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Author Topic: Anxiety  (Read 18377 times)
AC4RD
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Posts: 1235




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« Reply #45 on: May 17, 2012, 09:22:34 AM »


So can we go back to the mental issues and problems associated with CW...


John, I am a walking CATALOG of "mental issues and problems associated with CW."   Wink

Last night I heard ZB2FK on 17m CW.  This guy is a great operator, fast and accurate, with a great signal.  I've worked him a few times before, but last night he was using the special "Queen's Anniversary" prefix.   (Digression: I like Brian May's playing a lot, but I can do without Freddy Mercury.)

It's been 20 years since I passed the 20wpm test and you'd think I would be slick and polished.  But I just don't have the motor skills I used to, and I can't send faster than 12wpm with my paddles, without LOTS of errors.   So when I heard ZQ2FK calling, I turned the keyer up to around 25-30wpm, where Ernie seemed to be working, and hit the button that sends my callsign, AC4RD.

I hear a reply: "AC4?"   So I hit the "AC4RD" memory button again.  Only I *don't*.  I hit the key NEXT to it, which sends "DE AC4RD."   That wouldn't be so bad, but I hit it hard enough to make it bounce, so what I actually sent was "DE AC4RD DE AC4RD."  Sad    ZB2FK came back with a signal report at maybe 12wpm--I think he figured out he had a klutz on the other end!

Happily, this stuff is embarrassing, but it doesn't give me any anxiety.  I'm fully aware I'm a klutz, and I've learned to live with it.  Wink  
« Last Edit: May 18, 2012, 09:10:09 AM by AC4RD » Logged
PA0WV
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Posts: 141




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« Reply #46 on: May 17, 2012, 12:02:26 PM »

port at maybe 12wpm--I think he figured out he had a klutz on the other end!

Happily, this stuff is embarrassing, but it doesn't give me any anxiety.  I'm fully aware I'm a klutz, and I've learned to live with it.  Wink 

The receiving of CW by head does not require any motor skills.

So when you are not able to transmit any faster then 12 wpm, the problem is that everybody comes back in that speed.
How do you handle that?

Even tried a cootie key (double speed key)?
Wim PAoWV
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Using an appliance without CW is just CB
AC4RD
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« Reply #47 on: May 17, 2012, 12:48:19 PM »

[So when you are not able to transmit any faster then 12 wpm, the problem is that everybody comes back in that speed.  How do you handle that?

Well, not being able to work my paddles reliably at speed isn't really a problem for me.  I don't care for "chatting" on the air; I like DXing and light-duty contesting. Very fast exchanges! The memory keys on the keyer can do about 95% of that.  

So I usually call someone pretty close to whatever speed he seems to be running, from 8-10wpm at the low end, on up to 25-35wpm.   I don't usually turn the keyer faster than 30-35, but I can recognize my own call and "5NN TU" pretty well even faster.  If I work someone MUCH faster than 30wpm (7O6T, or have you worked HC2SL? That guy is an *amazing* operator), I'm still slower than the other station, but usually we can make an exchange in a couple of seconds and then the DX is answering the next call, and I'm  writing the info in my log.  Wink  

Of course, I run into situations that require manual sending; last night I worked Kees, PA5WT, on 15meters.  Very nice operator!  We traded signal reports and I hit the "73 TU" key, and he came back with "NAME?"  I don't have that in a memory slot, so I just tapped the paddles to spell KEN and then TU--slower than the signal reports, but nobody is perfect.  :-)

I'm not a great CW operator and I'll never BE one--but I'm still having LOTS of fun!  Smiley  73!
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K8AXW
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« Reply #48 on: May 18, 2012, 08:08:17 AM »

I think ya gotta do what ya gotta do.  Listen fast, send slow..... whatever.  Most GOOD CW ops understand this and will show flexibility.  I do get frustrated though with some hotshot CW ops that refuse to slow down because it will (might) lower their score.

I often wonder while listening briefly to CW contests, how many points do fast CW ops lose because the slower operators are reluctant to call these hotshots?
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2E0OZI
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« Reply #49 on: May 18, 2012, 09:12:44 AM »

I went to a presentation on CW by M0BLO in March and he dealt with anxiety quite a bit - which helped me a lot. His tips were;

1. Use previous QSOs (assuming replying to a CQ) to get the information you need, such as name, QTH. This might be called cheating but also might be called "listening"  Wink Then you can concentrate on getting the other OPs call, RST and one other piece of info. Still copy the other stuff, but you know what to expect so you can relax a little.

2. Dont be afraid to keep it really simple even if the other guy want a long chat. At this stage I can handle a simple QSO but not a rag chew. Thats OK.

3. Get on the air - its a hobby nobody will have a cow if you make a mistake.

4. Be fully prepared at the op position - do not (like I did) be scrabbling around for scraps of paper looking for a pen that works!!

5. Get comfy.

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Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
George Orwell
W1JKA
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Posts: 1821




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« Reply #50 on: May 19, 2012, 07:34:01 AM »

   Practice practice both on and off air,start with slow operators,don't worry about solid copy because if you miss a few characters you can usually figure out the word and gist of the message.After 40 years qrt and 3 years later Im back to 13 wpm solid copy and can usally figure out and have a decent qso at 15-18 wpm,I have no desire to be a high speed cw operator and am having great fun just poking along.Nearly all cw operators will gladly meet you current speed level,since most of us started at 0 characters and 0 wpm.Keep at it and it wiil come.
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N8FZ
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« Reply #51 on: May 30, 2012, 05:55:42 AM »

It has been my experience that learning code uses or should use the part of the brain that comprehends music. There is a great cassette tape out there IF you can find it called "The rhythm of the code". It teaches you how learning the code from a music standpoint makes it a lot easier.

