Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Better Take My $5 Offer For Your Mint 75A4  (Read 9447 times)
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2546




Ignore
« on: May 23, 2012, 05:51:11 AM »

My Kids Collect Nothing. Neither do any of their friends. WSJ says that's quite typical:


"Young people today have little interest in the stamp, coin or knickknack collections of their elders, so an aging America can't help but wonder: What's going to happen to all those boxes in the basement?"


"In Palo Alto, Calif., Tom Wyman, 78, has about 900 antique slide rules. Mr. Wyman belongs to the 430-member Oughtred Society, named for William Oughtred, who in the 1620s invented an early form of the slide rule. The group hosts lectures to entice youngsters to embrace slide-rule collecting. But Mr. Wyman says such "missionary work" is a hard sell. "It's quite a challenge to give a talk that keeps everybody awake -- both the 80-year-old collectors and the 12-year-olds in the audience."

"Mr. Wyman's son, Tom, 41, who doesn't know how to use a slide rule, admires his dad's devotion to preserving the instrument. Still, he appreciates that his father has promised to eventually dispose of the collection. "He has told me, 'I won't saddle you with this,' " says the younger Mr. Wyman."

http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB114083232066183248-3_yPrOHBN0M5WJLDYi_8KI5wcsM_20060305.html?mod=blogs
Logged
NO2A
Member

Posts: 769




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2012, 12:00:24 PM »

They end up on "Pawn Stars." Last night they had a Les Paul SG guitar from 1961 owned and played by his wife,Mary Ford. It was sold by a family relative. Complete with paperwork and Les Paul`s signature,which was verified by a specialist as authentic. Price? 90,000. I suppose there`s always someone who would be interested provided they know what it is,and someone wants to buy it. What happens though when anyone old enough to remember what an antique is,is no longer alive? Will it still hold a value? Even if the tubes don`t work? If they do? Wink
Logged
K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1695




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2012, 05:18:38 PM »

My Kids Collect Nothing. Neither do any of their friends. WSJ says that's quite typical:

Of Course!!

Young people do not have jobs. They live with their parents going to college hoping for a non-existent job when they are done with college. They can NOT afford to collect anything. Many of them have to have their parents pay their college bills, cell phone bill, iTunes bill etc. After all that the parents are tapped out and ain't gonna pay for any collecting.

Collecting is hardly dead. Go across the river to Belleville, IL the third weekend of every month. The largest and best Flea Market  in the St. Louis area lives happily in spite of WSJ dire predictions. 500 - 800 sellers every month and thousands of buyers. You might even meet K9IUQ there.  Cheesy

Jeff, since the 75aa4 is worth $5 in your opinion, give me $100 and I will haul off your obsolete Flex 5K next time I am at Belleville. I will negotiate.

LMAO

Stan K9IUQ
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2546




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2012, 07:57:16 PM »

Actually Stan, my wife and I walked thru the seedy Belle Clair Fairgrounds about 30 years ago. Piles of typical Southern Illinois detritus:  Billie Beer cans, "rare" barb wire and insulators, and a sign that read, "East St Louis - Next Exit."

Looking at the Fairground's website I see this rather typical event coming up:

"30TH ANNUAL BELLEVILLE
ANTIQUE AMERICA GLASS
SHOW & SALE
FEATURING:  A TO Z DEPRESSION, ELEGANT, CARNIVAL, PATTERN GLASS,
AMERICAN MADE DINNERWARE AND POTTERY OF THE DEPRESSION ERA
NO REPRODUCTIONS!"


Gee genuine carnival glass! That's junk, (often made-in-Japan) tableware given as prizes at fairs decades ago. Can you picture anyone under 70 buying that? Or anyone with money paying much for it in the future?

Good example tho, Stan. St Louis had many antique malls years ago. All are gone now. As for the Belleville flea market... well, I don't often shop over that way. LOL
Logged
NK6Q
Member

Posts: 202




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2012, 10:48:49 PM »

Last night they had a Les Paul SG guitar from 1961 owned and played by his wife,Mary Ford. It was sold by a family relative. Complete with paperwork and Les Paul`s signature,which was verified by a specialist as authentic. Price? 90,000. I suppose there`s always someone who would be interested provided they know what it is,and someone wants to buy it.

