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Author Topic: Any stations of interest for SWLing?  (Read 24981 times)
KC0MMY
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« on: May 14, 2012, 04:18:00 PM »

I've done shortwave listening off and on again over the past several years.  Since I'm still relatively "new" to the hobby of SWLing, I was wondering if I could get some advice from some fellow and more seasoned listeners. 

What station(s) do you frequently listen to and why?

Aside from the religious stations, which I don't necessarily have anything against, but really don't care to listen to either, are there any interesting foreign stations that broadcast in English? 

For those of you who have been in the hobby for awhile, has the content changed?  Obviously, the news changes on a daily basis, but I guess what I'm trying to ask is:  Is it more interesting, less interesting, or about the same?

Because of the Internet, I would imagine that shortwave listening as a whole has changed a bit since you can listen to some of the stations online.

I live in the Northeast, so what some of you might hear at your location, I may or may not be able to hear at my house.  It's a shame that the Passport to Worldband Radio Book is no longer being published.

Thanks for your time and input!

73 de Andre
KC0MMY
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EI4GMB
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2012, 04:57:11 AM »

Hi Andre,

I listen to many shortwave stations on my receiver though I have to say since the advent of the internet these are decreasing in number. I find Radio Australia interesting. It has some good English language programming. With so much political turmoil going on in the world shortwave makes for fascinating listening. I would suggest tuning in to the English broadcasts of some of these affected countries.
As I am in Ireland and you are in the north-east of the U.S you might hear stations differently. Hopefully, there will be others along shortly who can offer you more helpful listening advice.
Passport to World Band Radio was indeed a great publication. I bought a few old copies at a radio rally recently. It was great thumbing through the pages. It is badly missed.
Anyway Andre, I hope my post has been of some help. I wish you the best of luck with your shortwave listening.

Kind Regards

Fred EI4GMB
« Last Edit: May 15, 2012, 05:07:58 AM by EI4GMB » Logged

'You can never plan the future by the past'

'Those who don't know history are destined to repeat it.'

Edmund Burke (1729-1797)
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2012, 03:39:09 PM »

Monitoring Times still publishes a monthly SW Listener's guide.
I too miss Passport and their reviews.

I enjoy  logging the LW NDB's and also the HiFER stations around 13.5MHz.
Radio Havana Cuba still has their DX/SWL program hosted by Arnie Coro- always interesting.
Then there's the pirate stations below 40M amateur.

Radio Canada International used to broadcast some great local flavor programs in the morning. I haven't listened in a while- my fault.

Dale W4OP
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KC0MMY
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2012, 05:20:54 PM »

Fred:

Thanks for your comments.  I guess the political turmoil worldwide is one of the reasons I would like to listen ... simply to get another perspective from another part of the world.  I'm sure one has to take some of what's said with a grain of salt, but it would be interesting nonetheless.

Earlier this year I was actually able to hear BBC, though it was targeted towards Africa.  I was still excited to hear it, however.

Dale:

Somehow Monitoring Times sticks into my mind, but for some reason I never investigated it.  Seems like it would be an interesting read.  I may have to subscribe to the .PDF version just to check it out.  It's not that huge of an investment.

I do listen to Radio Havana Cuba from time to tine.  I really like Arnie Coro's DXers Unlimited program that they air on Sunday and, I think, Wednesday nights.  The signal is always strong at my QTH, so I can usually always hear it.

Radio Canada International did have some interesting features on it during the morning hours, but, like you, I haven't listened in awhile ... probably a couple of years. 

Thanks for the input!

73 de Andre
KC0MMY
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W0BTU
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« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2012, 08:24:50 PM »

I really like Arnie Coro's DXers Unlimited program that they air on Sunday and, I think, Wednesday nights.

I haven't heard Arnie in some time, but I really liked a lot of what he had to say. Lots of homebrew projects, etc.

Quote
Radio Canada International did have some interesting features on it during the morning hours, but, like you, I haven't listened in awhile ...

When I was in junior high school, the best broadcasting on short wave was Radio Canada International's science program. But that's been gone for years.

Better listen while you can. I think that RCI is going to shut down and go Internet-only.
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W0BTU
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« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2012, 08:36:55 PM »

I listen to many shortwave stations on my receiver though I have to say since the advent of the Internet these are decreasing in number.

Yes, indeed. There's a lot less English SW broadcasting now than there used to be, Fred. 45 years ago, there used to be a lot more than there are now.

I don't know about your part of the planet, but I've read (and agree) that there used to be a lot of countries that beamed English broadcasts --with interesting, quality programing--  towards the USA. But not so much any more.

Having said that, I don't listen outside the ham bands much anymore. Maybe I should.
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W4OP
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« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2012, 07:13:20 AM »

I well recall as a kid being scared to death listening to the Radio Moscow propaganda sessions and then there was the Moscow Mailbag- I think a lot of those letter were made up in order to forward the Communist agenda of the day- but scarey stuff to an 11 year old, never the less.

Dale W4OP
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W0BTU
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« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2012, 10:05:59 AM »

I guess I never heard what you did on Radio Moscow (now the Voice of Russia). We used to listen to it in the late 60's/very early 70's, and we thought all that silly propaganda talk was hilarious.
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EI4GMB
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« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2012, 11:57:07 AM »

Better listen while you can. I think that RCI is going to shut down and go Internet-only.

