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Author Topic: Restoration forums?  (Read 2685 times)
K8AXW
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Posts: 3898




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« on: May 20, 2012, 09:54:34 PM »

Greetings all:

Any suggestions on old gear restoration forums?  Not for specific gear but cleaning up and repairs to old stuff in general.

I've been working on an old NC-183D receiver and I feel that my efforts are similar to reinventing the wheel and I have to believe someone has been there, done that which should save me a lot of work.

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AD4U
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« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2012, 05:34:08 AM »

I think a "restoration forum" would be a great addition to this site.  But then I guess it could go under the "boat anchor" forum.

There are several sites similar to this one that have a "restoration forum".

Dick  AD4U
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K1ZJH
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Posts: 1069




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« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2012, 06:47:05 AM »

www.antiqueradios.com

Quite a few forums relating to any vintage gear: comm, TV, phono, parts, tubes, etc.

Also, www.amfone.net deals with similar topics, but mostly related to AM ham gear.

73

Pete
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K8AXW
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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2012, 08:27:03 AM »

Thank you Dick and Pete.  I agree that a "Restoration Forum" would be a good forum to be added to eHam.com.

As for specialized gear that would be irrelevant.  Cleaning knobs, aluminum chassis, etc, is the same for about everything.

Right now I'm in the process of removing decades of skin oil from large knobs with a screwdriver.  This is a very time consuming and painstaking process and still the results are less than what I want.  There HAS to be a easier way of doing things than brute force and ignorance.

Thank you both for your suggestions.  Will check the links.  Maybe they will provide answers and if not perhaps more links to follow.
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KD0REQ
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« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2012, 01:13:11 PM »

knobs:  alcohol and/or ammoniated window cleaner and a toothbrush.

as always, check a drop of the stuff on the back of the knob first.  some aggressive cleanings will wreck the finish, or could remove printing on dials.

you might have to put a little paste wax on some types of bakelite knobs, or Novus #1 polish, because they came out of machining rough and originally were waxed and buffed to a shine.
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KAPT4560
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« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2012, 02:53:11 PM »

 The National Archives on QTH.net is still active for National help.
 As for appearance restoration, I find that auto body shop supply stores have many products for cleaning, polishing and appearance care.
 The Hammered finish gray paints can be a close match for the Nationals. The Textured satin black or gray isn't really a wrinkle finish, but if the whole cabinet needs paint and you aren't a stickler for authentic restorations it looks good for little cost.
 A set of small stiff brass and nylon brushes for cleaning helps. They can be made stiffer by shortening the bristles. Cotton rags and not paper towels. If you use steel wool, blow the work off with compressed air when done. You can take decades off an old unit. Do one section at a time.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2012, 08:37:33 AM »

I've searched for National boatanchor restoration (and various other descriptions) to no avail.  Will try National Archives and various other descriptions to see if something jumps out.  Thanks.

I am taking this one step at a time but these plastic knobs are creating a lot of manual labor with the finger grease on the main tuning knobs and the mold on the rest of them.  I'm not concerned about the aluminum inserts because I know there are many products available for cleaning and polishing aluminum.

I stay away from steel wool at all costs.  I've had some really bad experiences with steel wool in my younger days of radio.
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W0FM
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« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2012, 02:11:30 PM »

Try soaking the knobs in water with a couple drops of Dawn liquid dish detergent for a few of days.  The Dawn will do for the knobs what is does for your dishes.  Cuts the grease!  Then the grooves in the knobs can easily be cleaned with a toothbrush.  The screwdriver comment scares me.  ;o)

73,

Terry, WØFM
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K8AXW
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« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2012, 08:25:43 PM »

Terry:  will try the Dawn idea. I've been away from this project for some time now in order to get another piece of gear operational.  I can do this Dawn/knob thing at the same time.

The little screwdriver works fairly well but there a lot of slots on the knob. Then when I do get most of the grease out there's still some left in the crannies.

Al
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