An original SG played by Mary Ford (and there are lots of promo shots of Les and Mary with matching SG's, which was probably that very guitar).  I'm surprised it only went for 90 grand!

The vintage guitar market is a way-different "kettle of fish" than old ham radio gear and slide rules.  These instruments are still used and still collected.  Their value and monetary appreciation have exceeded the performance of gold.  But it has to be the "right" guitar. An old Harmony in the attic?  Maybe a few hundred bucks, maybe less.  An old Fender Broadcaster?  Say hello to six figures!

A '61 Gibson SG is definitely the "right" guitar.  A '78 Gibson Marauder is not (at least not now)

Bill in Pasadena with a few Telecasters in the closet
Logged
K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1695




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2012, 04:13:52 AM »

Gee genuine carnival glass! That's junk, (often made-in-Japan) tableware given as prizes at fairs decades ago. Can you picture anyone under 70 buying that? Or anyone with money paying much for it in the future?

You have a lack of knowledge of the collectible market. From Wikipedia:

"Carnival glass is highly collectible. Prices vary widely, with some pieces worth very little, while other, rare items command thousands of dollars. Examples of carnival glass can be easily found in antique stores, and there is a very active market for it on eBay."
"Most U.S. carnival glass was made before 1925, with production in clear decline after 1931. Some significant production continued outside the US through the depression years of the early 1930s, tapering off to very little by the 1940s."


One mans trash is another man's treasure comes to mind.
If only I had not junked that 1957 Chevy Convertible I had back in the 60's.  Grin Grin

I will gladly pick up any carnival glass you have and since you think it is worthless I will gladly pay you bottom dollar. In fact I would love to pick over any of your "trash".

Stan K9IUQ

« Last Edit: May 24, 2012, 04:21:25 AM by K9IUQ » Logged
K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1695




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2012, 04:43:26 AM »

Actually Stan, my wife and I walked thru the seedy Belle Clair Fairgrounds about 30 years ago. Piles of typical Southern Illinois detritus

Among the S.IL "detritus" (we just call it trash, in S.IL we do not try to impress with big words) you will find this fellow with several tables of restored radios. He is only there in the warm months, he is located in the back of the main building in the covered buildings. He meticulously restores radios of the past. Altho he is not a ham he does restore old ham communication rx's. He had a Halicrafter S-40 RX last weekend along with 3 or 4 really nice Transoceanics. He usually has many restored AM radios along with other unusual radio items. Tubes, parts, old radio publications too. I have bought several radios from him in the past including a like new Halicrafter S-38FB.

He gives a 1 year warranty on everything. His restoration work is excellent. All caps replaced etc. Personally I do not really like Flea Markets. I go because my wife loves them. The Restoration Radio Guy at the Belleville Flea Market makes that trip worthwhile for me.

Stan K9IUQ
Logged
KG4NEL
Member

Posts: 373




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2012, 07:21:31 AM »

Quote
My Kids Collect Nothing. Neither do any of their friends. WSJ says that's quite typical:

Simply can't afford it. I also don't really see the point of collecting things that don't get used on at least an occasional basis - I wouldn't mind having a little collection of CW keys at some point to use on the air, but why tie up that kind of money at this point in my life?
Logged
AE4RV
Member

Posts: 948


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2012, 07:50:36 AM »

I suspect they're collecting virtual things like apps, various forms of digital media and in-game status bragging rights.
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2546




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2012, 08:15:53 AM »

Who wrote the wiki piece about the value of carnival glass?  Likely an "expert" dealer stuck with pallets of it. You can still find Beanie Baby price guides saying the rare ones have huge value. But I see dozens of key Beanies for sale on Ebay... with zero bids.

My point is that the graying of ham radio is typical of most traditional hobbies. (collecting hobbies have fared even worse) I don't think many of us realize that. There's nothing uniquely wrong with ham radio just as there's nothing wrong with model railroading, stamp collecting or working on cars.

