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Author Topic: To dumb to be a Lid  (Read 3669 times)
AF5DN
Member

Posts: 21




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« on: May 21, 2012, 12:47:10 PM »

I am to dumb to be a Lid

Ok… I will admit I was a CB-er back in the 70s.  Thought HAM would be an interesting hobby so here I am.

That said.  I read and read a lot on the internet.  I have yet been able to find the answer to what I thought would be an easy question.

What is the proper protocol for trying to get a Radio Check on a repeater? 

The repeater call sign, my call sign, then ask for a check?
My call sign, the repeater call sign, then ask for a check?
Toss out my call sign and hope for an answer?
Never say the words "Radio Check" ever again?
Never say "Check" ever again?
Something different entirely?

Some help here please.

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N0MKC
Member

Posts: 68




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« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2012, 01:03:41 PM »

This may be one of those regional convention questions...  (What's accepted one place may get you branded a lid in another place...)

That caveat given, I usually give my call sign and "test transmission" or just "testing".
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NO2A
Member

Posts: 779




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« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2012, 01:13:12 PM »

Announce your call over the repeater to establish you`re listening. If someone comes on,call them. Usually if someone has a signal or audio problem they will tell you right away. Nothing wrong with asking though. Sometimes mobile stations have alternator whine or ignition noise on transmit,sometimes on receive only. The main thing is to start a conversation then go from there.
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K5LXP
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Posts: 4481


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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2012, 01:18:44 PM »

Rather than say "radio check" ask for a signal report.

"Could someone please give me a signal report?  (This is) W1ABC."

Works every time for me.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM


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K2OWK
Member

Posts: 1061




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« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2012, 02:00:39 PM »

I was told to give my call sign and then say listening. I have had call backs most of the time this way.

73s

K2OWK
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




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« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2012, 05:00:11 PM »

Rather than say "radio check" ask for a signal report.

"Could someone please give me a signal report?  (This is) W1ABC."

Works every time for me.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM





I like this method. 

Don't overuse it, save it for times when you *really* have reason to suspect a problem with your setup. 


73
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N4CR
Member

Posts: 1666




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« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2012, 05:11:11 PM »

This is N4CR. Can I get a radio check?

Would work every time on any of the popular repeaters in Central Florida.

Speak plain English on repeaters. If you want a radio check, ask for one. If anyone gets twisted into a knot for asking in plain English I wouldn't spend any time worrying about it. It's also not something you should get in the habit of asking. If I heard it every day from a repeater newby I'd eventually counsel them to just throw their call out and listen.

The most common opening line I use on our repeater is either:

N4CR
or
N4CR Listening

Usually I just say my call.
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2802




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« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2012, 05:26:51 PM »

As far as giving the repeater's call sign, don't worry about it.  It should identify itself, usually with Morse code, at the proper intervals.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K6LCS
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Posts: 1534


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« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2012, 06:32:28 PM »

>> ... What is the proper protocol for trying to get a Radio Check on a repeater?  

As with 99.99999% of on-the-air comments, PLAIN ENLISH should be used to get the job done.

Simply monitor the frequency for a few seconds to make sure you are not interrupting anyone, key your mic and wait a second, and announce:

"This is K6LCS requesting a radio check, please." (Please use YOUR callsign ... )

Any reasonable listener will come right back and help you. But do not "over-use" a system until you get to know its users/members better ... (grin)

Systems that discourage such testing should be deleted from your memories ... and, unfortunately, there are a very few snobbish systems out there. They think they are elitist - but they are, in reality,  merely detrimental to the hobby.

Clint K6LCS
909-241-7666
http://www.k6lcs.com
« Last Edit: May 21, 2012, 06:33:59 PM by K6LCS » Logged

Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com
KA1MDA
Member

Posts: 543




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« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2012, 08:31:04 PM »

I am to dumb to be a Lid

That should be "I am too dumb to be a Lid"
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6034




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« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2012, 05:08:04 AM »

Rather than say "radio check" ask for a signal report.

"Could someone please give me a signal report?  (This is) W1ABC."

Works every time for me.


Not saying that you're wrong, but CBers were famous for asking for that.  Might not get you branded as a lid--but as a CBer!   Grin
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3828




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« Reply #11 on: May 22, 2012, 08:53:25 AM »

CJS is right.  "Radio check" is a CB radio thingy.  I like LXPs method.... ask for a signal report. 

I usually add after getting someone to respond, "I'd like a critical signal report because most hams, being nice guys and gals, are reluctant to tell you your signal sounds like crap. 

If you want a report on something specific about your signal, ask for it. This is usually done after changing mics or a repair to the radio.  You don't usually ask for a signal report on a repeater if you've changed antennas, feed lines or similar things because the answers to these questions can be had with SWR meters, S-meters, etc. 

The exception of course is if you're in a fringe area and need to know how well you're getting into the machine or if you suspect your transmitter is off frequency.
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K6LCS
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Posts: 1534


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« Reply #12 on: May 22, 2012, 09:16:20 AM »

>> ... "Radio check" is a CB radio thingy.

I will make sure I tell that to the local law enforcement agencies that uses that phrase ... they'll get a kick out of it ... (grin)

Plain English requests get the job done. "Signal report" or "transmission check" "or new antenna tryout" - whatever. And if anyone belittles you on the air for askinjg for such, just drop that system from your "favorites" and move elsewhere.

Clint K6LCS
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Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com
N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9908




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« Reply #13 on: May 22, 2012, 11:16:28 AM »

I usually say something like this is N6AJR , I just got this  radio ( antenna  , amplifier etc) working. how does it sound?.   Other wise  If I am mobile I say, this is N6AJR mobile, am I making the repeater OK?... something along these lines, and I too was once on the 11 meter band too. ( back in the 70's) , a radio is just a radio, its the folks on  the air and how they act  that makes the difference.
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




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« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2012, 11:47:49 AM »

Bear in mind that the jargon that is used and "permissable" on repeaters is very likely to be a LOCAL thing, as well. 

LISTEN first, find out what others do and then emulate them. 


73
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