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Author Topic: The single most vital piece of advice I can give to those wanting to learn CW  (Read 56315 times)
K7KBN
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Posts: 3483




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« Reply #75 on: January 02, 2016, 06:19:01 PM »

There are thousands of hams around the world who "have fun" WELL above 12 WPM.  Many of us never thought of ourselves as being capable of that 20 WPM required back in the old Extra days, but after a few QSOs at 5, then a few more at 10 .... using the radio every day and getting more and more proficient we were doing 25 before we realized it.  Same thing happens today - or it CAN happen, if one wants to give it a chance.  My hands still work on a straight key at and above 20, and I'll be 72 in March.

If you "have fun" at 10-12 WPM, well and good.  Just don't expect everyone to be willing to slow down when they can have fun at a higher speed.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K7EXJ
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #76 on: January 02, 2016, 06:52:14 PM »

First of all it's a hobby in the purpose is to have fun. Second I don't C any reason for going any faster than 10 or 12 words per minute. Because see above it is a hobby....
Lots of hams seem to want to insist that amateur radio is "just a hobby" but it doesn't look like the FCC thinks that. Part 97 calls it the "Amateur Radio Service" and further defines its purpose in this way:

ยง97.1   Basis and purpose.

The rules and regulations in this part are designed to provide an amateur radio service having a fundamental purpose as expressed in the following principles:

(a) Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications.

(b) Continuation and extension of the amateur's proven ability to contribute to the advancement of the radio art.

(c) Encouragement and improvement of the amateur service through rules which provide for advancing skills in both the communication and technical phases of the art.

(d) Expansion of the existing reservoir within the amateur radio service of trained operators, technicians, and electronics experts.

(e) Continuation and extension of the amateur's unique ability to enhance international goodwill.



Stamp collecting is a hobby. Building a model railroad is a hobby. Quilting is a hobby. None of those are Internationally recognized by treaty and none are licensed. You may treat it as a hobby if you wish, but the reason all these frequencies are set aside for our use is because the world expects that least some of us will be competent enough to help out in an emergency or in case of war.
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73s de K7EXJ
Craig Smiley
M0LEP
Member

Posts: 493




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« Reply #77 on: January 02, 2016, 10:15:22 PM »

Middle of last year I did a bit of analysis based on reversebeacon.net logs. See messages in this thread. Broad conclusions were that in general CW averages around 20-25wpm and contest CW averages 25-30wpm. Quite a bit of the contest traffic is computer-keyed.

As for the "just a hobby" thing; well, yes, these days there is a large part of amateur radio which is "just a hobby", but there are also plenty of bits of it where new gound's being broken, new things experimented on, and solid research being done. It may be "just a hobby", but it's a highly technical hobby which offers benefits to others outside the hobby in many ways, and it's mostly because of those side benefits to others outside the hobby that we get the frequency allocations we do. This is true worldwide, even the parts of it where the FCC has absolutely no say. Wink

73, Rick 5Z4/M0LEP
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W9OY
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Posts: 1820


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« Reply #78 on: January 03, 2016, 03:02:19 PM »

W3TTT

I hardly ever go slower than 20.  I will of course slow down, but I tend to try and match my contacts speed and it's generally 25 +- 5

73  W9OY
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OZ8AGB
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Posts: 348




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« Reply #79 on: January 07, 2016, 02:39:13 AM »

Why go faster than 12-15? Because it is a challenge!

I am quite new on CW and struggle with head copy. But I set myself the goal of one day being so proficient that I can become member of HSC. Why? Because of the challenge. Because it is not easy.
I know it won't happen in a minute. Not this year. But some day hopefully before I retire.
 Cool
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GW3OQK
Member

Posts: 398




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« Reply #80 on: January 07, 2016, 03:51:56 AM »

Casey - TI2/NA7U
What did you consider the "single most vital piece of advice" amongst all those replies?

73, Andrew
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