As my oldest son approached 16 I drove thru the high school parking lot. There were no souped up cars. Thankfully, almost no one drag races as they did years ago. I was relieved to learn that only one or two kids out of 1600 drove motorcycles (definitely for old men). The HS had no hobby clubs. I'm not sure it even has a computer club; no doubt it did 30 years ago.

Last night I asked my eldest son why he doesn't have a hobby (he has an unused Tech license, btw). Without hesitation he snapped that he most certainly did: Working out.

Consider that his gym, like many now, is open 24 hours a day.
Logged
K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1695




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2012, 08:28:09 AM »

I also don't really see the point of collecting things that don't get used on at least an occasional basis -

As a collector of many things, I can tell you a very good reason to collect. To make $$$. Here is just one example. When I was young I collected Case Knives. I belonged to a knife club and would buy regularly. Most of what I bought was Stag handle, and many Limited Editions. I amassed about 100 Case Knives. I still have most of them, new in the box unused. Their worth has increased considerably in the years I have owned them.

Then there is the example I gave earlier of junking a 1957 Chevy convertible when I was young. Care to guess what that car would had been worth if I had kept it? Enough to furnish several top quality Ham Stations.

Most collectors I know do not collect to make money. The do it for the "hunt" and usually collect things they like and would use.

My house is completely furnished in Antiques, thanks to my wife of 37 years. Everything she has bought has appreciated in value. We use the furniture every Day. I eat off Currier&Ives collector plates. My tv sits on a very old antique table. I read by a Tiffany lamp. You get the idea.

We needed furniture anyway, why not buy antiques that appreciate in value instead of Furniture store crap that will be worthless in a year?

Stan K9IUQ
Logged
K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1695




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2012, 08:44:23 AM »

Without hesitation he snapped that he most certainly did: Working out.

Consider that his gym, like many now, is open 24 hours a day.

Since most young people consider that a great meal is at the Golden Arches or the local Pizza Palace, working out makes sense...

When I was young I worked out too. I started delivering newspapers at age 12. At first just evening Newspapers, after a couple of years I did Morning and Evening newspapers. My parents did not help me either, I rode my bike, paid for by my newspaper deliveries. At age 14 I got my Ham license. I had to "work out" harder to get money for ham gear. At age 16 I got a drivers license. I was hired to drive the Newspaper truck and make the Deliverys to newspaper boys and the Retail places that sold newspapers. I had to get up every morning at 2:30 AM for this job. After school I worked until 6pm.

This was my "working out", no gym needed.  Grin Grin

"Working out" made sense to me. It bought me hamradio gear, my own car(s). I never considered "working out" was a hobby. It was something I had to do.

Stan K9IUQ
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2546




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2012, 09:00:26 AM »

I can give example of things that once carried enormous value and now have little. Rare pearls for example. Or my house Smiley

What would it have cost to store, maintain, and insure that '57 Chevy for a half century? Some cars have done well and some have done terribly... really old ones for example. People want the cool stuff from their childhood, not from their grandpa's childhood. I don't want a 1920 Chalmers like my grandfather had. LOL

Not all art appreciates, BTW. Especially when you trip and fall into the Picasso:
http://slyoyster.com/newsandpolitics/2010/art-student-ruins-a-picasso-painting/
Logged
KB2FCV
Member

Posts: 1159


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2012, 09:23:39 AM »

I'm wondering where collecting vintage radio will be in 30+ years? Will there be as many collectors as there are now? I think I fall on the younger end of the collecting spectrum. I'm 38 now and I've been collecting vintage ham radios since I was a teenager shortly after I got my license.
Logged
KG4NEL
Member

Posts: 373




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2012, 09:45:30 AM »

Quote
As my oldest son approached 16 I drove thru the high school parking lot. There were no souped up cars.

Not one fart-can muffler? No BBS knockoff wheels? Civics with 747-surplus spoilers? I have a very hard time believing that  Cool
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!