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Author Topic: My very first QSO - Update  (Read 423 times)
KC9KEP
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Posts: 208


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« on: December 07, 2006, 09:08:24 AM »

Hello all,

And thanks for the comments/replies on my last
"My Very First QSO" message.

And now, I have an addition to make :-)

Not long after my first contact, I made my third
contact, but this time, I used my homebrew 80m
transmitter.

Here's a link to what it looks like:

http://www.bignick.net/Morgan_Radio/Radio_11.htm

I think this was almost more exhilarating than my
first contact.  This was/is my first attempt at
home brewing a transmitter.  It uses a TV horizontal
output tube and is crystal bound.

But, I'll be dogged .. I got a reply right away and
this time, it was K1HTJ from Vermont, about 1020 miles
from my home!

I think that it's so cool to be using a TV tube
and communicating over 1,000 miles .. not to mention
my reported RST of 579.  I thought that I'd be
yodeling out my CW!

I really don't have any way to tell if I'm getting out
of my backyard, so it was a real hoot to realize that
my waves were getting out there!

Well, I'll need to build an antenna switch so that I
don't need to physically move the antenna from T to R.

But, I'll want to get more proficient at my code before
I try the homebrew again.

Thanks all!

Hope to catch on of you on CW some day!

73

--Tom Nickel

KC9KEP
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W5ESE
Member

Posts: 550


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« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2006, 11:20:13 AM »

Congratulations!

Your post brought back alot of memories.

My first transmitter (1976) was almost
identical to the one you built, except I
used a 6146 instead of the 6DQ6A, an OA2
instead of the OD3, and didn't have the
receiver mute section or a 15m position on
the output filter. The plans were from an
old ARRL Handbook, but I have no idea
which issue.

You did a much neater job of building
yours, too. Nice work! Smiley

Yes, it's a real charge to make contacts on
the air with a rig you built yourself.

Hope to hear you on the air.

73
Scott
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K8AG
Member

Posts: 352




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« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2006, 10:38:55 AM »

Good job, Tom.

My first transmitter was a homebrew 2-tube escapee from  the TV junk pile.  I am not amazed how a $2000+ rig can communicate around the world.  I am amazed how a pile of parts and some effort can do the same.

73, JP, K8AG
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K7JG
Member

Posts: 40




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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2007, 08:54:27 AM »

Awesome!!! Awesome!!!

Boyhood memories flood back. I had stacks of Popular Electronics, QST's and other ARRL publications of that era. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately, given my current stacks) my mother tossed them when I departed for  college. The old bench is still in the basement coal room with some of the tools but the tube stuff is all gone except for the Knightkit Star Roamer.

Thanks for posting! (pdf's of the related articles would be interesting as well)

73, K7JG
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