The other thing is just make contacts. Nothing gets your speed up quicker than qso's.
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N4IAG
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Posts: 49




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« Reply #52 on: May 30, 2012, 06:15:35 AM »

It has been my experience that learning code uses or should use the part of the brain that comprehends music. There is a great cassette tape out there IF you can find it called "The rhythm of the code". It teaches you how learning the code from a music standpoint makes it a lot easier.

Here it is. I don't know how useful it is for learning the code...but it is catchy Smiley

http://youtu.be/QP0iX_hO7m4
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I want to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like his passengers.
PA0WV
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Posts: 141




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« Reply #53 on: May 30, 2012, 08:09:54 AM »


Forget about that. Never met a guy/gal that became proficient in the code by that way. And it is a lie to promote that making music has something to do with learning Morse code. (unless PERSEVERANCE, because that   is the same basic requirement for both)

Wim
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Using an appliance without CW is just CB
K8AXW
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« Reply #54 on: May 30, 2012, 10:37:41 AM »

Wim:  True but still it's "catchy."   Cheesy
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N2EY
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« Reply #55 on: May 30, 2012, 12:55:27 PM »

And it is a lie to promote that making music has something to do with learning Morse code. (unless PERSEVERANCE, because that   is the same basic requirement for both)

I agree 100%!

I will expand on that "perseverance" theme:

What I see in common between musicians and Morse code ops are:

1) Understanding that they are learning a skill, which takes different techniques than learning a fact or a concept. And not just one skill but a whole set of skills.

2) Willingness to start at a very basic level ("Heart and Soul", "Chopsticks") and gradually move up to more complex things

3) Practice, practice, and more practice, plus an understanding that there is always more to learn and that one's skills can always get better.

4) Ability to keep going after a mistake.

5) Willingness to try different things.

6) Not wasting time looking for the "best" or "ideal" way to learn, but instead pitching in and doing it.

7) Having the value that anything worth doing is worth doing as well as you can.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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K5USF
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« Reply #56 on: July 12, 2012, 03:46:18 PM »

Well, I too am learning morse code.  I am using the just learn morse code software.  I have experienced the same thing you have - miss a letter and then I get behind.  It isn't so much anxiety.  Guess I would call it a lapse in concentration or some other distraction comes into it.  I really have to clear my brain (can't think of anything else), then things work out ok.

I am taking this on as a long term process...But, the sooner I get to the end, the better.

My problem is that I am not a good typist, so I am not only learning morse code, but I am learning to type.  That is more frustrating than the code training.  But, I do type faster than I write.

I started Jun 26 and as of today I am have completed eight letters.  I train about 5 or 6 times a day with each session only about 5-10 minutes long.  I normally take a day off here or there - just to forget about it. I also spend some time sending (off air of course) the letters I have learned.

When I add a letter, it is like starting all over again!  But, at the end of the day it always works out.

Keep pushing and we will get there!
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PA0BLAH
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« Reply #57 on: July 13, 2012, 01:19:59 AM »

So,

56 messages in this thread.

K5DTE, the topic starter, was planning to do 20/15 one character a day. The thread was started May 14 and May 24 was the last posting of K5DTE . At that date he started another thread with an odd new proposal to learn CW,which generated 8 replies,.
but not a reaction of him.

So everything happens as expected.

Bob
« Last Edit: July 13, 2012, 01:26:15 AM by PA0BLAH » Logged
M0LEP
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Posts: 220




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« Reply #58 on: July 13, 2012, 02:01:49 AM »

So everything happens as expected.

Perhaps folks realise that any request for help will gather a whole heap of contradictory responses, half of which will be actively unhelpful, and that it's better to stay silent...
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PA0BLAH
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« Reply #59 on: July 13, 2012, 05:22:21 AM »

May be Rick.

However Topic Starter can look in the history of this forum chapter, before questioning, AND when folks want something, they just buy it, when they don't have the money they increase their home loan, the loans are exported and finally the alien suckers that bought them because their interest rate was higher  pay their purchases.
When the alien guy did not, he still pays via higher tax rates necessary in order to "recapitalise" the banks by the governments.

Homebrewing, is except kitbuilding practically vanished. And kitbuilding is the starting level for a 12 year old. People are proud when they build a kit with predrilled silk screened printed circuits. Really ridiculous. I think the only reason for selling kits is that you don't have to pay for patent rights, because not you the designer,  but the kitbuilder did the final assembling which is patented.
May be another reason is, that the buyers think- when sufficient stupid-  they really designed and made something by themselves by transforming concepts to reality.

Nowadays there are still a lot of retired radioman (that are not able to build anything, because they start with a technician or novice license) When they are passed away over 10 to 15 years, CW will be dead.

Just as homebrewing did already die.

Those radiomen are the big guns in CW. It was their profession and they learned it with a mastering organisation.

However, how many CW REAL amateurs that learned the code on a former professional level or better, will be active in the future?

You will be one of them, I respect your persistent learning behavior.  

I am afraid the jumping on an announced starter in this forum chapter has the reason that the repliers, have the opinion they know something/ have a skill,  another doesn't have, that happens only as an extreme exception in their life, and for that reason they are very proud of it and they jump as flies on the BS offered.

So my opinion is: Topic Starter, just quit before you begin because you will not make it, you waste your time, and your self picture will be at least partially damaged when you have to stop due to lack of persistence.

The guys that make it to reach their goal,  are  the guys that just are stimulated by such a message.
So, I am really helping you Topic Starter, to reach your goal or to prevent wasting your time.

Bob
« Last Edit: July 13, 2012, 05:32:18 AM by PA0BLAH » Logged
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