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Author Topic: Better Take My $5 Offer For Your Mint 75A4  (Read 10120 times)
K0OD
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Posts: 2558




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« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2012, 10:27:18 AM »

I was really curious how many "jalopies" I'd see. Drove up and down every aisle. Not one junker. This is a pretty affluent suburban HS and without some ethnic groups that are still heavy into cars and cruising. Overwhelmingly kids drove rather boring recent model imports.

There was a single exception. My son played HS ball with a kid who had an amazingly restored Camero. I was shocked when I saw it because he was the only player who couldn't afford to go on our Florida spring training trip (more indication of how big sports are). His dad was a laid-off truck driver (very into cars) and the kid worked in an oil change place to make money for the Camero restoration. 

You figure out how many of those 1600 teens will ever crave that '57 Chevy. 
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K9IUQ
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Posts: 1964




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« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2012, 11:27:24 AM »

You figure out how many of those 1600 teens will ever crave that '57 Chevy. 

Even if they craved one it would not matter. Young people don't have Jobs, Jobs are required to pay for things.
Teens today do not want to work.

I live in Orchard country. I have heard many stories how teens used to work in the Orchards picking apples/peaches. Today kids do not work in the Orchards. Adult Mexicans do. Today's Teens sit at home texting, eating at Mickee D's and working out at the gym... Wink

Stan K9IUQ
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K9IUQ
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Posts: 1964




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« Reply #17 on: May 24, 2012, 05:31:40 PM »

the kid worked in an oil change place to make money for the Camero restoration. 

These are the kind of kids we need more of. Kids that know the value of working instead of having PaPa buying them "rather boring recent model imports".  These same kids Join the Armed Services and go to Afghanistan, Iraq, and other places to protect our freedoms. Freedoms that include "working out in a gym" as a hobby...

Stan K9IUQ
 
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2814




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« Reply #18 on: May 24, 2012, 07:58:35 PM »

They end up on "Pawn Stars."

That pawn shop on "Pawn Stars", so I have discovered, is exactly one block from my late parents' old house in Vegas.  I was just doing a virtual cruise up Las Vegas Boulevard and saw the sign.  I grew up one block east of there, on South 6th.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K1ZJH
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Posts: 1087




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« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2012, 07:21:58 AM »

I'm wondering where collecting vintage radio will be in 30+ years? Will there be as many collectors as there are now? I think I fall on the younger end of the collecting spectrum. I'm 38 now and I've been collecting vintage ham radios since I was a teenager shortly after I got my license.

I think the interest will be there, but the pool of grey-haired Elmers will have been
long depleted. When you see threads asking what is this, with a photo of a Dow
Key relay, you can understand why newer hams who never been exposed to the
ancient ways become confused. Getting a vintage transmitter and receiver to work
together properly can be a challenge for someone who cut his teeth on all-in-one
packaged Rice-Boxes. Not to demean the current crop of new hams, the technology
has changed.

Pete
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K0OD
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Posts: 2558




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« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2012, 09:40:52 AM »

You're going to have generations with little fear or knowledge of HV.

Heck, most of my son's EE school construction is done with PSPICE! With my 1977 TS-820 the sealed compartment holding its 6146s is nicely marked with a huge red "High Voltage" warning.  

How many transmitters, even amps, from before the "lawyered up" 70s took such protective measures? They probably seemed silly in 1977, but heaven help curious future generations, kids perhaps, who stumble upon tube devices.
  
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KB9VGE
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2012, 11:10:01 AM »


If only I had not junked that 1957 Chevy Convertible I had back in the 60's.  Grin Grin


OK.  What would you do with that $1200?
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Chevrolet-Bel-Air-150-210-1957-chevrolet-four-door-/251069968011?pt=US_Cars_Trucks&hash=item3a74efae8b
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2012, 02:11:00 PM »

Without trying to be a doom and gloomer, I wonder how many of us realise how fragile our modern society has become.
The key infrastructure which makes our society modern, is just one thing - electricity.
All the other energy sources, such as petrochemicals are important, and they keep us fed, warm, and mobile.
But electricity defines modernity.

If the electricity were to fail, we would soon be back in 1860, no computers, no electric lights no electric pumps and control systems.
If this were to be a long time outage, such as caused by an 1859 class solar flare, then once society has adjusted, those slide rules will be gold.
Similarly, sextants, which are becoming museum exhibits will be resurrected and pressed into service for navigation.
Those slide rules will come in handy for making up navigation tables for use with the sextants.
Muskets, with homemade ammunition/powder, will be more valuable than assault rifles once their ammunition runs out, as will old style bladed weapons and bows.

Many societies have reached technological summits, and then lost the technology due to natural calamities.
In many cases, we are astounded to find an artifact which indicates a sophisticated understanding of science and engineering which we, in our hubris, thought not possible.

The "Antikythera mechanism" a mechanical celestial computer for use in both navigation and astrological fortune telling was found in a shipwreck from 2200 years ago.
Maps from the 1500's, compiled from much earlier lost maps, show Antarctica, which was only supposedly discovered in the early 1800's.