I heard this too. They have cut programming to the bone on RCI. I also used to enjoy the science programme and the CBC News which I found very reliable.
There is quite a lot of propaganda broadcast on shortwave but it makes for fascinating listening all the same.

Fred EI4GMB

« Last Edit: May 16, 2012, 12:01:56 PM by EI4GMB » Logged

'You can never plan the future by the past'

'Those who don't know history are destined to repeat it.'

Edmund Burke (1729-1797)
KC0MMY
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« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2012, 12:58:40 PM »

Thanks for all the replies, everyone.

I guess I'm just a little too late in getting into the hobby, eh?

Some of the propaganda would be interesting to listen to. 

My reason for wanting to listen to shortwave, or at least be familiar with where the station are at, is to see what's happening around the world. Obviously, I could do this with the Internet, but as you know, some of that may be sensored.  Then there's always the "what happens when the Internet becomes unreliable."  I really think we have too much dependence on te Internet.  Not to say that the Internet is bad ...

Obviously, listening to features and music from different parts of the world would be kind of cool, too.

I'll definitely check out the Monitoring Times.  Seems like it would be a worthwile magazine to look through. 

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EI4GMB
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« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2012, 02:33:30 PM »

Then there's always the "what happens when the Internet becomes unreliable."  I really think we have too much dependence on te Internet.  Not to say that the Internet is bad ...

I agree. Usually the first thing to go when there is trouble in a country is the internet. You can't beat the radio for international coverage.
Best of luck with your listening.  Wink

Kind Regards

Fred EI4GMB

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'You can never plan the future by the past'

'Those who don't know history are destined to repeat it.'

Edmund Burke (1729-1797)
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« Reply #11 on: May 20, 2012, 07:51:56 PM »

All India Radio (AIR) is quite readable on 11670.0 from 1800Z tll 2245Z.  There are a number of segments in English.

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W4HLN
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« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2012, 05:53:56 PM »

WBCQ 7.490 but only on the weekends! and around 5 pm daily!

http://www.wbcq.com/

Great Music....Shortwave talk.....Funny at times!


Ernie / W4HLN
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GABRESEVEN
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« Reply #13 on: June 04, 2012, 03:46:00 PM »

Assuming you have a general coverage receiver, and are interested in utility band listening, try 16540 USB in the marine HF band. It's a Filipino seamans net. I hear it 559 here in Hawaii. And I've heard it the same on 'da Mainland with the same set up I have here...

Where you live would depend on how well you hear it, or if you would at all...

Also try 2998, 4666, 5652, 6532, 8903, 11384, 13300, 17904 and 21985 USB - though the RO is in San Francisco, the transmitters are here in Hawaii, on the island of Molokai sources tell me...

Hearing Southeast Asia is easy from here, it's SWL- DX heaven...

Hope this info helps...

GABRESEVEN
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NU1O
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« Reply #14 on: June 05, 2012, 06:19:50 AM »

I well recall as a kid being scared to death listening to the Radio Moscow propaganda sessions and then there was the Moscow Mailbag- I think a lot of those letter were made up in order to forward the Communist agenda of the day- but scarey stuff to an 11 year old, never the less.

Dale W4OP

I used to listen to them at the same age but fear is not the word I'd use to describe the experience.  Oh, sure we all knew a nuclear war was possible, but through MAD we knew the Soviets were not crazy. I do know I hated their country and their system of government, and so did most everybody I went to school with.

I remember listening to Vladimir Posner on the North American service of Radio Moscow.  Hiring him and beaming him to the US was a brilliant move by the Soviets because he grew up in Brooklyn and he spoke perfect English. He also had a knack for making Moscow's actions not appear to be so terrible as he'd always point out something the US had done and he'd deflect the criticism by showing we weren't perfect. Joe Adamov, another RM announcer, was also good because of his well-spoken English.  In the 90's Phil Donahue made Posner a star in the US because he was now seen by millions on TV with Donahue. I really detested Donahue for giving Posner this stage to spread Soviet propaganda.  Ironically, this is also when Posner became famous inside the USSR. He was a virtual unknown inside the Soviet Union because his audience was Americans, not Soviets. Now, however, he was seen on Russian TV as well as American TV.

Now that the Cold War has ended and we have had many Russians move to the US, I must say I find most of the Russians to be very likable. They are also experts at working the system.  This is something they likely learned in the Soviet days when it took a lot of skill to buy scarce products, and to deal with a monolithic bureaucracy.

I rarely listen to SW broadcasts anymore.  I'm too busy chasing the ARRL's Honor Roll award and SW has changed a great deal for the worse in the last 20 years.  The religious broadcasters seem to have taken over the entire spectrum, and many of the big broadcasters have either cut, or altogether eliminated their SW broadcasts. I'm not a fan of all the relay stations, either.  I remember when if you logged China the broadcast came from China.  Now it could come from Canada, West Africa, or even the USA.  When I do listen I like to listen to the domestic radio services of small countries in Africa, Asia, and South America.  Those are the broadcasts I'd concentrate on were I still a very active SWL.  In the tropical regions they can't use long or medium waves due to static levels so they use short wave for domestic broadcasts.

73,

Chris/NU1O
« Last Edit: June 05, 2012, 06:27:10 AM by NU1O » Logged
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