furthermore: I dislike music strongly, switch it off when I can. Morse code I switch on when I can.

I can make Morse code, I can.t make music, (however passing gas can be interpreted as such)

Bob, PAoBLAH
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 05:27:13 AM by PA0BLAH » Logged
AC4RD
Member

Posts: 1235




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2012, 04:06:32 AM »

   Had my first CW QSO in 20 years the other day.  Nothing special, lasted about 5 minutes. ...  This morning, I found out something interesting - in the context of a contest, I can do over 20 WPM!  Because very little actual information is being sent. 

Jerry, I did the same thing, last winter.  I hadn't used CW more than a tiny bit in 20+ years, since I was a Tech+, but this winter I decided to give it a try again.  I'm having a GREAT time with it--I've worked a nice handful of new countries, played in some contests, and I'm getting close to having a CW DXCC in LOTW.   And one thing I've decided: I'd rather spend 2 hours in a CW pileup than 20 minutes in a phone pileup.

The thing is, I'm STILL lousy at CW after months of use.  You've heard of the "First Class Operators" group?  I'm in the "Remedial Class Operators" group.  Wink   My copying is getting better but my sending is still pretty bad.  But for contests and DXing, the memory buttons on the keyer can do 90% of the sending, and that thing NEVER makes a mistake!   

So I'm sure not good at it, but I'm having a WORLD of fun using CW again!  Hope you do, too!  73!
  --ken ac4rd
Logged
VK2FAK
Member

Posts: 87




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2012, 04:21:39 AM »

Hi all....

Did I read that right.......the Memory Keyer can do 90% of the sending....

Well geez....why am I bothering to sit here right now trying hard to get my straight key sending to a level....so it is not so much of a pain to copy me.........see I do have regard for the person on the other end of the chat...

But the Memory Keyer......no no no.......only my opinion..

John
Logged
PA0BLAH
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2012, 05:26:01 AM »

Hi all....



But the Memory Keyer......no no no.......only my opinion..

John

Believe me John, listening to machine generated text improves your fist, at least it did my fist, because you get used to the sound of correct sent code.
But the guys that have 90% of their text to be sent under their F-knobs are not able to make a QSO in rag chew mode on paddles or a straight key.

Doesn't matter, they quit at the moment you switch to non standard QSO text. May be it stimulates them to learn the code more seriously.  Does cost a lot of effort and nature doesn't help just as with mating in order to reproduce, so don't expect overpopulation of the CW bands with hams that refuse to use computer aided transmission and reception.

However they are bounded to contests,  and hunting wall paper by wai(s)ting hours of valuable time in pile ups.

It is a hobby, so who cares, whatever you are doing; CW: never never BCI and TVI so long as your antenna is not visible for the neighbourhood.   When it is visible: YOU are making BCI and TVI even when you are 2 month abroad.
Logged
2E0OZI
Member

Posts: 270




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2012, 09:28:35 AM »

I'm loving CW as well, and one thing I realised a few weeks ago is that its so effective that a compromise antenna designed for stealth and cheapness can still work fine. Of course G0KYA says that straight off the bat in his book "Stealth Antennas" - something like most successful stealth antenna users are on CW.

Sweating. Yep. Nervous. Yep.

Fun yes indeedy!  Grin
Logged

Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
George Orwell
VK2FAK
Member

Posts: 87




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2012, 03:12:35 AM »

Hi all.

Seems to be a dead give away with the use of the Memory keyer..

Listening this evening  I was copying a very good 3*3 CQ.......no problem there its probably easier on that repetitive CQ call to use the memory..

But the crunch came when a reply came into that CQ.....I gave up on the first over he was having...and thought am I missing the word breaks or is there none....I put the digi software on, just to check.....and no it was not me....2 times there was a 12 letter or more group...totally lost me....

So for me its very misleading for beginners, when people use the Memory for a CQ, then can't back it up in the rest of the QSO..

I have been told to try pick calls that sound like they have a good fist...especially while still learning...so this memory keyer CQ...is as I say, very misleading and not fair to beginners.

John
« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 03:21:06 AM by VK2FAK » Logged
2E0OZI
Member

Posts: 270




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2012, 04:16:50 AM »

No memory keyer here John, just a Central Coast boy on the end of a Czech army key Grin My approach to my first QSOs (which is what I am doing these last few weeks) is "accuracy over speed" and keeping each exchange short and sweet. I also am such a newbie that I use whole words as in a normal conversation from time to time.
Logged

Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
George Orwell
PA0BLAH
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2012, 06:41:49 AM »

"accuracy over speed" and keeping each exchange short and sweet.

Oh really? I prefer speed over accuracy, pity speed is so expensive nowadays.
Logged
2E0OZI
Member

Posts: 270




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2012, 09:06:30 AM »

Dude you want to switch over to steeplehammer, jessopjessopjessop and clarky cat.  Grin Much cheaper. or even cake gives a good high but unfortunately caused a massive swelling of the neck, known in the UK as "Czech Neck".  Shocked
Logged

Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
George Orwell
M0LEP
Member

Posts: 209




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2012, 02:51:57 PM »

Managed a couple of QSOs on 80 metres with a friend this evening. We managed to get callsigns and signal reports both ways both times, but quite a lot of the rest was a muddle. Like music it wasn't. The QSB didn't help. Still, CW QSOs in the log. I hope the next ones will be less terrible...
Logged
2E0OZI
Member

Posts: 270




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2012, 03:33:23 PM »

Tried 2 today one with W9ZA and one with S51WO  - both times my daughter interrupted me to get me come with her and do something, so lost both contacts. But hey, its her birthday. Grin Both would have been cool - but I suppose there will be other times.
Logged

Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
George Orwell
GABRESEVEN
Member

Posts: 20




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: June 06, 2012, 06:25:45 PM »

My first CW QSO was on 10 meters local, with the Elmer who got me started in ham radio.

My second one was on 40 meters with a guy on Guam - QRP no less...

Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!