There are many "anomolous" artifacts found which point to technological societies which were lost in time.
Plastic is reputed to last thousands of years, I wonder if that basement of slide rules will one day be found to point to ours.

Just a thought, 73 - Rob

« Last Edit: May 30, 2012, 02:13:46 PM by STAYVERTICAL » Logged
G3RZP
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Posts: 4727




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« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2012, 04:03:07 PM »

Fifty or so years ago, most people built their first station. Even if it was making a DX20 and BC348 work together. Or adding xtal control to a Command TX.

No more so. Partly because of the attitude  ' I don't need to know how a car works or how to fix it to drive it'.

The same with ham radio. Which is why you see questions here from Extra Class licencees which make you think " How the *&&%%$££%& did he ever pass the exam?"

And then we blame the guy instead of the system.....Which no longer offers any real incentive to properly learn, especially by doing. Way back then, a ham could be a possible technician employee even if unqualified: regrettably, it means little now.
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KG4NEL
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Posts: 373




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« Reply #24 on: May 31, 2012, 05:29:43 AM »

Quote
No more so. Partly because of the attitude  ' I don't need to know how a car works or how to fix it to drive it'.

Well, do you? Smiley

Even when everything was carb'ed with valves that needed adjustment every 5k miles and went through 2 quarts of oil per change, I'm not sure I buy that everybody did everything to their own cars, and it all of a sudden stopped because the technology changed.

The ease of which home DIY'ers were able to do things changed, but there have always been tinkerers, and people who just want to turn on the power (or turn the key) and go. Nothing wrong with that...
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 2558




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« Reply #25 on: May 31, 2012, 06:27:41 AM »

I'll tell you that my mom never once got out of the car at a gas station. Would let the "Men from Texaco" do everything. "Full Service." And my dad wasn't much different. I think he slept in a suit, hat and white shirt.

Broken TV?  Heck the repairman came to our house, and often in the early 50s.
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KD8MJR
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Posts: 2532




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« Reply #26 on: May 31, 2012, 01:53:40 PM »

As to what the OP posted It's not really a worry.  The diminishing numbers of working units is always going to be less than the collectors that want them.  I have a friend who has a couple of classic cars and his buddies and him drive for hundreds of miles just to track down a spare part for the never ending restoration.

In 30 years just see how many SB-220's are around and then try to get a band switch for one  Wink
There will always be pristine examples of each piece of Ham Gear even 200 years from now but the numbers will be low not because of a lack of collectors but the lack of spare parts will just condemn 99% of them to the heap as time passes.

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KD0PBO
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Posts: 67




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« Reply #27 on: May 31, 2012, 10:22:20 PM »


Even if they craved one it would not matter. Young people don't have Jobs, Jobs are required to pay for things.
Teens today do not want to work.


From a full time college student and late teen who works 25 hours a week, pays for gas, insurance, and a truck bill, I can't help but be a little flustered by your comment, Stan. I find it sad that this is your perception of my generation. I may not want to work a job that pays $7.89 an hour in customer service where everyone treats you like crap, but I do, and it doesn't mean I value my job less than the kid that changes oil at the local shop. Why? Because I want to make something of myself just like he probably wants to be a mechanic and I want to get my Audio Production degree and start getting paid to enjoy my career in my first hobby of AF. I am a Ham opp not just because its a "hobby" but because I'm fascinated by the science and physics of RF like I am with AF. Do I have the money to afford radios outside of a 2m mobile and 2m/440 ht? No, but I work with what I got. I have my general ticket and desperately want to work some HF but finding an affordable rig that isnt broken, has bugs, or an old tube type (only like tubes in my guitar amps not my radios) is like finding a needle in a haystack. So please, next time, try to remember that not ALL teens live solely in the moment but that some do aspire to be greater than texting fiends who eat mcdonalds and workout at 24 hour fitness.

"A job is simply selling your labor. A career is a hobby you get paid to enjoy." -My sociology professor.

73
Miles D.
KD0PBO
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #28 on: June 01, 2012, 12:58:16 AM »

Miles,

You are a credit to your generation - literate, controlled and courteous in rebuttal.
I also have children of your generation, who work very very hard, are solid citizens and just great human beings.
I understand your customer service job, I have been in that position also, and agree with your observation.

Your college professor is quite right - and also, we work to live, not live to work.

I wish you all the best in your future career, hope doors open for you in your chosen path, and have a great journey through life.

73 - Rob
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K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1964




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« Reply #29 on: June 01, 2012, 06:01:31 AM »

So please, next time, try to remember that not ALL teens live solely in the moment but that some do aspire to be greater than texting fiends who eat mcdonalds and workout at 24 hour fitness.

I may not want to work a job that pays $7.89 an hour

73
Miles D.
KD0PBO

Miles, I stand corrected and I apologize. I should have said "Teens I know, do not want to work".

As you mentioned teens do not want to work for $8 an hour. They feel they are entitled to top pay for little work.... This is why we have vast numbers of illegal Mexicans doing the $8 an hour jobs that teens in your generation will not take...

Sorry that your generation has not impressed me..

Stan K9IUQ
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